House of Commons Hansard #132 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was board.

Topics

Film Industry
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mary Clancy Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to rise in the House today to speak of this government's commitment to the film industry in Halifax.

Yesterday the member for Dartmouth and I were proud to announce the construction of three sound stages in the Halifax metropolitan area. The new production capability will help to meet the demand of Nova Scotia's growing film industry or as we call it at home, Hollywood North.

We have highly skilled trained professionals in the television and film industry both behind and in front of the camera. They love their craft, they are dedicated and they are successful. However, their success stems from the combined efforts of this government through ACOA in partnership with the provincial government and the private sector working together to turn a vision for the Halifax film industry into reality.

The Budget
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Raymond Lavigne Verdun—Saint-Paul, QC

Mr. Speaker, in a little over two hours, the Minister of Finance of Canada will bring down his fourth budget.

Since our government was elected in 1993, much has changed in this country, mainly for the better. Inflation is at its lowest level, interest rates and mortgage rates are at levels that are reasonable for consumers and more than 700,000 jobs have been created in Canada.

The deficit we inherited from the previous government has dropped considerably, and all major international institutions expect Canada to experience the strongest growth rate of all G-7 countries.

Canadians again have confidence in their government, and that is due to the excellent work done by the present Liberal government.

Archie Neil Chisholm
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Leblanc Cape Breton Highlands—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, Cape Breton, indeed all of Canada, lost a living legend with the passing last Friday of Archie Neil Chisholm.

At 89, Archie Neil had become the embodiment of the cultural revival taking place across Cape Breton Island and was among its most eloquent and colourful exponents. He was a master teacher,

entertainer, broadcaster and story teller, and a devotee of Cape Breton music. He contributed his talents generously to causes and charities too numerous to mention. No one could emcee a concert with the same grace and good humour as Archie Neil.

Archie Neil's life was a triumph of spirit over adversity. Born in a large family of modest means in the community of Margaree Forks, he was crippled by polio at an early age. But he overcame the disadvantages of humble beginnings, physical disability and other challenges to transform his life into an example of contribution to others.

I am proud to have known Archie Neil Chisholm and to have grown up in Margaree under his inspiring influence. Like so many of his friends, I will miss his cheerful presence.

The Budget
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley East, BC

Mr. Speaker, in advance of the federal budget I feel it is my duty to warn Canadians of the top 10 pick up lines that Liberals will use to try to seduce the Canadian voters.

Pick up line number 10: I'll show you my ethics only if you'll show me yours.

Pick up line number 9: Red book? Don't talk about the red book. Let's not spoil the moment.

Pick up line number 8: Hey baby, let's regulate.

Pick up line number 7: Will you wear red for me?

Pick up line number 6: What do I stand for? Well, what would you like to hear?

Pick up line number 5: If you don't like my principles, I promise I'll change.

Pick up line number 4: Honest, I'll pay you your CPP later.

Pick up line number 3: Respect you in the morning? Heck, I don't even respect you now.

Pick up line number 2: Pardon me, can I give you a grant?

And the number 1 pick up line that Liberals will use to try to seduce the voter is: Trust me, I've never taxed anyone before.

Canadian Culture
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Maud Debien Laval East, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to suggest the following exercise to see what Canadian cultural products would look like if creators focused on national unity.

La La La Human Steps would get funding if it changed the title of its latest show, "2", to read "One Canada, United and Unique".

The latest Arcand offering would be more likely to get funding under the name: "Le Canada: quel beau pays malgré ce qu'on en dit" or "Canada: It's a Wonderful Country After All".

Pierre Falardeau would get a grant if, instead of making a movie about the Patriotes, he made one about the members of the Doric Club.

The théâtre du Trident would change the title of the Cocteau play, "Les parents terribles" or "Rotten Parents", to read "Le Québec, cet enfant terrible" or "Quebec, that Brat".

"Broue" should become "Canadian Ale".

Guy Cloutier should change the name of his show, "Jeanne la pucelle" or "The Joan of Arc Musical", to "Sheila la guerrière" or "Sheila, Warrior Princess".

Fortunately, making a fool of one's self is not harmful to one's health, otherwise the federal cabinet would be in pretty bad shape.

The Budget
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Jag Bhaduria Markham—Whitchurch-Stouffville, ON

Mr. Speaker, today's budget will be another fine display of hocus-pocus and sleight of hand by the finance minister with the blessing of the Prime Minister who has done nothing to fulfil his two major promises to Canadians.

For more than three years Canadians have seen absolutely no job creation plans and the GST has not been eliminated. The Prime Minister has not delivered on these two verbal promises and Canadians will not be fooled by the smoke and mirrors budget announcements today.

