House of Commons Hansard #26 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Fairness at the Pumps Act
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Conservative

Diane Finley Haldimand—Norfolk, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-14, An Act to amend the Electricity and Gas Inspection Act and the Weights and Measures Act.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Motor Vehicle Safety Act
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Liberal

Siobhan Coady St. John's South—Mount Pearl, NL

moved, seconded by the hon. member for Trinity—Spadina, for leave to introduce Bill C-512, An Act to amend the Motor Vehicle Safety Act (side guards).

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Trinity—Spadina for seconding my private member's bill. I know she has advocated for the changes that I seek to make in this bill as well.

Today I am introducing a private member's bill to increase road safety. The bill would amend the Motor Vehicle Safety Act to ensure that all vehicles in the higher weight categories that are manufactured or imported to Canada would be equipped with side guard protection. With the passage of the bill, Canada would join the European Union and Australia in protecting its citizens such as pedestrians and cyclists against the risk of falling under the sides of vehicles in higher weight categories.

My province of Newfoundland and Labrador has recognized the value of this safety measure and is installing side guards on its new fleet of snow removal equipment. Many lives could be saved if these measures were in place. The tragic loss of Jessica Holman-Price has moved her family into action on this very issue and her family brought this information to me. Her parents are with us today as well.

I urge all members of the House to support this bill when it comes up for debate.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

North Korean Refugees
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, I am presenting a petition today that has been signed by hundreds of residents of southern Ontario, from Scarborough, Toronto, Mississauga, Brampton, right through to London, Ontario. These Canadians are very concerned about the human rights situation in North Korea. There are thousands of refugees who try to escape the brutal, despotic thugs who run the North Korean government.

The petitioners call upon the House of Commons and the Government of Canada to support my Motion No. 383 and vigorously participate in an international effort to urge the government of China to ensure the safe passage of North Korean refugees, so that they can leave and go to South Korea or other parts of the world. It is a desperate human rights situation in North Korea provoked by a despotic government. The petitioners call on the Government of Canada and the Parliament of Canada to support North Korean refugees to bring an end to this crisis.

Assisted Suicide
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Conservative

Pierre Lemieux Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition I would like to table from people in my riding. It includes over 160 signatures from such places as Maxville, Alexandria, Dunvegan, Vankleek Hill, Alfred, et cetera. The people who have signed this petition value human life, particularly at its most vulnerable stages. I am speaking of the elderly and the sick. The petitioners are asking parliamentarians to vote against Bill C-384, which is the bill that seeks to legalize euthanasia and assisted suicide.

Credit and debit Card Industry
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

NDP

Jim Maloway Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions to present today.

The first petition is signed by dozens of Canadians calling on the House of Commons and the government to bring greater accountability and transparency to the credit card industry. Debit card transactions are currently handled by Interac, which is a non-profit organization made up of Canadian banks. Debit card fees are currently flat fees per transaction, and there is no review process for increases to credit card or debit card fees at this time.

In addition, there is no requirement that credit card and debit card fees be disclosed at the point of sale to consumers. Also, debit card and credit card fees can be increased without justification.

Credit card fees are a percentage of the total sale, and the federal government is prepared, now, to allow Visa and MasterCard to enter the debit card business, effectively allowing Visa and MasterCard to change from small flat fees to a fee which would greatly increase the cost of all purchases.

The petitioners demand that the Conservative government enshrines in legislation that debit cards be kept at a flat fee and that credit card fees be made transparent and accountable.

Afghanistan
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

NDP

Jim Maloway Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, the second petition, also signed by dozens of Canadians, requests an end to the war in Afghanistan. Canadian soldiers and Afghan citizens continue to die in a never-ending war that gets worse with each new deployment of troops. There has been a 40% increase in civilians killed in 2008, with more than 100 tons of bombs dropped by NATO each month. Clearly, women's rights are not on the agenda of the Afghan government. The war has cost Canadians more than $18 billion. That money could have been used to improve health care and seniors' pensions right here in Canada.

Polls continue to show a clear majority of Canadians want the war to end before the scheduled removal date of 2011. The petitioners call on the government to bring home the troops now.

