House of Commons Hansard #26 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Interparliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Liberal

Bob Speller Haldimand—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise, pursuant to Standing Order 34, to present to the House a report from the Canadian branch of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association concerning a visit to New Zealand which took place February 23 to March 2, 1996.

Interparliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Liberal

Réginald Bélair Cochrane—Superior, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34(1), I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report of the official parliamentary delegation to the Canada-France Interparliamentary Association, which attended the 26th annual meeting of the association held in Paris and Strasbourg from January 20 to 28, 1996.

Foreign Aid Restriction Act
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-263, an act respecting restriction on foreign aid.

Mr. Speaker, this bill was introduced in the last session. It was designed to stop the flow of financial or other aid to any foreign country that refuses to accept re-entry of its nationals or former nationals deported from Canada.

Far too often when foreign born criminals are ordered deported from Canada, deportation is hampered because some countries do not want to take back their nationals.

The foreign aid restriction act addresses this issue by freezing aid to countries that frustrate the Canadian deportation process. This bill is a strong measure to ensure an effective deportation policy in Canada. If a country will not take back its citizens who have committed criminal acts in Canada or who have misrepresented their past involvement in organized criminal activity, terrorism or other activities as noted under section 19 of the Immigration Act and are ordered deported, the bill would then direct the Department of Foreign Affairs to suspend all foreign aid to that country.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Senator Selection Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Reform

Jim Abbott Kootenay East, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-264, an act to allow the electors of a province to express an opinion on who should be summoned to the Senate to represent the province.

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to introduce my private member's bill, an act to allow the electors of a province to express an opinion on who should be summoned to the Senate to represent the province.

The Reform Party's ultimate objective has always been true Senate reform: a triple-E Senate elected, effective and equal. We can change the method of appointing senators, that is, they be elected, without constitutional revision.

This bill will change the method of appointing senators through an election process without constitutional revision. It will require that the Prime Minister wait to receive the expression of opinion from any province with a senatorial selection act similar to the Alberta senatorial selection act which resulted in Senator Stan Waters being appointed to the Senate.

The current Senate has not been able to perform its role effectively because the selection process has undermined its legitimacy.

There is considerable urgency for the introduction of this bill now because the Government of Canada is cramming through legislation that is not widely accepted.

I am introducing this bill today as a result of the forced vote held last fall on Bill C-110. The long range interest of Canadian federalism will truly be served by Senate reform.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have several petitions, the first bearing 126 names.

The petitioners pray that Parliament act immediately to extend protection to the unborn child by amending the Criminal Code to extend the same protection enjoyed by born human beings to unborn human beings.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

The second petition, Mr. Speaker, bears 176 signatures.

The petitioners pray that Parliament not repeal or amend section 241 of the Criminal Code in any way and to uphold the Supreme Court of Canada decision of September 30, 1993 to disallow assisted suicide or euthanasia.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, the third petition bears 275 signatures.

The petitioners again call on Parliament to give immediate consideration to the removal of section 745 of the Criminal Code of Canada for the protection of all Canadians.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

The fourth petition, Mr. Speaker, bears 148 names.

The petitioners pray and request that Parliament not amend the human rights act or the charter of rights and freedoms in any way which would tend to indicate societal approval of same sex relationships or of homosexuality, including amending the Canadian Human Rights Act to include in the prohibited grounds of discrimination the undefined phrase of sexual orientation.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Reform

Monte Solberg Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, I rise pursuant to Standing Order 36 to present a petition on behalf of the people of the Medicine Hat constituency.

The petitioners call on Parliament to preserve Canadian unity, parliamentary tradition and protect the rights of all the people of Canada by prevailing upon the Speaker of the House of Commons to recognize the Reform Party of Canada as the official opposition during the remainder of this Parliament.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson Burnaby—Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, a point of order. I wonder if I might seek the consent of the House to revert to the presentation of private members' bills.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is there consent to revert to private members' bills?

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Canadian Human Rights Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson Burnaby—Kingsway, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-265, an act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act (sexual orientation).

Mr. Speaker, I thank members of the House. The purpose of this bill is to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act to include sexual orientation as a prohibited ground of discrimination within federal jurisdiction. It would extend to gay, lesbian and bisexual people in Canada not special rights but equal rights.

In closing, I would note that since 1986 seven ministers of justice as well as the current Prime Minister have all promised this legislative change. The Canadian Human Rights Commission has asked for it. The Senate has passed it and the Ontario Court of Appeal has ordered it. It is time for Parliament to act.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Secretary of State (Veterans)(Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency)

Mr. Speaker, I ask that all questions be allowed to stand.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is there consent to allow all questions to stand?