House of Commons Hansard #250 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was health.

Topics

Immigration
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Immigration
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Brian Tobin Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte, NL

Bravo. The Reform Party might have to learn to live with a no. That will be tough.

Immigration
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Sergio Marchi York West, ON

Mr. Speaker, our Prime Minister has made it abundantly clear that change has been a defining characteristic of this government.

With respect to immigration, we have not only talked about change, we have actually gone out there and done it. There happen to be seven provincial agreements with the federal government on immigration. We are actively negotiating with the three other provinces that do not have an agreement. British Columbia and Manitoba are already well entrained and Ontario is advancing very nicely.

We also talked to the provinces about renewing the way we integrate, so we will be moving from a position of not only Ottawa knows best, but going local, because if it does not happen locally it does not work nationally.

We have talked to the provinces and we are working with the provinces on promotion and recruitment from abroad and also with respect to giving additional powers to the provinces.

We will have more to say when we announce the levels on Wednesday afternoon.

Immigration
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Reform

Val Meredith Surrey—White Rock—South Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is encouraging to hear that the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration is willing to let the provinces have more control in immigration.

I would like to know if the minister, when he announces the immigration projections for the new year on Wednesday, is going to allow the provinces to have input in the immigration levels of their provinces.

Immigration
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Sergio Marchi Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, not only will they have input from Wednesday on, I have actually discussed with and written to every one of my provincial counterparts to consult with them as to what the numbers ought to be and, beyond the numbers, what categories there should be in this country and what kind of latitude the provinces should have.

For instance, with Manitoba, along with the Minister of Human Resources Development, we have been discussing very intensely in the last number of days and weeks its need for garment workers. That is not solely an immigration matter, not solely an HRD matter, and not only a matter for the province; it is a matter for governments in general to get their collective acts together.

We are moving in the right direction. We recognize that it is a shared jurisdiction. I would hope the hon. member would stand up and applaud our efforts.

Youth Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Janko Peric Cambridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, I understand there has been an evaluation done on Youth Service Canada. Can the Secretary of State for Training and Youth provide us with some of the highlights of this report?

Youth Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Winnipeg South Centre
Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Minister of Human Resources Development and Minister of Western Economic Diversification

Mr. Speaker, normally I would want the secretary of state to give the answer because she has done yeoman's service in ensuring that the young people of this country have been provided with new opportunities for employment. However, in her absence, as it comes under my general responsibilities, I would like to answer.

At this time we have over 200 projects operating in the country in which young people have been given an opportunity for community experience as well as being able to earn a stipend so they can return to school. Over 80 per cent of the young people involved in the first year have indicated that they will be using the experience they have gained plus the honorarium they have earned to return to school, to start their own businesses, or to gain further employment.

It shows that when we give young people a chance in this country, they are not the problem; they are the solution.

Aboriginal Land Claims
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Reform

John Duncan North Island—Powell River, BC

Mr. Speaker, according to polls the number one issue in British Columbia is aboriginal issues. Among the provincial political parties there is a growing divergence of views on aboriginal issues.

With the current lame duck NDP administration in the waning days of its mandate, will the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development assure the House that he will not entertain completion of any comprehensive agreements, such as the Nisga'a claim, until there is a new administration with a fresh mandate?

Aboriginal Land Claims
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Sault Ste. Marie
Ontario

Liberal

Ron Irwin Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, this government is prepared to entertain anything on which there has been consultation, which looks feasible, which will result in something better than when we started, and which takes into consideration the history of the aboriginal people. I see nothing in the proposal of the Reform Party that suggests that it has adhered to any of those four criteria.

The Nisga'a have been waiting almost 80 years for justice, and now the Reform member is saying do not do anything until the non-Nisga'a government changes in British Columbia. To do the honourable thing, we should move ahead.

I want to point out that the native people in this country have expressed their love for Canada in the last week by the Montagnais voting 99 per cent no, the Inuit voting 95 per cent no, and the Cree voting 96.3 per cent no. Do we treat them and their sense of feeling for this country by saying do not deal with them, but wait for the next provincial election? My answer to the hon. member is no, absolutely not.

Aboriginal Land Claims
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

John Duncan North Island—Powell River, BC

Mr. Speaker, this month the B.C. Minister of Aboriginal Affairs publicly stated that settling B.C. land claims will cost $10 billion. The federal minister's department this month estimated costs of $5 billion. My numbers tally with those of the provincial minister.

When there are radically different estimates on such a critical issue, does the minister not agree that the public deserves financial transparency and a cost-benefit analysis on this issue?

Aboriginal Land Claims
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Sault Ste. Marie
Ontario

Liberal

Ron Irwin Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, what the public needs is some straight talk from the Reform Party.

The member for Athabasca, who sits on the Reform Party's policy committee, said: "The Europeans came to this country 300 years ago, opened it up and settled it. Because we did not kill the Indians and have Indian wars does not mean we did not conquer these people. If they were not in fact conquered then why did the aboriginal people allow themselves to be herded into little reserves in the most isolated, desolate, worthless parts of this country?" That is what has happened in B.C., Mr. Speaker.

The hon. member now says we should not do anything. Well now is not the time to take that position. I wish the Reform Party would support the BCTC legislation, which they may, so we can start negotiating and doing the job we were elected for: to support the very people the Reform Party represents. This hon. member has half a dozen to a dozen First Nations in his riding. It is about time he realized that they are Canadians and voters and they have grievances that we must begin to resolve.

Medicare
Oral Question Period

October 30th, 1995 / 2:55 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Deputy Prime Minister.

The Deputy Prime Minister talked earlier about fighting for medicare. I do not doubt the Deputy Prime Minister's commitment to medicare. However, I would like to ask her a question. Do she and the government not see that if this government continues the trend toward unilateral withdrawal of the federal government from the fiscal partnership that medicare also was-it was not just a partnership with respect to standards and services-they will be unable to maintain national standards because they will lose the critical moral edge they need and the Reform Party will win by default?

We have to fund medicare as well as fight for it. When will this government start funding medicare so that we can save it?

Medicare
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Sudbury
Ontario

Liberal

Diane Marleau Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, we have stated unequivocally that we would continue to fund medicare in this country with stable, ongoing funding.

There are many myths out there, and one has to do with the decrease in funding by the federal government. Since we have been in power, we have not decreased the funding at all.

Let me give the member an example of what is happening in Alberta in terms of our share of funding for health care expenditures. When we took office, the level of federal funding in Alberta was 33 per cent of their health care expenditures. The following year it rose to 37 per cent of their health care expenditures. This year federal funding for health care in Alberta, as our share of their spending, will be 40.6 per cent.

Environment
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Paul Forseth New Westminster—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is on the environment. On Friday we were assured in the House that the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment draft environmental framework would be released for public discussion.

Can the government inform us of this discussion schedule and the implementation time frame that will make this agreement a reality instead of another paper proposal?

Environment
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the ministers agreed unanimously at the meeting in Whitehorse to release the document. We are ready at the federal level. We are speaking with our provincial colleagues and hope it will be released within a few days.