House of Commons Hansard #101 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was international.

Topics

The Late Tom Bell
Oral Question Period

3:20 p.m.

The Speaker

Colleagues, I inadvertently did not see one of our colleagues who wanted to pay tribute to Joe Ghiz. Would you give me permission to re-open tributes to Mr. Ghiz?

The Late Tom Bell
Oral Question Period

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

The Late Hon. Joe Ghiz
Oral Question Period

November 18th, 1996 / 3:20 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Elsie Wayne Saint John, NB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today on behalf of my colleague, the hon. member for Sherbrooke, and the Progressive Conservative Party to pay tribute to the late Joe Ghiz.

We wish to extend our heartfelt condolences to Mr. Ghiz's wife Rose Ellen, his mother Marguerite and his children Robert and Joanne.

The nation shares in their grief. Canadians strongly admired Mr. Ghiz's commitment to the people of Prince Edward Island and the people of Canada. Canada has lost one of our strongest defenders.

Mr. Ghiz became leader of the official opposition in 1982 and premier from 1986 to 1993. Following his departure from public politics, he was appointed as a provincial supreme court judge.

He will be remembered in Prince Edward Island as the man who signed the deal that built a bridge from the island to the mainland. It was one of Mr. Ghiz's dreams but he built many bridges in our Canada of today.

Across Canada he will be remembered for his tireless support of the Meech Lake and Charlottetown accords and his support of a united Canada. The failure of both accords was a severe blow to him. Yet despite these setbacks he was always viewed by islanders and Canadians from coast to coast as a winner.

It is always tragic when someone leaves us so young. This country has lost a great Canadian too soon.

Members of the Progressive Conservative Party extend their prayers to the family of Joe Ghiz. He was a great man and he will be greatly missed.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I am honoured to table in both official languages the government's response to 16 petitions.

Ways And Means
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Scarborough East
Ontario

Liberal

Doug Peters Secretary of State (International Financial Institutions)

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 83(1), I wish to table a notice of ways and means motion to amend the Income Tax Act. I am also tabling explanatory notes and I ask that an order of the day be designated for consideration of this motion.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Liberal

Andy Mitchell Parry Sound—Muskoka, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the second report of the Standing Committee on Natural Resources entitled "Streamlining Environmental Regulation for Mining: Final Report", an interim report having been tabled in December 1995.

The report reiterates the government's commitment to protection of the environment and suggests a number of initiatives to encourage mining investment through greater regulatory clarity, certainty and efficiency.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response thereto within 150 days.

User Fee Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Reform

Monte Solberg Medicine Hat, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-349, an act to provide for parliamentary scrutiny and approval of user fees set by federal authority and to require public disclosure of the amount collected as user fees.

Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to rise today to introduce my private member's bill, the user fee act. In the last 10 years user fees have doubled in the amount the government collects.

Many people are concerned that in the last several years as the public service has come under increased scrutiny, many government agencies are using their abilities to increase user fees to become profit centres for the government. In doing that they avoid being chopped. This is a big concern of many people and myself.

In the 1993 auditor general's report it is stated: "We are concerned that Parliament cannot readily scrutinize the user fees established by contracts and other non-regulatory means. There does not exist a government-wide summary of the fees being charged, the revenues raised and the authorities under which they are established".

Probably the best example of how user pay without user say has gone awry is the case of the Pest Management Regulatory Agency. Its budget has gone from $14.2 million in 1994 to $34 million in 1996, chiefly because there has not been parliamentary scrutiny of what is going on in bodies like this.

I would urge my fellow colleagues to read the legislation and if they have questions to contact me and hopefully they will ultimately support it.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have three petitions to present today.

The first is from Saint John, New Brunswick. The petitioners would like to draw to the attention of the House that police and firefighters place their lives at risk on a daily basis as they serve the emergency needs of all Canadians.

They also state that in many cases the families are left without sufficient financial means to meet their obligations.

The petitioners therefore pray and call on Parliament to establish a public safety officers compensation fund to receive gifts and bequests for the benefit of families of police officers and firefighters who are killed in the line of duty.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the second petition comes from Oshawa, Ontario.

The petitioners would like to draw to the attention of the House that managing the family home and caring for preschool children is an honourable profession which has not been recognized for its value to our society.

The petitioners therefore pray and call on Parliament to pursue initiatives to assist families that choose to provide care in the home for preschool children, the chronically ill, the aged of the disabled.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the final petition comes from Mount Albert, Ontario.

The petitioners would like to draw to the attention of the House that the consumption of alcoholic beverages may cause health problems or impair one's ability, and specifically, that fetal alcohol syndrome or other alcohol related birth defects are 100 per cent preventable by avoiding alcohol consumption during pregnancy.

The petitioners therefore pray and call on Parliament to enact legislation to require health warning labels to be placed on the containers of all alcoholic beverages to caution expectant mothers and others of the risks associated with alcohol consumption.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Reform

Bill Gilmour Comox—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36, I am pleased to present the following petition from my constituents of Comox-Alberni.

There are 4,028 signatures here for a total of 5,528 signatures of petitioners from my riding. That represents 10 per cent of the voters in my riding, a significant number.

The petitioners request that Parliament allow Canadian citizens to vote directly in a national binding referendum on the restoration of the death penalty for first degree murder.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Liberal

Gary Pillitteri Niagara Falls, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise pursuant to Standing Order 36 to present a petition that has been certified correct in form and content.

The petitioners, residents of Niagara Falls and the Niagara peninsula, are calling on Parliament to urge the federal government to join with the provincial government to make the operation of a national highway system possible.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition signed by more than 1,700 citizens of Peterborough county, mainly residents of the townships of Belmont-Methuen and Asphodel and the villages of Havelock and Norwood.

These are quite isolated communities which tend to fall between the cracks in terms of police and telephone services. A pedophile was recently released into one of these communities.

The petitions ask that the legislation be changed so that repeat sex offenders are never released from any correctional facility. Changing the legislation would prevent a repeat offender from moving into any neighbourhood.

I urge the government to move forward with Bill C-55.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Reform

Daphne Jennings Mission—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to present two petitions.

The first one is that the petitioners are concerned about the 7 per cent GST, that it is an unjust taxation of reading materials. They urge all levels of government to demonstrate their support of education and literacy by eliminating the sales tax from reading materials. That is from petitioners in British Columbia.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:35 p.m.

Reform

Daphne Jennings Mission—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, the second petition is pursuant to Standing Order 36. It asks Parliament to proceed immediately with amendments to the Criminal Code that will ensure that the sentence given to anyone convicted of causing death by driving while impaired carries a minimum sentence of seven years and a maximum of 14 years as outlined in the private member's Bill C-201 sponsored by the Reform member from Prince George-Bulkley Valley.