House of Commons Hansard #141 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was section.

Topics

Supply
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

An hon. member

Oh, oh.

Supply
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

Reform

John Duncan North Island—Powell River, BC

Mr. Speaker, we have people in this House who find this all rather disgusting. I am not certain why I am getting that kind of reaction.

Supply
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

The Speaker

The member for Vancouver Quadra can put his question right after question period. This way we can get into Statements by Members.

The Internet
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Roger Gallaway Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Internet is the system linking computers all over the world, allowing the free flow of information. Now the new chair of the CRTC, Madam Bertrand, has stated that her commission intends to regulate the Internet to ensure adequate levels of Canadian content. If information is flowing freely how and why is Madam Bertrand going to measure its Canadiana?

Rather than spend our money in such a fashion perhaps a suggestion of redirecting her cash to libraries, book publishing or literary programs would be infinitely more meaningful. Regulating the flow of information is in a historical sense an extraordinarily dangerous step. I would suggest that regulating the flow of information is in fact censorship.

As parliamentarians I suggest that we stop the CRTC's flight of fancy before it takes one further step.

Prime Minister
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Reform

Elwin Hermanson Kindersley—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister came to Saskatchewan last week on a pre-election campaign tour. Talk about a public relations nightmare. That is what happens when you send your chief spin doctor to Miami.

He had hoped to talk about jobs during a photo op. Unfortunately the stats for February came out the very same day. Unemployment is stuck at 9.7 per cent. The story was "depression level of unemployment continues for yet another month".

Then he told farmers he could not or would not do anything about the grain transportation disaster on the prairies. It was so arrogant, reminiscent of Pierre Trudeau when he gave farmers the finger and told them to sell their own wheat.

Shunning protesters who challenged him on broken promises, he then finished off the day telling school kids it was okay to gamble so long as they did not overdo it.

A goodbye and thank you to the Prime Minister for campaigning in my province. Come back soon and help us elect more Reformers in Saskatchewan.

Laval Cosmodome
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, after long months of uncertainty, a miracle has occurred: the Laval Cosmodome has been saved.

Thanks to major financial commitments by a number of partners in Laval, such as CIMA+, the Dessau group, Gendron-Lefebvre and Multimarque, Ottawa and Quebec City have agreed to be part of the Cosmodome's revival. The National Bank, another major participant in this salvage operation, has agreed to forgive a $4 million debt.

I would like to draw attention to the important role played by Alain Contant, the chairman of the Conseil de développement régional de Laval, who never stopped believing in the viability of the Cosmodome. A hard driving manager, he proved that the Cosmodome has all the elements of success. As we can see, solidarity moves mountains.

To the young and the not so young who want to find out about it, I extend a welcome to the Laval Cosmodome.

Transportation
Statements By Members

March 10th, 1997 / 2 p.m.

NDP

John Solomon Regina—Lumsden, SK

Mr. Speaker, NDP leader, Alexa McDonough, and the federal NDP caucus joins with the Saskatchewan NDP government in expressing outrage at the news that the federal Liberals are giving the railways the right to charge more for hauling grain by increasing the cost of capital formula by 1.5 per cent.

The federal Liberals have failed to defend farmers' interests again. In fact, this Liberal government sat silently as the railways let farmers' grain accumulate into an unprecedented backlog costing farmers $65 million.

The Prime Minister said last Friday that his government would not force the railways to speed up the movement of grain. Instead of holding the railways accountable for poor performance, the Liberals have the gall to reward the railways with a raise of $15 million for their bad service record.

The Liberal government is allowing the railways to boost their profits for poor service at the expense of farmers. This is yet one

more example of the federal Liberals' arrogance which will come back to haunt them in the upcoming federal election.

Negative Option Billing
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Rex Crawford Kent, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadian cable subscribers are currently being ripped off by large cable companies with negative option billing. Right now, the cable monopolies are adding new specialty channels to existing services with a big price hike. The problem is that consumers do not have a choice in the matter. This is wrong.

I would like to congratulate the hon. member for Sarnia-Lambton for getting Bill C-216 passed in the House of Commons. This bill prohibits the crime of negative option billing by cable companies and defends the rights of Canadian consumers. The great cable revolt is still going on and the citizens of Kent and across the country are sick of being cheated by the cable companies.