Seeds Regulations
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Conservative

Larry Miller Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to table a petition signed by approximately 150 people from across Canada who are in support of Bill C-474 and GMO seeds.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 13, 20, 21, 30, 40, 51 and 94.

Question No. 13
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

With regard to the vaccine for influenza A (H1N1): (a) what contractual agreements exist between the government and GlaxoSmithKline for the production of this vaccine; and (b) what contractual agreements exist between the federal government and any provincial government for the distribution of the vaccine?

Question No. 13
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the response is as follows: a) The World Health Organization has recognized Canada as a leader in pandemic preparedness and one of the first countries in the world to put in place a domestic contract for pandemic influenza vaccine production.

Since 2001, the Government of Canada has had a 10-year contract in place with ID Biomedical, now GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Biologicals, to assure a state of pandemic readiness in case of an influenza pandemic and to supply Canada with pandemic influenza vaccine on a priority basis. Under this contract, GSK is required to develop and maintain a production capacity in Canada of a minimum of eight million doses of pandemic vaccine per month for four months, enough to immunize all Canadians.

The H1N1 pandemic vaccines were produced at GSK’s manufacturing facility in Ste-Foy, Quebec. GSK supplied Canada with enough doses of the pandemic vaccine to meet domestic requirements.

b) Under the vaccine contract, GSK is required to distribute pandemic vaccine from its manufacturing site to specified depots as identified by provinces and territories.

Question No. 20
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Yukon, YT

With regard to the report done by Natural Resources Canada "From Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007'', what are the estimated economic costs (2010-2050) of adaptation to the following significant impacts as identified regionally in the report: (a) rising sea levels triggering more frequent and higher storm surges, and subsequent flooding in the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island; (b) rising sea levels in the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island, especially in southeastern New Brunswick; (c) coastal erosion triggered by storm surges, flooding and rising sea levels, including the economic costs of infrastructure threatened by coastal erosion, in the Provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island; (d) river flooding from the increased participation and a variable winter climate in the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island; (e) damage caused by the increased frequency of ice storms in the Province of Quebec; (f) infrastructure sensitivity in Nunavik due to thawing permafrost; (g) vulnerability of coastal zones to sea level rise, flood risks and saltwater intrusion into groundwater in the Province of Ontario; (h) infrastructure impacts of near shore lake warming; (i) infrastructure and transportation impacts of decreasing water levels in the Great Lakes, especially on the shipping industry; (j) impacts to the energy system from reduced hydroelectric output; (k) potential arrival of the mountain pine beetle, in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba; (l) diminished surface water resources; (m) impact of increased drought on the agricultural sector and water systems; (n) increased extreme rainfall events; (o) spread of mountain pine beetle infestation, in Canada's Northern Communities; (p) the impact on northern communities and businesses of the expected reduction in the availability of ice roads, especially in the mining industry; (q) the impact of melting permafrost on community and industrial infrastructure, including waste containment structures; (r) replacing food that has been secured through traditional and subsistence activities; (s) climate related changes in forest productivity in the Province of British Columbia (B.C.); (t) the impact of rising sea levels on coastal communities and infrastructure; (u) the impact of abrupt changes and/or distribution of pacific salmon, sardine, anchovy, and western red cedar; (v) the impact on B.C.'s hydroelectric system of water shortages; (w) the impact of drought and water shortages on agriculture in the B.C. interior, especially in the Okanagan region; (x) regarding these impacts, and others identified in the 2007 report, what is the government's climate change adaptation strategy; and (y) if the government does not have a climate change adaptation strategy, when will one be developed, and what is the mechanism for doing so?

Question No. 20
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the report “From Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007”, coordinated by Natural Resources Canada and published on March 7, 2008, is a comprehensive scientific assessment of climate change impacts and adaptation in Canada. The goal of the report was to provide a state-of-the-science synthesis that identified important climate change impacts in Canada and to provide a knowledge foundation for adaptation decision-making.

