House of Commons Hansard #77 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was private.

Topics

Canadian Security Intelligence Service
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Waterloo—Wellington
Ontario

Liberal

Lynn Myers Parliamentary Secretary to Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 32(2) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, copies of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service 2000 public report.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River
Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to three petitions.

Interparliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Oak Ridges, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34 I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report of the chair of the Canada-Japan Interparliamentary Group's 11th annual meeting with its counterparts in the Diet of Japan held April 30 to May 4.

The 11th biannual consultations were very successful. The message that Canada is at the forefront of the new economy and is an important partner for Japan in many areas was well received. Consultations reinforced the bond which exists between the Canadian parliamentarians and Diet members. Japan is a friend and a valuable partner to Canada.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Human Resources Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, entitled “A Common Vision”.

The report was produced by our two subcommittees on the status of persons with disabilities and on children and youth at risk. It looks at ways of focusing government resources across departments to meet the needs of children and the disabled. It makes recommendations on how the government should work horizontally rather than using the usual vertical silo approach.

The report is a good example of how an all party committee can work. Our subcommittees are smaller and work more informally than the parent committee. It makes for more productive interaction between MPs, between MPS and witnesses and, as this is a joint report, between committees. I congratulate all concerned.

I also have the honour to present, in both official languages, the fifth report of the Standing Committee on Human Resources Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities entitled “Access to Higher Education and Training”. The report is a follow up to a series of public hearings we held on access and mobility with respect to training, ranging from apprenticeships to the professions.

As this is our last report, I would like to thank all members of the committee, all witnesses who appeared before the committee this year and, in particular, I would like to thank the staff.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Susan Whelan Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology entitled “Transparency in the Information Age: The Lobbyists Registration Act in the 21st Century”.

The committee conducted a statutory review of the Lobbyists Registration Act and many important ideas emerged from the hearing. The Internet is changing the way policy is made. Lobbying aims at all levels of the public service, and government policy making has changed a great deal in the past decade.

I want to thank the witnesses and the members of the committee. I also want to thank our clerk, Normand Radford, our researcher, Geoffrey Kieley, and all the staff for their diligence.

I would also like to table, in both official languages, the fifth report of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology entitled, “A Canadian Innovation Agenda for the Twenty-First Century”. This report is the committee's third report on innovation. Canada's recent record in acquiring knowledge and producing highly skilled workers has been impressive.

The committee recommended two general avenues of pursuit: ensuring that more research and development is done in Canada and broadening current innovation targets to include indicators of commercialization and diffusion of Canadian and world research and development.

In closing, I want to thank all the witnesses, all the members of the committee and our staff, our clerk, Normand Radford, our researchers, Dan Shaw and Daniel Brassard, and all the staff for their diligence in ensuring that we could table this report today.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the fifth report of the Standing Joint Committee on Official Languages.

I am pleased to table this report, which is an interim one. We feel it necessary to point out that the bilingual services provided by Air Canada are of vital importance for Canadian travellers.

The committee has expressed the wish that, if possible, the government respond to this report by the end of September, so that the committee may continue to study this matter when we resume sitting in September.

The committee wishes to underline the outstanding collaboration and support of the people who appeared before the committee and also of the people who served the committee.

We wish to thank researchers Robert Asselin and Françoise Coulombe, from the Parliamentary Research Branch of the Library of Parliament, as well as co-clerks Tonu Onu and Jean-François Pagé and their support staff for their invaluable contributions, which have enabled us to table this fifth report this morning.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Liberal

Charles Hubbard Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present in both official languages the second report of the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food entitled, “The Future Role of the Government in the Grain and Oilseeds Sector”.

I would like to point out that while agriculture as a whole is doing well in this country, there are serious concerns in the grains and oilseeds sector. With that, our committee will be progressing in the fall to meet with producers to look at our various areas of Canada and hopefully bring back to the House a report on that sector.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Liberal

David Pratt Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 81(7) and (8) I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the second report of the Standing Committee on National Defence and Veterans Affairs on the plans and priorities of the estimates 2001-02 of the Department of National Defence. Pursuant to Standing Order 109 the committee requests a government response.

The report takes advantage of recent changes in the standing orders which gave committees the opportunity to comment on the future plans and priorities of the departments under their responsibility.

I have been asked by members of the defence and veterans affairs committee to note that time constraints prevented us from commenting on the plans and priorities of the Department of Veterans Affairs this year. However it is our intention next year to provide full comment on the plans and priorities of both departments.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I wish to seek unanimous consent for the following motion regarding the disposition of business over the next couple of days. I move:

That at 5.15 p.m. on June 13, or when the business of supply in the present supply period is concluded, whichever is later, any proceedings before the House shall be interrupted and all questions necessary to dispose of Government Order, Government Bills (Commons), Number C-11 and Government Order, Government Bills (Commons), Number C-24, and Government Order, Government Business Number 7 shall be put without further debate or amendment, provided that no division requested thereon may be deferred and provided that, if the House is not sitting at that time, a special sitting shall be convened for the purposes of this Order.

That, during the consideration of the business of supply this day, if a division is requested on any motion to concur in any item or items in the Main Estimates, immediately after the taking of the said division, the questions on all subsequent motions to concur in any item or items in the Main Estimates shall be deemed to have been carried on division.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Bélair)

Is there unanimous consent to proceed in such a fashion?

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Some hon. members

No.

Micro Credit Act
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Liberal

Jean Augustine Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-385, an act to facilitate micro credit for self-sufficiency.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present this private member's bill.

The purpose of the bill is to encourage a greater availability of banking and other financial services to those with low or unstable incomes, and to increase the availability of credit in small amounts, up to $5,000, for small entrepreneurial enterprises.

The bill calls for an annual report to be published by the Minister of Finance showing the progress in improving micro credit by the financial institutions that agree to participate. The institutions that attain a certain level of activity could describe themselves as being recognized by the government as micro credit specialists.

This enactment would affect directly low income people for the purpose of increasing their ability to generate income. These small loans, made at a reasonable and commercially viable rate of interest, would enable them to start or expand their own businesses and to work their way out of poverty with dignity.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deepak Obhrai Calgary East, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-386, an act to amend the Criminal Code (breaking and entering).

Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure for me to rise today on behalf of the constituents of Calgary East to reintroduce my private member's bill that would amend the criminal code to impose a two year minimum sentence for repeat offenders of break and enter crime.

Break and enter crime is not only a property offence, it is a crime against a person. It is a psychologically damaging crime, often leaving victims feeling personally violated and traumatized. It has the potential to be a violent crime because every break and enter is a home invasion.

The bill is a victims' amendment to the criminal code because the result will be fewer victims brought about by imposing a real deterrent on professional break and enter criminals.

The bill would also cut out what is the real source of revenue for career criminals and organized crime by breaking the cycle of using the proceeds of break and enter crime to finance other criminal activities.

I welcome the support of my colleagues for this non-partisan initiative.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-387, an act to amend the Criminal Code (bail for those charged with violent offences).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to introduce the following private member's bill, an act to amend the criminal code, bail for those charged with violent offences.

The bill would prevent a person accused of sexual assault with a weapon, aggravated sexual assault or criminal harassment, who has been identified by the victim or by a witness to the offence, from being released on bail. The result would be that the accused would not be released unless the charge was withdrawn or the accused was acquitted at the trial. This would be in the interest of victims.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)