House of Commons Hansard #125 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was inquiry.

Topics

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Bramalea—Gore—Malton, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36 I have the honour of presenting a petition that Parliament ensure that visitors who abuse the privilege of a member of Parliament by filing a refugee claim be deported and that their accomplices face legal proceedings.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Bramalea—Gore—Malton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour of presenting a second petition pursuant to Standing Order 36, that Parliament encourage the establishment of an energy pricing review commission to keep the pricing of gasoline and other energy products in check.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, this petition concerns the national infrastructure program and is supported by the Canadian Automobile Association. The petitioners are calling on Parliament to urge the federal government to join with the provincial government to make the national highway system upgrading possible.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Erie, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have three petitions asking that the national highway system upgrading be made possible through government measures.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Erie, ON

Mr. Speaker, my second petition asks the federal government to not increase the federal excise tax on gasoline in the next budget.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Erie, ON

Mr. Speaker, my third petition opposes the addition of the term sexual orientation to the Canadian Human Rights Act.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Erie, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have two more petitions. One is that the federal government take back its power to create money without interest or debt.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Erie, ON

Mr. Speaker, my final batch of petitions requests that Parliament nullify article 21 of the Canada-U.S. tax treaty as it pertains to the taxing at source to pay credit to non-residents.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Perth—Wellington—Waterloo
Ontario

Liberal

John Richardson Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Defence and Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I ask that all questions be allowed to stand.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is that agreed?

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Excise Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

February 7th, 1997 / 12:05 p.m.

Saint-Léonard
Québec

Liberal

Alfonso Gagliano Minister of Labour and Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, an agreement could not be reached under Standing Orders 78(1) or 78(2) with respect to the report stage and the third reading stage of Bill C-70, an act to amend the Excise Tax Act, the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act, the Income Tax Act, the Debt Servicing and Reduction Account Act and related Acts.

Under the provisions of Standing Order 78(3), I give notice that a minister of the crown will propose at the next sitting a motion to allot a specific number of days or hours for the consideration and disposal of proceedings at the said stages.

The House resumed consideration of the motion.

Supply
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Edmonton Southwest was completing his question.

Supply
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Reform

Ian McClelland Edmonton Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, to refresh the memories of hon. members, this debate has to do with the events which took place in Somalia.

Specifically, I was asking the minister in response to his speech in this debate questions pertaining to ministerial responsibility, the relationship between defence command headquarters, the deputy minister, the chief of defence staff and the then minister of defence, Kim Campbell.

The terrible events of March 16 were reported to the minister by the chief of defence staff, John Anderson, and the deputy minister, Mr. Fowler, on March 18, two days later. At that time the minister of defence was not informed that there was a potential problem with criminality.

The minister of defence subsequently read that at that very time, on March 18, John Anderson had been reported in Maclean's magazine as saying that there was a suspicion of criminal intent from the beginning. That means either the chief of defence staff or the deputy minister misled or were totally incompetent in advising the minister, the civilian authority to whom they were responsible. It was not until March 31, almost two weeks later, that the minister of defence was informed of the events that took place.

That may be incompetence on the minister's part. It may be incompetence on the deputy minister's part. But there was incompetence. It was either gross incompetence or a cover-up to protect the minister.

The deputy minister, Mr. Fowler, retained the confidence of the government and was appointed to a high ranking position at the United Nations. Now either Mr. Fowler was lying or covering up, or he misled, but why would this cover-up have started in the first place and be allowed to continue? And why would a person who was involved in it enjoy the continued confidence of the government?