House of Commons Hansard #148 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Organized Crime
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

The Speaker

I remind members to always address their remarks through the Chair.

Organized Crime
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, all the Liberal government seems to do is review, review, review. In the meantime the lives of Canadians right across the country are in jeopardy. Canadians are living in fear.

The only way to deal with organized crime is to rip the heart out of its operation. It exists to make a profit. The government has had 3.5 years to do something about it and has failed to do so.

Canadians want safe streets and clean neighbourhoods. They will not tolerate having their lives held hostage by a few lawless people.

If the justice minister is serious about cleaning up biker gangs, will he enact legislation giving the RCMP and the prosecutors special powers to wipe out organized gangs like the Hell's Angels and the Rock Machine?

Organized Crime
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Prince Albert—Churchill River
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Gordon Kirkby Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the federal government introduces and deals with legislation through the Criminal Code. The administration of justice is the responsibility of provincial governments. It is the responsibility of municipal officials and their police departments to enforce the laws that are in effect.

Murder is a crime. Bombing is a crime. Drug trafficking is a crime. What is needed is strong enforcement at that level. The federal government, provincial governments and municipal officials need to work together to solve the problem.

This has been a problem for a considerable period of time. It is amazing that finally the Reform Party has figured out that it is a problem.

Police Services In Ports
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Kamouraska—Rivière-Du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Transport.

A rare occurrence: last Friday the Minister of Transport managed to gain unanimity, but it was against him. When he announced the federal withdrawal from police services in ports from Vancouver to Halifax, including Montreal and Quebec, there was a general hue and cry against his method of unilaterally announcing, without any impact study, that this withdrawal would take effect before next fall.

How could the minister have presented a so-called new model of port policing without reaching any agreement with the provinces concerned?

Police Services In Ports
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the ports police issue was examined in great detail by a Coopers & Lybrand study. It proposed a new model for the policing of our major ports.

To make sure the study done by Inspector Mann was confirmed we had another study done by the former chief constable of the city of Vancouver, Mr. Stewart, and the former head of the RCMP detachment for North Vancouver, Mr. Gill Yard. They came to the same essential conclusion that more effective policing could be done. More effective means more security for the Canadian public.

As the hon. member mentioned Vancouver, I have to mention that British Columbia did not take part in that study although every other affected province did. We therefore waited until a study was done by Superintendent William Neill, the former Saskatchewan RCMP head. He did a study for the province of British Columbia which came to the same conclusions.

There have been three studies by senior police officials which say we can get more security for the Canadian public by a new model that uses municipal policing, customs services, immigration and security services. That deals with criminal problems much more effectively than the existing model we are using now.

Food And Drugs Act
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, many Canadians use health foods, nutritional supplements, as a preventive measure. We have health police in Canada who are going after them. That crew over here fights cigarettes with more nicotine while attacking 60 common products like camphor and mineral oil.

Will the government admit that the Food and Drugs Act requires amendment to create a category for nutriceuticals so that these products will continue to be available for all Canadians?

Food And Drugs Act
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Liberal

Joe Volpe Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is being irresponsible by highlighting a couple of instances that hide the fact that Health Canada is being extremely responsible and diligent in the exercise of its obligation to ensure that all products that come on the market are both safe and effective for consumption, especially when there is a medicinal claim attached to them.

We cannot blame our officials for doing the job entrusted to them and demanded of them by Parliament.

Canada Post
Oral Question Period

March 20th, 1997 / 2:55 p.m.

NDP

Chris Axworthy Saskatoon—Clark's Crossing, SK

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for the minister responsible for Canada Post.

When the Canada Post mandate review report was made public last October, the minister promised that Canada Post would not be privatized as long as it continued to fulfil a public policy role. The report strongly recommended that the corporation should not be privatized.

However, in a study that the minister commissioned by TD Securities she has asked the firm to evaluate whether withdrawing from competitive operations is consistent with the objective of possibly "privatizing Canada Post".

Does the minister agree that Canada Post should remain a crown corporation, which is what she said last fall? Or, is she seriously considering privatization which is suggested in the terms of reference in the present study?

Canada Post
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Sudbury
Ontario

Liberal

Diane Marleau Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, I stand by what I said last fall. As long as Canada Post serves a public policy purpose then it should not be privatized.

Hong Kong
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Jean Augustine Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Liberal government announced that residents of Hong Kong would continue to be exempt from Canada's visitor visa requirement after the territory has been returned to Chinese control.

Could the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration inform the House why this is an important initiative for Canada?

Hong Kong
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Saint-Henri—Westmount
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, visa free access for Hong Kong people is very good news for Canada and for Hong Kong.

More than 100,000 Canadian people live in Hong Kong. More than 500,000 Canadians living in Canada have come from Hong Kong. Every year Canada has more than 200,000 visitors from Hong Kong. They come here for business, to visit family or for tourism.

After the assurances we received from the Hong Kong authorities and the Chinese government, it was very important that we were able to maintain the visa free access. That is very good news for everyone.

Tobacco Products
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have a quote from a recent Health Canada study which shows that the nicotine content of tobacco used in Canadian cigarettes has increased 53 per cent in the last 27 years.

This government has invested $2 million in increasing the nicotine content of tobacco to make it more addictive in its Delhi plants in Ontario. I ask the Prime Minister, for the sake of all Canadians and in particular for the health of our youth, will he stop using taxpayers' money to fund research into increasing the addictive potential of cigarettes?

Tobacco Products
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Beauséjour
New Brunswick

Liberal

Fernand Robichaud Secretary of State (Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, the premise of that question is completely false. For many days in the wording of their questions Reform members have tried to suggest that Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada was doing research to enhance nicotine content. We have denied that in the answers we have given in this House. Again today they are wrong. There is no such research being done by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to enhance nicotine levels.

Business Of The House
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the Deputy Leader of the Government to tell us what will be on the legislative agenda when we return from the Easter recess?

Business Of The House
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Saint-Léonard
Québec

Liberal

Alfonso Gagliano Minister of Labour and Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, since this is the first time my hon. colleague has made the standard Thursday enquiry as House leader for the Bloc Quebecois, may I take this opportunity to congratulate her on her new duties.

Tomorrow will be the last day of debate on the budget.

When the House resumes after Easter, as soon as is procedurally possible it will be asked to deal with the three or four bills emanating from the budget.

In addition it would be helpful if I reiterate for the House the other items that will be given high priority: Bill C-82, the financial institutions legislation; Bill C-44, the courts; Bill C-32, the copyright amendment; Bill C-17, Bill C-27 and Bill C-46 which amend the Criminal Code; Bill C-5 representing bankruptcy; Bill C-65, the environment bill; Bill C-79; Bill C-55, the high risk offenders legislation; Bill C-66, the Canada Labour Code amendment; Bill C-38, the farm debt bill; Bills C-39 and C-40 which relate to flooding agreements; Bill C-49, the administrative tribunals bill; Bill C-67, the competition legislation; Bill C-72, the Canadian Wheat Board Act amendments; Bill C-81 respecting the Canada-Chile free trade agreement; Bill C-84 respecting citizenship; Bill C-86 respecting transportation acts; and Bill C-89 regarding powers of customs officers.

There is a lot of work to be done when we come back. I wish everybody a happy Easter so that we can come back in health to work hard.