Since publication of “From Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007”, the Government of Canada through various departments and agencies has undertaken a number of initiatives to improve its knowledge of the economic costs of both climate change impacts and of adaptation. These on-going initiatives include: 1. Natural Resources Canada’s “Guidance on the Economics of Adaptation” project which will provide practical guidelines to better i) understand and assess the economic threats and opportunities presented by climate change and ii) cost, prioritize and sequence adaptation strategies into plans and budgets in a context of uncertainty and competing needs. 2. Environment Canada’s examination of approaches to estimating and forecasting the economic impacts of climate change which will focus initially on the economic impacts on Canadian space heating and cooling expenditures, agriculture production, and costs associated with sea level rise. 3. The National Roundtable on the Environment and Economy’s “Economic Risks and Opportunities of Climate Change” program which includes research to estimate sector-specific costs of climate change impacts and the role of adaptation in reducing costs, focussing on public infrastructure, human health, forestry, and coastal zones.

In addition to this work on methodologies and cross-sectoral analysis, many federal departments are now looking at the economic costs of climate change impacts and adaptation as part of their own risk management processes.

One of the key findings of “Canada in a Changing Climate” was that a wide range of players are involved in adaptation decision-making, including all levels of government, the private sector, and individuals / community organizations. Hence additional work on the economic costs of adaptation is being undertaken by provincial and territorial governments, municipalities, resource managers, etc.

Natural Resources Canada has developed a new regional adaptation collaborative, RAC, program to help advance adaptation decision-making across Canada by drawing together a diverse array of public and private stakeholders and focusing on the development of guidance and best practices, including economic analysis. The program will support focussed collaboration at the regional level among government, non-government decision-makers, and technical experts to facilitate regional adaptation planning and decision-making. More information can be found at www.adaptation.nrcan.gc.ca.

Question No. 21
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Yukon, YT

With respect to the government's 2020 target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% from 2006 levels: (a) what is the government assessment on how Canada will meet the 2020 target; (b) what is the government estimated emission levels for each year in the period 2010-2020, in megatonnes, specifically noting which year Canadian emissions will peak; (c) how many emission credits will need to be purchased to meet the 2020 target, and where does the government intend to purchase them from; (d) what does the government estimate the carbon price, under the carbon pricing scheme that the government plans on using, will be for each year in the period 2010-2020; and (e) in detail, following the statement of the Minister of Environment on October 29, 2009, how will the 2020 target be met with a carbon price that is $28 per tonne?

Question No. 21
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, consistent with the government’s commitment to harmonize Canada’s approach to climate change with that of the United States in the interest of both our environment and our economy, Canada has inscribed a target of a 17% reduction in greenhouse gas emission from 2005 levels by 2020. This is the same target inscribed by the United States.

The answers to these questions will ultimately be the product of decisions made by the Government of Canada regarding regulatory action to reduce emissions. Although the government has signaled its intention to move forward on harmonizing its efforts with the approach taken by the United States, the details regarding how the system will work have not yet been established. Consequently, the government is not in a position to answer these questions at this time. However, the government is continuing to work on developing a plan for meeting the 2020 reduction targets.

Question No. 30
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

John McKay Scarborough—Guildwood, ON

With regard to the government’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Counsellor created by Order in Council on March 26, 2009, what progress has the government made in providing the Counsellor with: (a) an official office space that is accessible to the public and space for the Counsellor’s staff; (b) if an office has been provided, where is it located and precisely which offices have been allocated at the given address; (c) if staff have been provided, how many staff does the Counsellor have and what are their functions; (d) what is the budget for the Counsellor’s office and staff; (e) has the Counsellor yet received any complaints in relation to Counsellor’s mandate; (f) why is there no clear and user-friendly information on the government’s Foreign Affairs and International Trade website to assist Canadians in contacting the CSR Counsellor; (g) what is the email address, fax number, phone number and address for the current Counsellor; (h) if an office and staff have not yet been provided, from where is the current Counsellor working and how is she undertaking her responsibilities as mandated by the Order in Council; and (i) if an office and staff have not yet been provided to the Counsellor, when does the Minister expect to provide them, and if they have been provided, on what date were they procured?