Appropriation Act No. 2, 2011-12

An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the financial year ending March 31, 2012

This bill was last introduced in the 41st Parliament, 1st Session, which ended in September 2013.

Sponsor

Tony Clement  Conservative

Status

This bill has received Royal Assent and is now law.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Votes

  • June 22, 2011 Passed That the Bill be now read a third time and do pass.
  • June 22, 2011 Passed That Bill C-9, An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the financial year ending March 31, 2012, be concurred in at report stage.
  • June 22, 2011 Passed That the Bill be now read a second time and referred to a Committee of the Whole.

Opposition Motion--Closure and Time Allocation
Business of Supply
Government Orders

November 25th, 2011 / 10:50 a.m.
See context

Liberal

Scott Simms Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, NL

Mr. Speaker, there was some confusion earlier about the fact that no bill has received royal assent. For the record, since the election, Bill C-2, C-3, C-6, C-8, C-9, several bills have received royal assent. I do not know where that confusion is coming from.

Nonetheless, I would like to read what I think is the quintessential quote about how we should uphold the principles of debate in the House and that every member of Parliament willing to speak on an issue should have his or her say:

The role of each and every individual in the Chamber is to have an opportunity to stand up and debate legislation. If we want Canadians to have faith in this institution and in the relevance of parliament, we must be able to debate intelligently and to make suggestions, not just to take a wrecking ball approach but to put forward thoughtful suggestions and thoughtful input into legislation.

Who said that? The Minister of National Defence said that several years ago. At the time he was complaining that 30% of the bills were time allocated. The Conservatives are now up to 50%. Half of the bills have been subject to time allocation.

November 22nd, 2011 / 9:20 a.m.
See context

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I move that clause 34 be amended by replacing line 8 on page 19 with the following:

742.3, if exceptional circumstances exist that justify the service of the sentence in the community or if

Standing alone, that may not make much sense, so let me just try to very quickly explain the rationale.

The whole approach here is to permit the sentencing judge to consider the imposition of a conditional sentence order, notwithstanding the restrictions in exceptional circumstances. The rationale for that is that by removing the possibility of a conditional sentence for so many types of offenders, it is expected that the judge may move towards what might be called the least severe sentence, whenever possible. Now, if a conditional sentence is no longer available, the judge may consider suspended sentences followed by a period of probation if incarceration is inappropriate. But in many cases, neither a suspended sentence nor a system of incarceration is appropriate.

To sum it up, judges, defence lawyers, and crown counsel may well face situations where a more reasonable and just result is simply unavailable. Now, given what might be called legislative creep and the erosion of conditional sentences, first in Bill C-9 and now in this bill, I am proposing—this is a recommendation that was made as well by the Canadian Bar Association and indeed is based upon their recommendation—that consideration be given to including safety-valve provisions, because in effect Bill C-10.... This is a specific case study that restricts and limits judicial discretion on sentencing. But that discretion has formed a fundamental part of our criminal justice system.

The U.S. experience with mandatory sentencing guidelines resulted there in a dramatic transfer of power from the judiciary to the prosecution service, which they are revisiting and reconsidering and are indeed moving away from as a result, in particular, of the U.S. Sentencing Commission report of just a week ago.

To sum up, Mr. Chairman, conditional sentences in Canada would give judges the capacity to shape sentences, based on their experience and the collective experience of other judges, for specific offenders who are convicted of specific offences. Any further limitations on that judicial discretion, regrettably, will tread too deeply into the important role judicial review plays with regard to the specificity of the offence, the specificity of the offender involved, and the ability to exercise that discretion appropriately, having regard for all the circumstances.

November 15th, 2011 / 11:20 a.m.
See context

Michael Atkinson President, Canadian Construction Association

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'll be giving most of my time to Mr. Barnes.

Good morning, and thank you very much for the invitation to appear. My name is Michael Atkinson. I'm the president of the Canadian Construction Association. I'm accompanied today by Mr. Jeff Barnes, who is a senior principal with Stantec Consulting Inc., a member of our association. Mr. Barnes has over 30 years of experience in environmental assessment across Canada and internationally, and he will be outlining our position on the CEA Act.

The Canadian Construction Association has some 17,000 member firms from coast to coast to coast across Canada, working primarily in the non-residential construction industry. As an industry, construction employs over 1.25 million Canadians and accounts for just under 7% of Canada's overall GDP.

I mention this to provide you with some context and to emphasize that when planned projects experience issues of uncertainty, unpredictability, and unnecessary duplication in relation to the environmental assessment process, our members and the economy of Canada are both adversely affected.

CCA members remain extremely supportive of environmental assessment and believe it can be an important contributor to sustainable development in Canada. But our membership is greatly concerned about matters relating to the efficiency and effectiveness of the administration of the CEA Act, and the uncertainty and unpredictability of its implementation. That is why our association fully supports the amendments the government made to the CEA Act through clause 20 of Bill C-9 and the issuance of the establishing timelines for comprehensive studies regulations. We are therefore before you today to provide some additional recommendations on the CEA Act for how it can be further improved.

I will now turn to Mr. Barnes to outline the position of the CCA, as outlined in more detail in our written submission.

Message from the Senate
Royal Assent

June 26th, 2011 / 8:50 p.m.
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Conservative

The Acting Speaker Barry Devolin

I have the honour to inform the House that when the House did attend Her Honour, the deputy of His Excellency the Governor General in the Senate chamber, Her Honour was pleased to give, in Her Majesty's name, the royal assent to the following bills:

Bill C-3, An Act to implement certain provisions of the 2011 budget as updated on June 6, 2011--Chapter 15.

Bill C-2, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (mega-trials)--Chapter 16.

Bill C-6, An Act to provide for the resumption and continuation of postal services--Chapter 17.

Bill C-8, An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the financial year ending March 31, 2012--Chapter 18.

Bill C-9, An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the financial year ending March 31, 2012--Chapter 19.

Bill S-1001, An Act respecting Queen's University at Kingston.

It being 8:50 p.m., the House stands adjourned until Monday, September 19, 2011, at 11 a.m., pursuant to Standing Orders 28(2) and 24(1).

(The House adjourned at 8:50 p.m.)

Supplementary Estimates (A), 2011-12
Government Orders

June 22nd, 2011 / 7:25 p.m.
See context

Conservative

Tony Clement Parry Sound—Muskoka, ON

moved that Bill C-9, An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the financial year ending March 31, 2012, be read the second time and referred to a committee of the whole.

Supplementary Estimates (A), 2011-12
Government Orders

June 22nd, 2011 / 7:25 p.m.
See context

Conservative

Tony Clement Parry Sound—Muskoka, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-9, An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the financial year ending March 31, 2012.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)