House of Commons Hansard #144 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was copyright.

Topics

Health
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Devillers Simcoe North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to address the House about the impact of the Harris government's decisions on health care and hospital closures in Ontario.

I feel obliged to dispel certain falsehoods about the issue, namely about the reduction in transfer payments to the Ontario government from 1993-94 to 1998-99, which amount to only11.4 per cent. This represents at most 2.5 per cent of Ontario's revenues.

In the light of these statistics, the Harris government cannot say logically that the cuts in transfer payments are behind the cuts to health care and the closures of hospitals like the Montfort. The real reasons for these cuts and hospital closures is no doubt the decision of the Harris government to cut taxes, including personal income tax.

Organized Crime
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Quebecois has long called for action against motorcycle gangs. The people of Quebec are now calling for help as the innocent victims of government inaction.

Only a few days after their father was hit by a stray bullet at a Quebec City restaurant, the Lagrange family has gathered more than 1,000 signatures from people calling for government action.

People are not prepared to let stray bullets threaten their own, their family's or their neighbours' life. They will not permit the law of the jungle to prevail in their neighbourhood. It is high time this

government used the resources at its disposal for the welfare of our community rather than waste them in an effort to come up with some harebrained scheme or other to create the utopian dream of national unity.

The Minister of Justice must listen to the cries for help from the people of Quebec.

Fibromyalgia
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Ted White North Vancouver, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have mentioned before in the House the lack of research funding for a disease which affects a large proportion of the population of Canada, particularly women. That disease is fibromyalgia.

On April 12 of this year the first International Fibromyalgia Conference for western Canada will begin at the Sheraton Landmark Hotel in Vancouver. This conference will bring together fibromyalgia suffers and experts from around the world to share information about the disease and how to cope with its effects.

I urge members on the health committee of the House to make themselves familiar with the disease of fibromyalgia and the impact that it has on the lives of its sufferers and their families, and to ensure that representatives of the fibromyalgia sufferers are invited to be witnesses in any future considerations of funding or bills which may have an impact upon them.

For further information about fibromyalgia or the upcoming conference members can call 604-540-0488.

Youth Internship Program
Statements By Members

March 13th, 1997 / 2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Roy Cullen Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I recently had the pleasure of attending a ceremony in my riding to congratulate 14 graduates of a youth internship program in tool and die making.

This youth internship program is funded by Human Resources Development Canada. The program is a result of a partnership of Humber College, 14 corporations, and George Webber and Associates. It provides entry level training to young people between the ages of 15 and 24. The training is given in high growth sectors and occupations in demand and involves on the job and in class training in combination with job specific and basic employability skills.

At a time when youth unemployment is unacceptably high I take this opportunity to congratulate all those who have helped create this very important bridge into the workforce for our young people. Often young people starting off in their careers get caught in the trap of not being able to find a job because they do not have the experience and of not being able to develop the experience because they cannot find a job.

I would like to offer a special recognition to Humber College for-

Youth Internship Program
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Cumberland-Colchester.

Taxation
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Dianne Brushett Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, on April 1, three provinces in Atlantic Canada will implement a harmonized sales tax which will simplify tax collection, provide a greater input tax credit for business and thereby stimulate the Atlantic economy.

The blended rate of 15 per cent will effectively reduce the tax rate by nearly four percentage points in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick and nearly five percentage points in Newfoundland.

The harmonized sales tax will finally put an end to consumers paying tax on tax. Books will be exempt from the provincial portion of the tax, as they have always been, and books for public schools, colleges and university libraries will be tax free.

A harmonized sales tax will not only benefit Atlantic Canada; it will benefit the entire country. I sincerely hope that as other Canadian provinces realize the value of a single national sales tax system they too will sign on very quickly and then we will have a tax-

Taxation
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for St. John's East.

Land Mines
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Hickey St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, this week the Minister of Foreign Affairs has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in the effort to achieve the worldwide ban on the use and production of anti-personnel land mines.

The United Nations estimates that there are approximately 100 million active land mines in 65 countries and another 100 million in storage. The tragic fact is that there are an estimated 26,000 casualties each year resulting from the use of land mines.

Minister Axworthy's leadership is truly a remarkable effort toward achieving peace.

Land Mines
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

The Speaker

The member should refrain from mentioning any of our names.

Land Mines
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Hickey St. John's East, NL

He has also asked every country in the world to show their commitment to this goal by coming to Canada in December of this year to sign a treaty that will ban the use, transfer, production and stockpiling of anti-personnel land mines.

I fully applaud the minister's efforts. I am very proud of the fact that such a remarkable initiative has been spearheaded by one of our colleagues-

Land Mines
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Laval Centre.

Status Of Women
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, ten years after its first forum on women, the Centrale de l'enseignement du Québec is organizing its second gathering, this week, under the theme: "Power, a non-traditional job".

Aware of women's limited access to the various forms of power, the participants will cover four themes: women's ability to act in their personal lives, their perception of autonomy, political power and the economy.

Despite the vitality of the women's movement, women have yet to be recognized as a social force that cannot be ignored. Thérèse Casgrain deeply believed that women's power had to be gained alongside and not in opposition to men's. So, men will be invited to attend on the final day and take part in special workshops.

Women's power to be, act and imagine is a major asset to the development of our society. Women must take their rightful place.

Member For Beaver River
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Ken Epp Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, today is a most significant anniversary for it was on this date in 1989 that the hon. member for Beaver River was first elected to the House.

She has led the way in proclaiming that MPs are elected to represent their constituents, taking their voting orders from them and not from the party hierarchy in Ottawa. She has led the way in showing that there can be politicians who serve the people and not themselves by denouncing and opting out of a self-enriching, lavish MP pension plan. She has led the way in showing that women can compete with men for nominations and can win on merit and ability instead of bearing the insult of unelected appointment.

She suffered the loneliness of being the sole Reformer here for nearly five years, supported briefly by Canada's only elected senator, Reformer Stan Waters.

We salute the member for Beaver River today. She truly is a leader among leaders, a friend among friends and a mentor who leads by example. May she continue to inspire us all. We wish her continued success and happiness.

Cycling
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Assad Gatineau—La Lièvre, QC

Mr. Speaker, Bromont has just been named the site of the eastern Canada sports cyclist national training centre.

The primary purpose of this training centre is to promote the development of optimal conditions for the training and development of top level athletes in road, track, cross country and mountain bike racing.

The corporation that managed this centre is already considering the possibility of building a velodrome, to further add to the facilities available in this region for development of this sport. It also plans to offer young people a program of sports combined with study that will help develop our next generation of athletes.

This is very good news for the Bromont region and for cycling in general. The government is pleased to be involved in this undertaking through Sport Canada.

Liberal Party Of Canada
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, our Prime Minister's recent announcement that he will, where he deems it necessary, appoint women as Liberal candidates during the next election has raised a great deal of interest.

Overall, this initiative has been well received. It should help to reduce the unjustifiable discrepancy between the number of men and the number of women running for and elected to office in Canada's general election.

The few truly negative comments we have heard come solely from opponents who are frustrated by the political audacity and courage of our leader.

Although 54 women were elected to Parliament in the 1993 election, today they still occupy only 18 per cent of the seats in the House of Commons. Our leader feels it is time to do something about this under-representation and we heartily congratulate him on his determination.