House of Commons Hansard #11 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was diamonds.

Topics

Prairie Farmers
Statements by Members

2 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, on Friday, October 4 the editorial board of the Ottawa Citizen said that the government should eliminate the Canadian Wheat Board or turn it over to the farmers themselves with membership entirely voluntary. I am quoting from the Ottawa Citizen editorial:

It is offensive that anyone is required to sell his production and skill to one buyer, namely the federal government, at the price it determines in secret. When the federal government defends the existence of the wheat board, it is defending the expropriation of farmers' property. Virtually no other profession in this nation--and that includes grain farmers in Ontario and Quebec--is forced to give up the efforts of its own production to a government monopoly. It's time we put to pasture the notion that farmers shouldn't be allowed to grow their business like any other.

All Canadians should be very concerned about the use of government force to expropriate private property from prairie farmers because next time, it might be the Liberals coming after their property.

Governor General's Awards in Commemoration of the Persons Case
Statements by Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to rise in the House today to acknowledge the occasion of Michele Landsberg's receipt of the Governor General's Award in Commemoration of the Persons Case. Awarded annually to six Canadian women in recognition of their outstanding contribution to society, these awards commemorate the Famous Five, the women who fought to guarantee recognition of women as persons.

Passion, fearlessness and determination are all words used to describe Michele Landsberg as a writer, a speaker and a person. A resident of St. Paul's and a columnist for the Toronto Star , she works tirelessly to bring a human side to her columns and provides a strong voice for women and children both through her writing and in public. She works hard behind the scenes as well, volunteering her time as an advisor and an activist to feminist, anti-poverty and social justice endeavours.

I congratulate Ms. Landsberg, as well as the other five women who received this honour.

Fédération des agricultrices du Québec
Statements by Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, this year, the Fédération des agricultrices du Québec is celebrating its 15th anniversary. In 1987 a group of women came together to develop a true community and meaningful professional strength in the evolution of agriculture in Quebec.

For the women involved, the challenge at hand was to have the agricultural sector recognize their invisible contributions. In 15 years, these women have established structures giving them access to power and ensuring their right to property. The actions by the women farmers of Quebec have led to significant changes and have eliminated the discriminatory clause that made the spouses of farmers ineligible for grants.

The Bloc Quebecois would like to publically thank the women farmers of Quebec, recognize their merits and encourage them in their work to affirm the place of women in agriculture.

Communities in Bloom
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Aileen Carroll Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to applaud the efforts of the city of Barrie which, along with the Parish of Saint Hellier, capital of the island of Jersey in Great Britain, took first place in the international challenge category of the 2002 Communities in Bloom competition. This competition is a national municipal beautification contest with a focus on flowers, landscaping, gardens and environmental awareness.

The city of Barrie entered 320 gardens, competing with gardens from Ireland, England and the United States. It was its first time competing in the international category. Many thanks to city of Barrie alderman Patricia Copeland, and Mona Boyd, the city's horticultural supervisor who supported the city's participation in this event.

Congratulations to the city of Barrie for its bloomin' success.

Terrorism
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deborah Grey Edmonton North, AB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay my respects to the victims of Bali's horrifying nightclub bombing. With close to 200 dead and over 300 wounded, the attack is the worst act of terror in Indonesia's history. It struck in the heart of an island that has been renowned as a vacationer's dream. On October 12 that dream turned to a nightmare.

Many of the people killed in the blast were young. Among them were travellers, surfers, rugby players and newlyweds. As we know, many of those killed in this incident were believed to be Australian. Our thoughts are with that country which has suffered such an enormous loss.

Four Canadians were injured in the blast. Mervin Popadynec, a Calgary rugby player and oil industry engineer, is still missing and presumed dead. Our hearts go out to his family, friends and teammates at this difficult time.

This bombing was a senseless act of terrorism targeted at the values of freedom and liberty.

On behalf of the Canadian Alliance, I offer our sincere condolences to the families of all the victims of this horrible tragedy.

Parliamentarians against Corruption
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Charles Caccia Davenport, ON

Mr. Speaker, for two and one-half days last week, parliamentarians from 60 countries gathered in this chamber to discuss ways and means to combat corruption. They formed the Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption, an action oriented global network to help parliaments and parliamentarians in fighting corruption. Governments will benefit from this parliamentary initiative made possible by the determination and commitment of the member for St. Albert. He deserves applause and support.

The fact that 168 parliamentarians from all continents participated sends a clear signal to governments and business that corrupt practices are coming under close scrutiny and will be dealt with. The organization will meet again in two years to measure progress and adopt new measures to fight corruption in its many forms.

Congratulations to the hon. member for St. Albert.

Terrorism
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of my NDP colleagues, and I am sure I speak on behalf of all members here, I express our deepest sympathy to the people of Australia as they mourn the loss of so many of their fellow citizens in the senseless act of barbarism that took place in Bali and which also took the life of a fellow Canadian, Mervin Popadynec, from Wynyard, Saskatchewan.

We share the horror and sadness of Australia and of all others whose lives and families have been scarred by this act of meaningless violence, particularly, of course, the Popadynec family in Saskatchewan.

Let those of us who practise politics rededicate ourselves to finding political solutions to the world's problems. Let those who practise such terrorism be caught and brought to justice and let others who contemplate such violence cease and desist: They are a discredit to our common humanity.

