House of Commons Hansard #64 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was hunting.

Topics

Protecting Children from Online Sexual Exploitation Act
Government Orders

5:20 p.m.

Bloc

Serge Ménard Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Marc-Aurèle Fortin.

Protecting Children from Online Sexual Exploitation Act
Government Orders

5:20 p.m.

Bloc

Christian Ouellet Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Marc-Aurèle Fortin, thank you.

The Bloc would rather prevent crime and find remedies for it instead of arresting people after the fact.

Statistics in Canada show that most Canadian parents use outdated or ineffective methods to teach their children about personal safety. Does the member for Marc-Aurèle Fortin think that we could include some preventive measures in this bill to help parents teach children about personal safety and about behaviours that could cause them problems?

Protecting Children from Online Sexual Exploitation Act
Government Orders

5:25 p.m.

Bloc

Serge Ménard Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, that would probably be a good idea, but I honestly will not suggest it. I do not want to slow down the adoption of this legislation by suggesting another amendment. This is only the beginning, but it is a good start. It is giving the public access to an organization that will deal with online child pornography. I hope that it will make this material disappear.

It would be a lot of work to add obligatory child education. If we think about how long it took to craft this little egg, an amendment like that would be like crafting a bull. However, it would be a good idea to do it.

I have a beautiful bookmark with a painting by Marc-Aurèle Fortin that I would like to give to my colleague so that he can remember the name of my riding.

Protecting Children from Online Sexual Exploitation Act
Government Orders

5:25 p.m.

NDP

Jim Maloway Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, part of the bill requires that an ISP or other person providing Internet services, when the police is notified, must keep the computer data related to the child pornography offence for 21 days and after that the computer data must be destroyed unless the police have obtained a court order to keep the data.

Other members have drawn attention to this provision and asked the question about whether the 21 days are long enough? I would like to ask the member, as a long standing lawyer and a member of the House, whether he thinks the 21 days would be adequate or is that another provision that we are going to have to change at committee?

Protecting Children from Online Sexual Exploitation Act
Government Orders

5:25 p.m.

Bloc

Serge Ménard Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, I know my limitations and that question goes beyond my area of expertise. My impression is that the timeframe is that short for technological reasons. I am hoping that they will explain in committee what happens when someone has seen a website with child pornography and has informed the organization. What happens next? I hope that the child pornography will be taken down immediately.

However, the timeframe seems reasonable to me if it is in order to come to a conclusion about the nature of the site. It could even be longer than 21 days. If this organization is inundated with reports at the beginning, it will require an efficiency that is often lacking in government organizations.

Protecting Children from Online Sexual Exploitation Act
Government Orders

5:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

There are still a couple of minutes before 5:30 p.m. Does the hon. member for Elmwood—Transcona wish to start his remarks?

Protecting Children from Online Sexual Exploitation Act
Government Orders

5:25 p.m.

NDP

Jim Maloway Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to speak to Bill C-22 for two minutes.

I have to admit that this has been a very long process. I have been reading the Hansard on this bill and previous incarnations of it. This whole process has been about five years now. The computer industry changes very dramatically, so the government and Parliament had better hurry up and get on top of this issue. We may find that by the time we get to where we want to be, a new problem will have presented itself.

In June 2008 the legislative assembly of Manitoba passed a law requiring all persons to report to cybertip.ca any material that could constitute child pornography. Ontario passed a similar law in December 2008. The United States and Australia adopted laws in 2002 and 2005 respectively, imposing this requirement on ISPs.

I will point out some of the benefits of dealing with cybertip.ca. It is currently estimated that over 5 million child sexual abuse images are on the Internet. An analysis of over 12,000 website incidents was done by cybertip.ca. It was looking into the countries that hosted these sites. The United States was number one at 49%. Russia was second at 20%. Canada had a surprising 9% of all the sites. Japan was at 4.4%. South Korea was at 3.6%.

Protecting Children from Online Sexual Exploitation Act
Government Orders

5:30 p.m.

NDP

The Acting Speaker Denise Savoie

I regret to interrupt the hon. member. He will be able to continue his comments with 18 minutes left when this returns on the order paper.

The House resumed from June 10 consideration of Bill C-280, An Act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (qualification for and entitlement to benefits), as reported (without amendment) from the committee.

Employment Insurance Act
Private Members' Business

5:30 p.m.

NDP

The Acting Speaker Denise Savoie

It being 5:30 p.m., the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion at report stage of Bill C-280, under private members' business.

Call in the members.

(The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)

Vote #75

Employment Insurance Act
Private Members' Business

5:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I declare the motion carried.

The House resumed from June 15 consideration of the motion that Bill C-469, An Act to establish a Canadian Environmental Bill of Rights, be read the second time and referred to a committee.

Canadian Environmental Bill of Rights
Private Members' Business

June 16th, 2010 / 5:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion at second reading stage of Bill C-469 under private members' business.

(The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)

Vote #76