Evidence of meeting #38 for Public Safety and National Security in the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament’s site, as are the minutes.) The winning word was offender.

A recording is available from Parliament.

On the agenda

MPs speaking

Also speaking

  • Howard Sapers  Correctional Investigator, Office of the Correctional Investigator
  • Marie-France Kingsley  Director of Investigations, Office of the Correctional Investigator
  • Catherine Kane  Director General and Senior General Counsel, Criminal Law Policy Section, Department of Justice
  • Elissa Lieff  Director General and Senior General Counsel, Family, Children and Youth Section, Department of Justice

4:20 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Portage—Lisgar, MB

Okay.

Constitutionality had been our initial reason for wanting to get some input. I guess there would probably be a variety of opinions from a variety of legal experts possibly on the constitutionality of any given bill or piece of legislation. Anyway, I'll leave it at that.

Are you able to speak to the following, because we do hear some concerns about it and it wasn't quite clear to me. If an inmate is serving his or her sentence in a certain province and if regulations for collection, whether maintenance collection or any types of collection, differ by province, would the inmate have to be resident of the specific province where they're serving their sentence or would they be resident wherever their permanent address was before they were incarcerated?

4:20 p.m.

Director General and Senior General Counsel, Criminal Law Policy Section, Department of Justice

Catherine Kane

If a restitution order or a surcharge order were outstanding, that's a debt that's owed to the province because a surcharge is collected by the province. So the province that would be seeking the surcharge revenue from the offender would likely be waiting for that offender to be released and returned to the jurisdiction where the surcharge was imposed, to then proceed with collection efforts in the event it wasn't paid while the offender was in the institution or before the offender entered the institution. It's more a practical matter than a matter of where the offender is deemed to be a resident. But there would be civil enforcement remedies that could be transferred from one jurisdiction to the other if the province wanted to take those steps to try to enforce the civil order—a debt—from one province in another province.

4:20 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Portage—Lisgar, MB

Would that be the same for child support or spousal support? It might be Ms. Lieff who could answer this.

4:20 p.m.

Elissa Lieff Director General and Senior General Counsel, Family, Children and Youth Section, Department of Justice

With respect to support, there is interjurisdictional support legislation that allows one province to deal with another province in terms of collection. I can't speak specifically to how the provinces deal with offenders, but there's legislation that exists. Where one parent resides in one jurisdiction and another parent resides in another jurisdiction, and there's support owing, the provinces work together to collect that.

May 8th, 2012 / 4:20 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Portage—Lisgar, MB

Yes, and I think that's where we've seen the challenge when we're talking about offenders.

When we're talking about people who aren't offenders and who are living in general society, there are ways for spousal support and child support to be collected. We've heard some conflicting testimony, but I think, by and large, what we've heard, unfortunately, is that there is no mechanism for offenders to be forced specifically to pay child support, spousal support, and then it goes on. We heard testimony in terms of restitution or other outstanding moneys that are owed.

Here's another question on something that we've heard come up as well. One of the witnesses we had, Mr. Toller from CSC, mentioned that if legal counsel determined there was a legal basis to consider that CSC might be liable, and if they've incurred damages, then an out-of-court settlement might be reached. Do you know whether out-of-court settlements would be included in the monetary awards that are affected by Bill C-350?

4:25 p.m.

Director General and Senior General Counsel, Criminal Law Policy Section, Department of Justice

Catherine Kane

As I read the bill, as drafted, I had assumed that it was only awards made by a court. The bill does raise a few questions, so I can't speak with authority because I'm not as familiar with the bill as perhaps my colleagues from Public Safety, who have already appeared, would have indicated.

I had thought we were speaking of court orders rather than settlements. I had thought that was the intention. It's not for me to say what the sponsor's intention in the bill was, but that was what I gleaned from reading the bill.

4:25 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Portage—Lisgar, MB

That's what you brought out of it.

4:25 p.m.

Director General and Senior General Counsel, Criminal Law Policy Section, Department of Justice

4:25 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Portage—Lisgar, MB

Okay. Thank you very much.

That's all I have, Mr. Chair.

4:25 p.m.

NDP

The Vice-Chair Randall Garrison

Is there anyone else? We have two minutes remaining on the government side.

Mr. Rathgeber.

4:25 p.m.

Conservative

Brent Rathgeber Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

Thank you.

Thank you to the witnesses.

Constitutionality aside, Ms. Kane, or Ms. Lieff, do you have any thoughts regarding priorities with respect to federal bankruptcy legislation or provincial enforcement with respect, not so much to maintenance enforcement—because this regime attempts to give priority to maintenance orders and child support orders—but to provincial enforcement under a writ of execution or a garnishee summons? Who would take priority when there's conflict in claims? Or do you know, because I don't?

4:25 p.m.

Director General and Senior General Counsel, Family, Children and Youth Section, Department of Justice

Elissa Lieff

I can't comment on what the interaction would be between federal and provincial legislation with respect to that, and I'm not an expert in the federal bankruptcy legislation as well.

My understanding of the federal bankruptcy legislation is that there is a certain amount of support debt that's recognized off the top. So you sit above the unsecured creditors and then the obligations do not die with being released from bankruptcy. The support obligations continue, but how the interplay between the legislation would work otherwise and beyond that, I can't comment.

4:25 p.m.

Conservative

Brent Rathgeber Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

Do you think the exemptions under provincial execution creditors legislation would apply, that a debtor is allowed so much in terms of real property and so much in terms of personal property? Do you think those exemptions would apply?

4:25 p.m.

Director General and Senior General Counsel, Family, Children and Youth Section, Department of Justice

Elissa Lieff

That's not my area of expertise.

4:25 p.m.

Director General and Senior General Counsel, Criminal Law Policy Section, Department of Justice

Catherine Kane

It's not mine either.