As this bill sits in the unelected Senate, I would hope all sides of the House strongly encourage senators to get this important bill passed. If the rights of consumers are once again compromised by the lobbying of big business, Canadians will lose their faith-

Negative Option Billing
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Hamilton Mountain.

Juno Awards
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Beth Phinney Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, the 1997 Juno awards were held last night at Copps Coliseum in Hamilton.

The 10,000 people attending the show, and the thousands who worked on the event, meant that the hotels and restaurants in Hamilton were booked solid for the weekend. The city organizers can be proud of bringing this economic boost to Hamilton.

This event provides a great showcase for the tremendous talent of Canadian singers and Canada's vibrant music industry. The organizers of the Junos are to be congratulated on producing a wonderfully entertaining program.

Many awards were handed out last night. The recipients included Celine Dion, Shania Twain, the Tragically Hip, Bryan Adams and the best new band was the Killjoys from Hamilton.

I am sure all members will join me in congratulating last night's winners and in saluting the great achievements of all Canadian artists.

Pay Equity
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, over this past weekend, members of the Public Service Alliance of Canada had an extended stay at my constituency office in Hunter River over the issue of pay equity.

As a government, we have supported and continue to support the principle of pay equity. I understand that currently the issue is before the Human Rights Tribunal and, as such, the government cannot interfere. The dispute is not on the principle of pay equity but on the methodology of calculating the amount of pay equity.

Government believes that the PSAC request is too high, especially in light of the fact that other unions have already settled. I personally believe we must settle as soon as possible but in a way that is fair to the public as well.

I would therefore urge the minister responsible for Treasury Board, as soon as the tribunal reports, to act on this in a reasonable and fair fashion as quickly as possible.

Abitibi-Consolidated
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Deshaies Abitibi, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have just learned that the new Abitibi-Consolidated, a merger of Stone Consolidated and Abitibi-Price, has decided to locate its head office in Montreal.

Abitibi-Consolidated is thus joining other companies like Avenor, Donohue, Tembec, Cascades and Kruger, which also have their head offices in Montreal. This good news means that Montreal can consolidate its role as a major player in the pulp and paper industry.

The new company, whose annual sales top $4 billion, becomes the world's top producer of newsprint; 54 per cent of its jobs will be divided among 14 plants set up in Quebec.

In addition, the presence of numerous other head offices of paper manufacturers, forestry research and training centres, and the Canadian Pulp and Paper Association, is a clear indication of Montreal's strong position in the pulp and paper sector.

We are delighted at this news and welcome Abitibi-Consolidated to Montreal.

Juno Awards
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Jim Abbott Kootenay East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Junos were awarded in a gala ceremony in Hamilton last evening. Congratulations to all those who were nominated and to the winners of this most prestigious award.

Last evening we saw the depth of the pool of Canadian talent. However, it is unfortunate that the heritage minister continues to

exhibit her lack of faith in the development of the great Canadian spirit in our artistic community.

On February 10, in a CBC radio interview, the minister stated: "Canadian artists essentially would not be where they are today if not for the policies, particularly the Canadian content rules, of this government". To which I say shame.

These performers are talented and successful because of their hard work and perseverance and determination. They are stars nationally and internationally because Canadians and people around the world recognize their talent for what it is. Canadians support these people not because of this minister's bureaucratic Canadian content rules. Canadian support these people because they are good.

Mining
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Cowling Dauphin—Swan River, MB

Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate the government and the hon. Minister of Natural Resources for releasing the government's response to the House standing committee's final report on streamlining environmental regulations for mining.

The response is an impressive demonstration that the government is making significant progress toward the reform of environmental regulations affecting mining. These reforms will improve Canada's investment climate, not only for the mineral and metal sectors but for all natural resource sectors.

Canada is an excellent place to invest. It is estimated that some 30,000 direct and indirect jobs related to mineral development may be created over the next five years. These high paying, high tech jobs will benefit every region of the country including Manitoba. The economic, environmental and social benefits that come from the mineral development managed in the context of sustainable development will contribute to the prosperity of all Canadians.

Municipality Of St. Norbert
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Reg Alcock Winnipeg South, MB

Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate the members of the St. Norbert sociocultural centre committee. They have worked tirelessly in recent years to revive this old Trappist monastery, which was the centre of community life in St. Norbert in the last century.

With support from the federal and provincial governments, these very creative people have renovated this lovely building so as to revive the social and cultural activity of the fine community of St. Norbert.