Highway Infrastructure
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Robert Lanctôt Châteauguay, QC

Mr. Speaker, the residents of my riding and all of Montérégie are disappointed by the evasive comments made by the federal Minister of Transport regarding highway 30.

He recently announced that the agreement to extend would be ratified soon. However, we learned that he was still at the stage of all kinds of studies. When this government says soon, it most certainly does not mean soon, and that is disappointing.

Already, back in January 2001, the federal Minister of Transport said that highway 30 was a priority. Apparently the word priority does not mean anything for this government. In the end, all the federal Minister of Transport is trying to do is appease the people of Montérégie and put off indefinitely signing the memorandum of understanding with the Government of Quebec, which has been ready for a long time now.

The residents of Montérégie have been waiting for this highway for a long time now. The words soon and as soon as possible and priority no longer mean anything, and this is cannot go on. How long will it take for a priority to become a reality?

Autism Month
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, October is Autism Month. Autism brings many challenges to children and families. Autism spectrum disorders appear at birth or very early in a child's development. They affect essential human behaviours such as social interaction, the ability to communicate ideas and feelings, imagination, and the establishment of relationships.

The Government of Canada is committed to improving the health and well-being of all Canadians and will continue to support efforts by provinces and territories to provide services for those affected by this disorder. Included in these initiatives are the federal disability strategy, the Centres of Excellence for Children's Well-Being, and the community action program for children. The government also supports the UN convention on the rights of the child.

We must continue to strive to support families and children of all ages, including those with disabilities such as autism. I wish to congratulate and thank the Peterborough chapter of the Autism Society for its fine, caring work.

Member for Cardigan
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, despite allegations of corruption and political patronage, the Solicitor General has feebly maintained that the good people of Prince Edward Island have benefited from his patronage contracts. The Solicitor General would have us believe that the patronage contract to his brother, the patronage contract to the president of the P.E.I. Liberal Association and the patronage untendered contract to his personal friend are in the best interests of all. How can the benefit to a few be so advantageous to the P.E.I. masses?

It is the Solicitor General's blatant unethical behaviour that gives all politicians a black eye. When we put our names forward to the public, we are expected to fulfill our duties with the highest of integrity. Those who hold public office know that if something has any scent of impropriety it must not be done. The Solicitor General has not passed this litmus test. The Prime Minister must replace this minister right now and he must do it for the good of the government, for his party and for this country.

Biofuels
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Erie—Lincoln, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada must develop a biofuel industry quickly and aggressively. Biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel offer us cleaner, greener, renewable energy resources.

We forget that fossil fuels have huge hidden environmental, medical and social costs. We fail to realize that the biofuel industry will stimulate the rural economy, creating employment and investment opportunities while helping farmers to diversify into new markets. Most important, the use of biofuels will help us reach our Kyoto commitments in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Canada's biofuel industry cannot go it alone. It needs support for greater innovation and infrastructure. I encourage the government to support new ethanol and biodiesel processing plants, establish renewable fuel content targets and reduce excise tax on biodiesel. I urge the government to lead the way by increasing the use of biofuels in federal government vehicle fleets.

This issue is of critical importance to Canadians. The government must respond now.

Grain Transportation
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Lynne Yelich Blackstrap, SK

Mr. Speaker, grain terminal workers at the Port of Vancouver have been locked out for eight weeks. The situation is becoming desperate for the transportation of this year's crop, which already has been doomed by summer drought.

Agreeing that the grain handling system is inefficient, many farmers feel the situation could be improved if transportation of grain becomes the responsibility of the buyer. This would remove some of the risk farmers face when moving their product by channels plagued by problems such as the grain workers lockout in Vancouver.

There are no winners and a lot of potential losers in this current dispute. Grain handlers were locked out on August 25. The government has done nothing to solve this two year dispute. No one benefits from strikes and lockouts when final offer selection arbitration is an option. I urge the government to intervene in this grain handlers dispute by compelling the parties to seek immediate third party arbitration.

Women's History Month
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Sarmite Bulte Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to recognize that Women's History Month 2002 is celebrated during this month of October. This year the theme for Women's History Month is “Women and Sports--Champions Forever!”.

In October 1992 the Government of Canada launched Women's History Month to encourage greater awareness of women's contributions to Canadian society and to recognize the achievements of women as a vital segment of our Canadian heritage.

In the Speech from the Throne the government stated that it will work with its partners to develop a national strategy for healthy living, physical activity and sport and will convene the first ever national summit on these issues in 2003.

Recently I decided to become physically healthy again. I quit smoking, and our colleague, the Minister of Health, took part this month in the CIBC Run for the Cure, to find a cure for breast cancer.

October is a great opportunity for all members to set an example, show leadership and become physically healthy again.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Canadian Alliance

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, today was supposed to be the day the government showed the provinces its implementation plan for the Kyoto accord, but there is still no plan and province after province is dropping its support.

The Ontario government has warned that for Ontario the accord will mean “huge job losses, a huge drag on the [economy] and billions of dollars in lost revenue”.

Will the government now admit that it should not ratify Kyoto until it has a plan and until it has built consensus around that plan?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the delay in the meeting is so that we can take advantage of the consultations that are taking place.

It also allows us to take advantage of the very important work done by the Alberta government, which presented a paper only two or three days ago. In addition, the province of Quebec has made representations in the last few days which are very valuable to us as we assess what we should do on the 28th of this month.