House of Commons Hansard #131 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was flag.

Topics

Rwanda
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Minister for International Cooperation and Minister responsible for Francophonie

Mr. Speaker, I want to report to the House that the Government of Rwanda does not receive any funding from the Canadian International Development Agency. All our aid in that country and in most other

countries is provided to Canadian and multilateral non-governmental organizations.

Therefore if no money goes to the Government of Rwanda, no money-at least no Canadian money-can be redirected by the Government of Rwanda.

Airbus
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Chris Axworthy Saskatoon—Clark's Crossing, SK

Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Justice and it involves the communications strategic advice that he received under contract with a well known Liberal media company. The contract was for strategic communications advice to the minister on his legislative agenda. We all know that the Airbus was not on the minister's legislative agenda. Yet some $160,000 was paid to the Liberal media company under this contract.

Why did the minister pay for advice when it was not provided for under the contract? How much did he pay for advice on how he should handle himself in the Airbus affair while at the same time he was saying that he was uninvolved in the actual affair?

Airbus
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, it is remarkable how the hon. member seems prepared, indeed enthusiastic, about interpreting a contract he very likely has never seen which contains terms with which he is entirely unfamiliar and is using amounts he has picked up from the odd television report. It is remarkable how enthusiastic the member is.

The member will know because his question was already asked and answered, much more capably I might add. The amounts at issue were paid over legislative advice with respect to legislative initiatives and all services that were rendered were entirely within those contemplated properly by the contract.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

February 17th, 1997 / 3 p.m.

Reform

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley East, BC

Mr. Speaker, a point of order. I would like a clarification from you on the type of language being used on the government side during the course of question period.

During question period the Minister of Finance used two different phrases that I think have been ruled as unparliamentary language according to Beauchesne.

During question period the Minister of Finance referred to the leader of the third party and said "that he has not got the guts". Then he went to say "that he should not be misleading people".

Mr. Speaker, if you look on page 145 and 146 of Beauchesne they are both ruled as unparliamentary language. I would ask the minister to withdraw-

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

My colleague, as you well know and as all colleagues know, for the most part there are very few words that in and of themselves are not acceptable to the House but it does depend on the context in which they are used.

I quote you directly I believe with regard to using the term that one member "does not have the guts". I mentioned to you here in the House that no member of Parliament's courage-and that is what this refers to, this type of thing-is ever questioned in the House of Commons. I would hope that all hon. members would refrain from using words like that.

A far as the word "misleading", goes I listened to the words very carefully. I heard the word misleading used on both sides of the floor today. What I was looking for was in the tone, but on neither side did they say deliberately misleading. I would appeal to you not to use the word "misleading" because if it causes offence of any kind then we usually get a retaliation on the other side.

I appeal to you, my colleagues, that in the course of the question period and in the course of debate, we should refrain from using words like that. We are in an atmosphere where emotions are running very high and I would urge you to be very judicious in your choice of words. As far as these words today, I did not find them unparliamentary or I would have stated so.

I thank the hon. member for bringing this up as a point of order.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Reform

Jim Silye Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, a point of order.

This also arises out of question period today. It involves the finance minister who, in one of his answers, claimed that the leader of the Reform Party should not mislead the Canadian public. I take exception to his blatant misrepresentation.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Once again I encourage all hon. members not to use words like misleading in the House because we get one word and then a reaction from the other side.

I think the hon. member is getting into debate. He is welcome to join in any debate in the House. But I would judge this to be a point of debate rather than a point of order.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Reform

Jim Silye Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, a point of order.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Is this on the same point of order on which I just ruled?

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Reform

Jim Silye Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is on another point of order.

On another reply during question period, the finance minister said that the Reform's position on the MP pension plan was something. Our plan is to cancel-

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Once again, I rule that this is debate.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 30 petitions.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the privilege to present a petition calling on Parliament to ask the government to introduce some sort of an infrastructure program to deal with the infrastructure problems which exist across the country.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Godfrey Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present a petition which points out that the second phase of the National AIDS Strategy will expire on March 31, 1998. The petitioners request that Parliament ensure that dedicated AIDS funding beyond March 1998 be guaranteed and that the National AIDS Strategy be renewed now.

I support this petition from members of the public of Don Valley West.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Jim Jordan Leeds—Grenville, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition to present from constituents in places like Prescott, Brockville and surrounding areas.

The petitioners ask that the Prime Minister and the Parliament of Canada declare and confirm immediately that Canada is indivisible and that the boundaries of Canada, its provinces, territories and territorial waters may be modified only by (a), a free vote of all Canadian citizens as guaranteed by the Canadian charter or (b), through the amending formula as stipulated in the Canadian Constitution.