House of Commons Hansard #39 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was plan.

Topics

Pharmaceutical Industry
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Jean Charest Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, a few days ago, I wrote to the Premier of Quebec, Mr. Bouchard, and to the Leader of the Official Opposition, Daniel Johnson, asking that they take action on the issue of Bill C-91 and that they state clearly to the Government of Canada the position of the Government of Quebec.

Yesterday, Monique Gagnon-Tremblay, MNA for Saint-François, tabled the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted, and I quote:

That the National Assembly demand that the Federal Government not amend Federal Statute C-91, which refers to the pharmaceutical industry, in such a way that would weaken the said Statute and its rules, and this, in compliance with the international agreements reached with our commercial partners regarding the protection of intellectual property, and ascertain that Québec's pharmaceutical industry remain strong and competitive.

I hope that the Minister of Industry, the Minister of Health, the Prime Minister and everyone in the Liberal government are listening, because if they are not, the pharmaceutical industry will suffer everywhere in Canada, including Quebec.

Quebec Sovereignty
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, in May 1963, in its Speech from the Throne, the Pearson government recognized that Canada was a bilingual and multicultural country. In order to promote national unity, it called for co-operative federalism with the provinces. In the same breath, that government implemented a series of programs coming under provincial jurisdiction.

Thirty-four years later, in 1997, the Liberal government reiterates that Canada is still a bilingual and multicultural country. To enhance national unity, it is promoting a new orientation for federalism based on partnership with the provinces. Yet, we are faced with a new series of encroachments on programs under provincial jurisdiction.

History repeats itself. Flexible federalism means rigid status quo, it means going backwards. In Quebec, we want to go forward, we want real change. That is why we want sovereignty.

The Late Justice John Sopinka
Statements By Members

November 27th, 1997 / 2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Tony Valeri Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, this week as Canadians we have been reflecting on the remarkable life and accomplishments of one of Canada's finest legal minds, Supreme Court Justice John Sopinka.

Spending many of his younger years living in Stoney Creek, John Sopinka attended Salt Fleet High School between 1946 and 1951. There he excelled both as an athlete and as an academic student, graduating a valedictorian.

His leadership abilities were evident through his work as student council president, while his capacity for excellence took shape through his membership on Salt Fleet's football team and playing the violin with the Hamilton Symphony Orchestra.

Justice Sopinka brought his considerable talents to bear in all of his pursuits, whether it was in professional sports as a CFL athlete or within Canada's legal system. His reasoned legal opinions and his many insights on Canada's legal system will remain his legacy not only to his colleagues in the legal profession but to all Canadians.

As the son of hardworking parents who showed so much promise in those early years at Salt Fleet High, John Sopinka rose to the very heights of our society and enriched us all. Truly he will missed.

Canada Post
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, for 10 solid days now Canada's post office has been paralyzed by a strike. The CFIB says this strike is costing the average small business $240 a day or more than $2,000 lost per business since the strike began.

I just received a letter from a small outfit in Manitoba that has laid off four of its six employees. Its business is down 60% and the owner is remortgaging his house to pay the bills.

Will the prime minister legislate the post office back to work today?

Canada Post
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the parties are in negotiations at this moment. We hope they will find a solution. The mediator is doing his work. He is asking for more time and we have given him more time.

Canada Post
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, we and Canadians have been waiting for mediation to work for months. This is the fourth strike at the post office in 10 years. These negotiations have been going on for over seven months. It is the third federally appointed government conciliator who has become involved in this thing. The strike is costing up to $2 million to this point.

I ask the prime minister again why will he not legislate the postal workers back to work?

Canada Post
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Parliament of Canada decided a long time ago that public service employees working in the post office have the right to strike. They are exercising the right that Parliament has given to them at this moment.

Canada Post
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, getting nowhere with the prime minister, I wonder if we could ask the last question to the minister of public works.

Every now and then he pops up and says something about legislating the post office back to work. Then he goes back in his hole. It is like groundhog day, he pops up, sees his shadow and goes back in his hole.

I am wondering if the minister of public works, rather than whispering about back to work legislation, will stand up in the House today and introduce that legislation which he obviously has in his files.

Canada Post
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, it is unfortunate that my hon. colleague has to continually talk about legislation. He is well aware that all this does is hurt the process. We have appointed a highly qualified mediator. Let the mediator do his job and help us come up with a collective agreement, not trying to harm it by making it public.

Krever Report
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Krever report on tainted blood clearly indicates that the federal government played a major role in the tragedy.

Its first recommendation was to compensate victims immediately. When will the Minister of Health announce that this compensation will be paid? When?

Krever Report
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, it is clear that we have now received a summary, a very detailed report concerning what happened. We are most grateful to Justice Krever for his report. It will truly be an ongoing legacy to ensure the safety of Canadians.

As far as claims by victims are concerned, I have already made my position clear. I would prefer to avoid a decade of litigation. I will be working with my provincial and territorial counterparts to find solutions.

Krever Report
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Reform

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, he blocked Krever when he was trying to do his report and now he is blocking the victims.

The minister apologized and then said that the federal government was in fact involved and that he would act fully on the report. But by his vague answers on compensation, he now is hurting the victims. Would he prefer these victims of hepatitis C to drag their hospital beds into court where the lawyers will get most of their settlements, or will he give them a dignified compensation package before Christmas? Hepatitis C deserves better than this minister.

Krever Report
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I have made my views on the issue of compensation very clear. I do not think victim claims should be bogged down for 10, 12 or 15 years before the courts. At the same time we have received from Mr. Justice Krever some clear recommendations, some findings that include the past, the present and the future.

It is my intention to take up these matters in the very near future with my provincial counterparts. That is the place to start. We should have a concerted approach to these issues, and I shall be working toward that result.

Minister Of Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, in a statement that was both arrogant and without precedent, claimed that the question during the last referendum was a fraud.

I would like to ask the Prime Minister who, on the eve of the referendum, stated at Verdun that Quebeckers were going to make the most important decision of their lives, if he was inviting them to participate in a fraud.

Minister Of Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, it is clear that when we heard Mr. Parizeau's statement after the referendum, there was a very great difference between what was on paper and what the government intended.

I suspected there was a trap in this, and I asked Quebeckers to be careful.