House of Commons Hansard #77 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was vancouver.

Topics

The Late Bert Hargrave
Oral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

Lethbridge
Alberta

Reform

Ray Speaker Lethbridge

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Reform Party I would certainly like to pay tribute to someone I thought was a great man, Bert Hargrave, a man respected by all people who knew him.

I was personally involved with Mr. Hargrave on a number of occasions, at a variety of meetings, a variety of delegations and a variety of presentations not only in the provincial legislature but in other meetings across the province dealing with agricultural issues.

Bert's constituency of Medicine Hat overlapped with the constituency of Little Bow, my provincial constituency, and as two elected persons, although not of the same political party, we often dealt with issues together.

One of the qualities of Bert Hargrave was that he was able to step over partisan barriers and deal with issues in a very common sense way. In my memories of Bert Hargrave that will be the marquee of his gentlemanly, sophisticated and rational way of dealing with responsible matters for his constituents in southern Alberta.

If we recall part of Bert's history, he was born in 1917 in Medicine Hat and attended school in that city. He received a bachelor of science in agricultural engineering from the University of Saskatchewan in 1942. Bert served the country in World War II in the Canadian army RCEME corps from 1942 to 1946, serving in northwest Europe.

After returning he married Amy Reinhart and they lived near Walsh, Alberta. Often in our conversations we talked about the beautiful rolling hills, that gem of the southeastern part of our province of Alberta.

Bert was an active member of the agricultural society, in particular the cattle industry. Once in a while I would say to Bert: "You come to meetings and you are so proud that you would even wear a little bit of that on your shoes for us". He was known for that. He was certainly an active member of the Canadian Cattlemen's Association and gave that organization good leadership.

Entering politics was something that Bert had not really thought about until the early 1970s when he became increasingly concerned over Canadian agricultural policy. Thus at that time he sought the Progressive Conservative nomination for Medicine Hat. He never looked back, winning in 1972 by a margin of 5,600 votes, and won re-election in 1974, 1979 and 1980.

In 1979 he was appointed as the parliamentary secretary to the minister of agriculture where his firsthand knowledge of agricultural issues and his common sense shone through. He fought for the average farmer, whether it was urging tax relief for drought stricken farmers or fighting for the rights of cattle farmers against U.S. beef bans or the injustice of the Crow rate.

Bert retired from Canadian politics in 1984, citing his own failing health and the loss of his beloved wife one year earlier. He returned to his farm which was never far from his heart but kept abreast of federal politics. Bert served as a member of the senate of the University of Lethbridge during the period when my wife Ingrid was the chancellor. He made a common sense contribution to the institution's success.

In 1993 he was inducted into the Alberta Agricultural Hall of Fame. He lived on his farm until this past June when he moved to the Central Park Lodge in Medicine Hat. He passed away in his room on Tuesday, September 24, 1996. Bert is survived by his son and his daughter and four grandchildren.

On behalf of the Reform Party of Canada I would like to extend my sincere sympathies to his family and his friends. Our thoughts and prayers are with you as you remember Bert this afternoon.

Order In Council Appointments
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table, in both official languages, a number of order in council appointments which were made by the government.

Pursuant to the provisions of Standing Order 110(1), these are deemed referred to the appropriate standing committees, a list of which is attached.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to one petition.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present the 32nd report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs regarding the associate membership of some committees.

If the House gives its consent, I intend to move concurrence in the 32nd report later this day.

An Act To Establish National Standards Across Canada For Education Provided By The Provinces
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-328, an act to establish national standards across Canada for education provided by the provinces.

Mr. Speaker, the purpose of this bill is to establish national standards for education through a consultative process among governments, educational professionals, industry, labour, parent use, voluntary organizations and individual Canadians representing all sectors of the population, recognizing that education is a provincial responsibility.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

An Act To Establish National Literacy Standards Across Canada
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-329, an act to establish national literacy standards across Canada.

Mr. Speaker, the purpose of this bill is to provide for a process that would be a catalyst for the establishment of national standards for literacy through consultation. Nothing in this bill abrogates or derogates from the jurisdiction of a province. However, the bill calls on the minister responsible to consult with the provincial governments as well as with experts in the education and the literacy field, with representatives of business and labour and representatives of the media and literacy students.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Income Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-330, an act to amend the Income Tax Act (donors to food banks).

Mr. Speaker, this bill would permit the donation of food to a food bank to be treated as a charitable gift, notwithstanding that the value of the food has already been deducted as a business expense of the donor.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Income Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-331, an act to amend the Income Tax Act, (tax credit for mental or physical impairment).

Mr. Speaker, this bill would ensure that a taxpayer who has a physical or mental impairment that prevents him or her from performing housekeeping activities at his or her place of residence would be entitled to a tax credit under section 118.2 of the Income Tax Act for a portion of the remuneration paid to another person by the taxpayer for performing those activities.

Such tax credits would apply particularly to senior citizens provided that they establish through a medical certificate that they are incapable of performing housekeeping activities. Apart from some pay for the performance of housekeeping activities, the taxpayer would also be entitled to a tax credit for physical or mental impairment under section 118.3 of the act.

(Motion deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

September 30th, 1996 / 3:20 p.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, if the House gives its consent, I move that the 32nd report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented to the House earlier this day, be concurred in.

(Motion agreed to.)

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, if the House gives its consent, I move that the following member be added to the list of associate members of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs: John Solomon.

(Motion agreed to.)

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have three petitions on one issue signed by individuals in the national capital region and particularly in my riding of Ottawa Centre.

The petitioners call on Parliament to enact Bill C-205 to ensure that criminals do not profit financially from selling their stories of crimes committed.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Andrew Telegdi Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have three petitions I would like to present to the House.

The first petition deals with the issue of land mines. It makes the point that there are 100 million uncleared land mines affecting 64 countries and that an estimated 26,000 civilians are killed and injured by these mines annually.

Therefore, the petitioners ask Parliament to legislate a comprehensive ban on the production, export and trade or transfer of anti-personal land mines.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Andrew Telegdi Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, the second petition deals with Bill C-205 presented by the member for Scarborough West. This bill wants to outlaw criminals profiting from crime.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Andrew Telegdi Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, the third petition deals with the issue of euthanasia. It is against assisted suicide.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Jim Jordan Leeds—Grenville, ON

Mr. Speaker, I really appreciate you recognizing me way down here. It is a long way from where I am to where you are. I really attribute that to my not changing my hair over the summer. I left it pretty much the way it was. You see, if you do that you get recognized, not like some over here and quite a few around us here. It takes you a while to pick it up. The only thing that helps you along is the seating plan. I hope you have one there near you, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition from my riding which is very timely. The petitioners are very concerned about criminals profiting from their crimes.

I want to get serious for a minute. The hon. member for Scarborough West has a private member's bill before the House which suggests a law to prohibit criminals from profiting from their crimes, whether it be by writing books, producing tapes or the like. I want to lend my support in a very positive way to the suggestion that the law be changed to disallow that from happening.