House of Commons Hansard #61 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was english.

Topics

Report Of Information Commissioner
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

The Speaker

I have the honour, pursuant to section 38 of the Access to Information Act, to lay upon the table the report of the information commissioner for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1996.

The report is permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Legal Affairs.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table in both official languages the government's response to six petitions.

Inter-Parliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Liberal

Raymond Bonin Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34, I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report of the Canadian section of the International Assembly of French-Speaking Parliamentarians, as well as the financial report regarding the meeting of the co-operation and development commission of this organization, held in Ouagadougou, in Burkina Faso, on March 22 and 23, 1996.

Canada Elections Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Anna Terrana Vancouver East, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-307, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act (polling hours).

Mr. Speaker, today I am introducing a bill entitled an act to amend the Canada Elections Act (polling hours). As you know, Canada is a huge country, with great distances, which does not make life easier for Canadians although it does make it more interesting.

One of the major problems is distance. Even though the CBC broadcasts the same message at the same time from the Atlantic, to the Pacific, to the Arctic, when we wake up in Vancouver, we know that Canadians in St. John's, Newfoundland, have already had lunch.

The time difference is a big problem on election day. Shortly after 4 p.m. in Vancouver, we know the results in Atlantic Canada, and shortly after 5 p.m., we know what the situation is in Quebec and Ontario. In British Columbia and in western Canada, where there are fewer MPs, this means that, depending on the results, the outcome has already been decided in eastern and central Canada.

The bill proposes to have all polling stations, from Newfoundland to British Columbia, close at the same time, taking the time difference into account, which would give the west the possibility of having a say in the future of the country together with the other provinces.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Canada Elections Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Anna Terrana Vancouver East, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-308, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act (polling stations in hospitals).

Mr. Speaker, today I would also like to introduce a private member's bill entitled an act to amend the Canada Elections Act, polling stations in hospitals).

Although in the current act, section 138, there is a provision for elections to be held in a sanitarium, a home for the aged, a chronic

care hospital or a similar institution for the care and treatment of tuberculosis and other chronic diseases, nothing in the act gives patients in hospitals an opportunity to vote.

Apparently this service is already provided but there is no indication of it in the elections act. I would therefore like to introduce a bill that would ensure all patients in hospitals during an election have the same privileges as all Canadians.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Food And Drugs Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Paddy Torsney Burlington, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-309, an act to amend the Food and Drugs Act (ingredients of food sold in restaurants).

Mr. Speaker, thank you for the opportunity to introduce this important piece of legislation. As members know, thousands of Canadians suffer from serious food allergies and are unable to freely enjoy one of the simple pleasures most of us take for granted, a meal in a restaurant.

For these Canadians, full ingredient disclosure of a restaurant's menu items can mean the difference between good health and serious illness, between life and death.

The bill promotes greater awareness of the issue of food allergies throughout the restaurant industry and minimizes the health risks faced by food allergy sufferers. It was developed on the initiative of Mrs. Betty Lou Taylor of Burlington and is supported by over 100,000 Burlington residents. It follows many months of consultation with the restaurant industry, the medical profession, groups representing allergy sufferers and members of Parliament.

I would like to dedicate this bill to the memory of Christian Taylor, a young many in my riding of Burlington who passed away on June 23, 1987 at the age of 17 after eating an apple turnover secretly flavoured with crushed hazelnuts.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Food And Drugs Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Presenting petitions.

Food And Drugs Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Reform

Werner Schmidt Okanagan Centre, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is my privilege to present on behalf of well over 500 petitioners from Kelowna-

Food And Drugs Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

NDP

John Solomon Regina—Lumsden, SK

Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. I have four private member's bills to introduce today. I was obviously not recognized. Could we revert to that before petitions?

Food And Drugs Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

There has never been a mistake made by Chair. Perhaps there was not notice. Who knows what happened. We will revert with permission to private members' bills.

Food And Drugs Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Parliament Of Canada Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

NDP

John Solomon Regina—Lumsden, SK

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-310, an act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act (meetings of the Board of Internal Economy).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to introduce an act to amend the Canada of Parliament Act, meetings of the Board of Internal Economy. As parliamentarians know, the Board of Internal Economy is a very secretive operation. The public is not allowed to attend meetings. These are very important meetings because decisions are taken by the board which cost taxpayers a lot of money and there is no transparency or accountability with respect to its decisions.

The purpose of the bill is to allow members with a particular interest to attend and take part in meetings of the Board of Internal Economy of the House of Commons. The bill makes board meetings public with the exception of those devoted to certain specific topics. This follows up on many other jurisdictions in Canada which have made their boards of internal economy meetings public.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Patent Act
Routine Proceedings

June 13th, 1996 / 10:10 a.m.

NDP

John Solomon Regina—Lumsden, SK

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-311, an act to amend to amend the Patent Act.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to introduce a bill entitled an act to amend the Patent Act. The bill will limit the life of patents for medicines to 17 years and allow for compulsory licences to be granted for the manufacture and sale of medicines after the original patentee has had the medicine approved for marketing for four years.

It also takes into account that the royalty rate is to take into account the amount of medical research carried out in Canada by the applicant and the patentee. There is a provision for refusal or deferral of licence if a patentee has been unusually delayed in commercializing a medicine.

In essence the bill addresses Bill C-91, which has caused prescription drugs to skyrocket in costs. It has affected our medical care system by driving up costs of hospital prescription drugs and

other drugs as well as to individual users. This will allow fairer competition with respect to prescription drugs in the marketplace.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Members Of Parliament Retiring Allowances Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

NDP

John Solomon Regina—Lumsden, SK

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-312, an act to amend the Members of Parliament Retiring Allowances Act (money purchase pension).

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to once again introduce an act to amend the Members of Parliament Retiring Allowances Act, money purchase pension.

This bill addresses many concerns in Canada about the cost of members of Parliament pensions. It follows up on Saskatchewan's lead in 1979 when the Saskatchewan legislature pension plan was changed from a defined benefit to a defined contribution or money purchase. It will save Canadians about $7 million or $8 million a year. It will also provide a fair pension system for members of Parliament.

This sort of plan has been endorsed by the National Assistance Coalition and the Canadian Taxpayers Federation. It will take effect as soon as the bill is passed.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Parliament Of Canada Act
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

NDP

John Solomon Regina—Lumsden, SK

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-313, an act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act (other pension income).

Mr. Speaker, my fourth and final bill this morning is an act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act (other pension income).

The purpose of this bill is to require all pension or retiring allowance payments received by a member of Parliament that are paid from public funds to be deducted from the member's sessional allowance. What this does is it eliminates the real double dipping.

Many members of Parliament receive pension funds from municipal, provincial or federal governments, boards, agencies, commissions, teachers' pensions and so on. They come to this House and talk about the salaries being too high. This will save the taxpayers a number of dollars because a number of members receive both public pension income and an MP's pension both of which are paid by the same taxpayer. My view is that this bill should be adopted to eliminate that as much as possible.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)