House of Commons Hansard #157 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was water.

Topics

Minister Of Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, it is ironic. I thought that in light of the fact that the member and his colleagues have not hestitated from associating themselves with any reception he might have hung his head in shame.

He made a reference yesterday to so-called MP junkets. I took the time to do a bit of research. The member who decried that we had approximately 20 young wheelchair athletes aged 14 and 15 at this reception is the same member who took a trip to Cambridge, England, Oslo, Norway, Tromso, Norway, Stockholm, Sweden, Copenhagen, Denmark.

I checked today on the business class ticket price, which is $5,000.

Housing
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the minister of aboriginal affairs and has to do with concerns expressed in northern Manitoba, particularly in the riding of Churchill, with respect to funding that was promised for housing. The minister knows this is a concern.

Could he tell the House and the people of northern Manitoba, particularly in the aboriginal communities, when that promised money will be forthcoming? Will there be an announcement in the next little while regarding how this funding will be forthcoming and how it will be received?

Housing
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Sault Ste. Marie
Ontario

Liberal

Ron Irwin Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his interest in aboriginal peoples which has been consistent.

I do not have the exact details because it is based on formula, but I will get them after question period and give them to the hon. member.

Immigration
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Liberal

Stan Dromisky Thunder Bay—Atikokan, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to direct my question to the hon. Minister of Citizenship and Immigration.

The minister today tabled a 1996 annual report to Parliament on ministerial permits. Could the minister inform the House on how these numbers compare to those of previous years? What assurance could the minister give Canadians that these permits are being used responsibly?

Immigration
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Saint-Henri—Westmount
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, last year we issued fewer ministerial permits than the year before, fewer than ever before. There was a 27 per cent reduction.

We are achieving the goal of controlling the immigration program more efficiently. Ministerial permits allow people who would otherwise not be admissible to Canada to come in under specific circumstances or for specific reasons. Each case is looked at very seriously.

The safety and security of Canadians remain the priority in the final decision.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Reform

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of personal privilege. During question period the Deputy Prime Minister showed very poor taste in her comments.

If she were to check further she would find that the trip she mentioned was not paid for by the Canadian taxpayers in any way.

I could provide the House with that evidence at a later date.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3 p.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 25 petitions.

Dene And Metis Land Claim
Routine Proceedings

April 16th, 1997 / 3:05 p.m.

Pierrefonds—Dollard
Québec

Liberal

Bernard Patry Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Madam Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, copies of the 1994 and 1995-96 annual reports of the implementation committee on the Shatu Dene and Metis comprehensive land claim agreement.

Gwitch'In Land Claim Agreement
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Pierrefonds—Dollard
Québec

Liberal

Bernard Patry Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, under the provisions of Standing Order 32(2) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, copies of the 1994-95 and 1995-96 annual reports of the implementation committee on the Gwitch'in comprehensive land claim agreement.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Hickey St. John's East, NL

Madam Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the eighth report of the Standing Committee on Health.

Pursuant to the order of reference dated November 5, 1996, the committee has adopted Bill C-47, an act respecting human reproductive technologies and commercial transactions relating to human reproduction, and amendments.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Prince Edward—Hastings, ON

Madam Speaker, I have the honour to present the fifth report of the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-food which deals with Bill C-72, the Canadian Wheat Board Act.

I am proud to report the bill with several amendments.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, I have the honour to present the 63rd report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs regarding its order of reference from the House of Commons on Thursday, February 20, 1997, in relation to the main estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1998 with regard to vote 5 under Parliament, House of Commons. The committee reports the same.

Privacy Act
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Brenda Chamberlain Guelph—Wellington, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-405, an act to amend the Privacy Act.

Madam Speaker, I am pleased to introduce this bill which seeks to amend the Privacy Act to allow parents and legal guardians the right to contact the RCMP for disclosure of whether or not an individual in trust or authority has been convicted of a previous offence, including sexual interference and incest.

The legislation is introduced following a tragic situation in my riding of Guelph-Wellington where a child was molested by an individual who had a previous conviction. The child's mother was unable to obtain any information regarding the individual. Parents must have access to prior records to ensure that this kind of situation cannot happen again.

The legislation is about access that will give our children much needed protection. Society must do all it can to prevent incidents of child abuse. I hope that my private member's bill will be another important step in the protection of our children.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Reform

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Madam Speaker, I beg the indulgence of the House. I have quite a few petitions which I have grouped into several categories.

I am overwhelmed by the show of public support for my parental rights Motion No. 300. In just a few months I have received 41 petitions with 940 signatures which I am pleased to present to the House today.

The petitioners draw attention to their concerns that the government has used the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child to create legislation, programs and bureaucracy which undermine the fundamental rights and freedoms of parents.

These concerned Canadians request that Parliament support Motion No. 300 which would add parental rights and responsibilities to section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Reform

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Madam Speaker, the next group of petitions I am pleased to rise today to present are signed by concerned citizens across Canada.

They oppose the inclusion of the phrase sexual orientation in the Canadian Human Rights Act. These Canadians believe that freedom from discrimination is already protected in the human rights act without this amendment.