House of Commons Hansard #8 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was quebec.

Topics

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, there have also been consultations regarding the following:

That the report of the Security Establishment Commissioner for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1997, laid upon the table April 24, 1997, be permanently referred to the Standing Committee on National Defence and Veterans Affairs.

Mr. Speaker, I also move:

That Standing Order 104(2) be amended in subsections (h) and (j) be deleting the word “sixteen” and substituting therefor the word “eighteen”.

This has to do with adding two members of Parliament to two different committees.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

The Speaker

Does the minister have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motions?

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

The Speaker

The House has heard the terms of the motions. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motions?

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

The Speaker

Agreed to and so ordered.

(Motions agreed to)

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

Reform

Ted White North Vancouver, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. Yesterday I rose on a point of order during Routine Proceedings after the member for Scarborough Southwest had introduced a private member's bill which in the previous Parliament passed all stages in both the House and the Senate. The process was interrupted by the calling of the election.

Yesterday I asked for the unanimous consent of the House to deem the bill to have passed all stages in the House once again. Consent was given except for one member of the Bloc who indicated that if I brought the matter up again today when there would have been time to study it overnight then we could revisit that unanimous consent.

I might ask, Mr. Speaker, if we might revisit now that unanimous consent to have that member's bill deemed to have passed all stages.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

The Speaker

Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to move this motion?

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

Reform

Ted White North Vancouver, BC

Mr. Speaker, for clarification purposes, the bill is to prevent criminals from making profit from the proceeds of crime from the writing of stories or the making of films having to do with their exploits in crime. I wanted to clarify it for all the members.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

The Speaker

The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

(Motion agreed to, bill read the second and third times and passed)

A message from His Excellency the Governor General transmitting estimates for the financial year ending March 31, 1998, was presented by the President of the Treasury Board and read by the Speaker to the House.

Main Estimates, 1997-98
Routine Proceedings

October 1st, 1997 / 3:30 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, I would also like to table again, in support of the estimates, part I, the government expenditure plan.

In addition I will table with the Clerk of the House, on behalf of my colleagues, part III of the estimates consisting of 78 departmental expenditure plans. These documents will be distributed to the members of the standing committees to facilitate their consideration of the spending authority requested in part II.

These documents are identical to the budget documents tabled in the House on February 20, 1997.

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Liberal

Tom Wappel Scarborough Southwest, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-224, an act to amend the Criminal Code (offence committed outside Canada).

Mr. Speaker, section 6(2) of the Criminal Code specifies that, with few exceptions such as war crimes, hostage taking and hijacking, persons are not to be convicted of offences committed outside Canada. This results in situations where, as has happened, two Canadians holidaying in the Caribbean assault another Canadian. At present there is no way of prosecuting those people in Canada.

If the authorities in the Caribbean do not proceed with a charge, the people get away with what would clearly be a crime if committed in Canada.

My bill closes this loophole by providing that any act or omission committed outside Canada, which if committed in Canada would constitute an offence under the Criminal Code, shall be deemed to have been committed in Canada if the perpetrator is a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident or is present in Canada after the commission of the act.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Marriage (Prohibited Degrees) Act
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Liberal

Tom Wappel Scarborough Southwest, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-225, an act to amend the Marriage (Prohibited Degrees) Act and the Interpretation Act.

Mr. Speaker, the purpose of the bill can be succinctly stated. It would ensure that the only valid marriage in Canada is between one man and one woman. There are a few cultures and religions in the world which allow multiple wives or husbands. That is not part of Canada's history, tradition or values.

There are one or two countries or states which either permit or are thinking of permitting persons of the same sex to marry. That is not part of Canada's history, tradition or values.

Canada's history, tradition and values are being challenged in our courts. The United States has already passed similar legislation to defend the institution of marriage. It is time for Canada to do the same.

The bill would ensure that marriage remains what Canadians have always known it to be: a legal union between an unmarried female and an unmarried male.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)