I am sure that the finance minister will unveil a good news budget announcing no new tax increases. Why should he not for he has already picked the pocketbooks of Canadians with hidden taxes.

Last week's changes to the CPP was the biggest tax grab in Canadian history. The bottom line is that the average Canadian's net pay is less than it was three years ago. Let us not be fooled for it is the middle income earners that continue to pay for the financial mismanagement of governments.

Team Canada
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Nick Discepola Vaudreuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, our government still considers Montreal the cornerstone of Quebec economic activity. Many businesses in the high tech industry are located there, and their expertise makes Canada a leader internationally in these areas.

The CGI group in Montreal is the biggest Canadian owned information technology company. It was a member of Team Canada on its latest Asian trip.

While in Thailand, the CGI group, which employs over 1,700 people in Canada and abroad, signed a contract a Chomburi company to supply a management system. The contract is estimated to be worth $2 million.

The high tech sector is a jewel in the Montreal economy and, thanks to Team Canada, our know-how has spread to the far corners of the world.

Pensions
Statements By Members

February 18th, 1997 / 2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel St. Boniface, MB

Mr. Speaker, the action taken jointly by the federal government and a majority of provinces to put the Canada pension plan on a sound footing is an example of responsible leadership.

It may have been politically expedient to delay, but that would not be in the best interests of Canadians young or old. Delaying the decision would have resulted in a bigger bill down the road.

In fact, it is precisely because previous governments failed to act that we find ourselves in this situation today. It is precisely to make the plan affordable and sustainable, for generations, now and in the future, that we are acting right now.

Those who attempt to score political points by preying on people's fears should come clean with Canadians and tell them what their own plan is, and that is to dismantle the CPP. It is also irresponsible to try to make this an intergenerational battle.

Canadians believe in the CPP. They want it preserved as a public pension plan and that is what we are doing. That is political leadership.

National Unity
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Roberval
Québec

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, we thought we had seen everything with this government, but it seems more is yet to come.

Apparently, from now on, Canadian artists and creators will be able to obtain financial assistance from the Department of Foreign Affairs for tours abroad only if they promote Canadian unity. The federal government has decided to impose its political views on the creative process. This is absolutely incredible.

My question is directed to the Minister of Canadian Heritage. How can the minister, who is responsible for culture on behalf of the Canadian government, allow this government to set political criteria for the creative of work of Canadian and Quebec artists?

National Unity
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Minister for International Cooperation and Minister responsible for Francophonie

Mr. Speaker, it will be a pleasure to answer the hon. member's question. He said in his question that funding would be given only if one particular criterion was met. That is entirely inaccurate.

There is a series of objectives, as my colleague, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, mentioned yesterday. There is no need to meet all objectives, and I expect the hon. member opposite is well aware of this. There is only a list of objectives, and one of them is to present Canada as a bilingual country consisting of various cultures. Is the hon. member against our artists presenting Canadian diversity abroad? I hardly think so.

National Unity
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Roberval
Québec

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, this is the limit. The minister tells us there is in fact a rule that if you do not defend Canadian unity, you may not get your grant. Maybe you will, but it is not a sure thing. It is up to the government.

How can the minister responsible for Francophonie, who is attached to Foreign Affairs, and I am not sure in what capacity he is answering my question, how can he be so matter of fact about a program that is trying to control all Canadian artists and Quebec artists as well who are more specifically on the receiving end?

National Unity
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Minister for International Cooperation and Minister responsible for Francophonie

Mr. Speaker, this is the exact opposite of what I just told the hon. member. I made it quite clear that these were not criteria. As for the objectives I mentioned, and there are six, there is no obligation to meet all these objectives.

One of them, as the hon. member said, mentions national unity. Another one refers to diversity. Is he against diversity? And another objective for instance, is to present our culture abroad. Another objective is to talk about cultural and other exports abroad.

So there is a whole range of objectives, and I am sure that everyone can find within that range ways to convey the message of Canadian diversity abroad.

National Unity
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Roberval
Québec

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, if this were a page from Astérix, the comment would be: "Those Romans are crazy".

National Unity
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

National Unity
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Do not worry, Mr. Speaker, I will not violate the Standing Orders. You know my respect for the Standing Orders of this House.

The minister was explaining that they include this criterion but it does not have to be met. They put it in by accident, this thing about Canadian unity, but it does not really matter if we do not promote Canadian unity. What he just told us does not make sense.

I will ask him another question: Does the minister agree that the government has two objectives in mind by including this criterion, a new criterion artists will have to meet? First, they want political control over the creative arts in Canada, and second, they want to reduce substantially assistance to Quebec creators who, according to this government, are not interested enough in promoting national unity.