House of Commons Hansard #162 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Pages
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

I am going to ask the pages to come out and stand around me.

Pages
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Pages
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

I do not have any more information than members do, but I am just being precautionary. Should this be our last Wednesday together, I want to publicly in front of all members and all Canadians say thank you to our pages for this last year 1996-97. As you know, the pages were chosen from some 500 applicants and they are, in my view, and I know in the view of all of you, among the finest young people we have in our nation.

Dear Pages, on behalf of all my colleagues and all Canadians, I thank you for the fine work that you have done for us here in the House of Commons.

I want you to know as you go on in your careers in life that we hold you to our hearts and that you will always be part of our parliamentary family. I do thank you in the name of all parliamentarians here today.

Pages
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Point Of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, either we will no longer have pages here next week, or you just announced the date of the next election.

On March 20, in reply to a question from the leader of the official opposition concerning the $4.8 million secretly paid by the federal government to Option Canada, the Minister of Canadian Heritage made comments which do not accurately reflect the reality. She said, and I quote:

Mr. Speaker, the member is certainly aware of the fact that the Government of Quebec-and I have in my hand a copy of the October 11 order in council-gave a total of $4.8 million to the Conseil de la souveraineté du Québec headed by Yves Duhaime, the great friend of the new leader of the official opposition.

This statement aroused our interest, and I have here the October 11 order in council to which the minister referred. If I can get the unanimous consent of the House, I will very pleased to table this document. The order in council reads: "Whereas the government, through the August 16 order in council, has already authorized the payment of $2 million to the Conseil de la souveraineté, and whereas it is in order to pay an additional amount of $1.8 million"-and a bit, but I believe this is the right amount-"therefore it is ordered, on the recommendation of-, to pay $1.8 million".

What confused the minister is the "whereas" providing that, in order to grant a subsidy of more than $1 million, the government's prior approval is required. The minister added $2 million, plus $1.8 million, plus $1 million, for a total of $4.8 million, when in fact-

Point Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

In my opinion, this is not a point of order, but I thank the hon. member for the information provided.

Is there unanimous consent to have the document tabled?

Point Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Point Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member may therefore table the document.

Canadian Security Intelligence Service
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Vaudreuil
Québec

Liberal

Nick Discepola Parliamentary Secretary to Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table two copies, one in each official language, of the 1996 public report of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service.

I ask that it be referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Legal Affairs.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

April 23rd, 1997 / 3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Shaughnessy Cohen Windsor—St. Clair, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 12th report of the Standing Committee on Justice and Legal Affairs.

This is an interim report on the issue of a victims bill of rights. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), your committee has considered the subject matter of Motion No. 168, a victims bill of rights, and has agreed to report it with recommendations.

In doing so, we ask for a response as soon as possible from the Government of Canada with respect to this important matter.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 61 petitions.

Centennial Flame Research Report
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Sheila Finestone Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to section 7 of the Centennial Flame Research Award Act, I have the privilege of tabling the report of the Standing Committee on Human Rights and Status of Disabled Persons in both official languages for the 1994-1995 centennial flame research report.

I bring to members' attention the Crane story which will be tabled with the report, which is a report on the first of the Braille libraries set up in Canada. I commend the reading of this marvellous story.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present the 65th report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs regarding the committee's mandate under Standing Order 108(3)(a) in relation to the provision of services and facilities to members.

I would like to thank the members of the subcommittee, particularly the member for Bellechasse who, in my view and in the view of the committee, has done an exceptionally good job in preparing the report for the committee. I thank him for his good work.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Beauport—Montmorency—Orléans, QC

Mr. Speaker, as chairman of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, I have the honour to present the ninth report of the committee.

This report deals with our review of Chapter XVII of the September 1996 report of the Auditor General of Canada, as it relates in particular to Human Resources Development Canada, the Canada Pension Plan and the CPP disability benefits program.

The report contains three recommendations, which are: first, that, as part of developing an official quality assurance program, the department establish performance indicators to help determine the extent to which program objectives were achieved. These indicators are to be included in the department's April 1998 progress report to the committee; second, that more information be shared with workers compensation boards, provincial social services and private insurance companies to increase the program's efficiency; and finally, that the department consider the possibility of intensifying its efforts with respect to rehabilitation to make the program more widely accessible.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to this report.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Sheila Finestone Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, I have the pleasure of presenting for the information of the House, in both official languages, the report on privacy entitled "Where do

we draw the line?" It is the third report of the Standing Committee on Human Rights and the Status of Persons with Disabilities.

We all know that privacy is understood to be the right to be left alone in our society, but in the technical age in which we now live there have been many changes. This report brings to our attention issues about which we should all know.

In accordance with the committee's permanent mandate under Standing Order 108(3), your committee has agreed to conduct a study on privacy rights and new technologies, report its findings with recommendations and, in accordance with Standing Order 109, the committee requests a government response if and when this government returns to work.