An Act to amend the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (derelict vessels and wreck)

This bill was previously introduced in the 41st Parliament, 1st Session.

Sponsor

Jean Crowder  NDP

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Introduced, as of Oct. 16, 2013

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Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

This enactment amends the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 to strengthen the requirements relating to derelict vessels and wreck by ensuring that regulations are made to establish measures to be taken for their removal, disposition or destruction. It provides that the Canadian Coast Guard shall be designated as a receiver of wreck for the purposes of Part 7 of the Act, and requires receivers of wreck to take reasonable steps to determine and locate the owners of the wreck.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Canada Shipping Act, 2001
Routine Proceedings

June 16th, 2011 / 12:20 p.m.
See context

NDP

Jean Crowder Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-231, An Act to amend the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (derelict vessels and wreck).

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member from New Westminster—Coquitlam for seconding the bill.

In many Canadian coastal communities derelict and abandoned vessels have a negative impact on the natural aesthetics of their harbours, and some pose a threat to the local environment. While major environmental dangers from derelict and abandoned vessels are dealt with swiftly by the Canadian Coast Guard, many are left to simply rot away and leach chemicals into the surrounding environment. If an abandoned and derelict vessel is not a major environmental concern and is not posing an obstacle to navigation, there is usually no action taken.

The Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities can become involved in the following situations.

Transport Canada can currently take a lead in instances where a vessel is the cause of an obstruction to navigation. However, vessels in the inter-tidal zone are rarely an obstruction to navigation.

Transport Canada has also been supportive of salvage claims made to the receiver of wrecks when questionable vessels appear ashore or in waters adjacent to communities. However, salvage claims are rarely made against derelict vessels.

Finally, Transport Canada can take the lead in making an assessment as to whether a vessel may pose a threat of pollution. However, an abandoned or derelict vessel that is deemed non-polluting is not dealt with.

Both I, in Nanaimo—Cowichan, and the member from Victoria often hear complaints about derelict vessels that are not dealt with. Hence, I have introduced Bill C-231, An Act to amend the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (derelict vessels and wreck).

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)