House of Commons Hansard #3 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was quebec.

Topics

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, we are very concerned about the situation the member describes and I would appreciate it if he listened to the reply, because it is important that he tell his constituents and all those living in his riding what to do.

We have set up a transitional job creation fund. We do not believe in passive income support. Our preference now is for active job creation measures, which we have transferred to the Government of Quebec. We are talking about $800 million in active job creation measures and a $95 million transitional job creation fund for Quebec alone, precisely so that people can have real work and not rely on passive income support. That is what our workers want.

Immigration
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Liberal

Carmen Provenzano Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

A new American law requiring Canadians crossing into the United States to undergo a lengthy and invasive inspection process could have disastrous effects on Sault Ste. Marie tourism and the normal flow of business between our city and its American neighbours.

What steps is the federal government taking to ensure Canadians will continue to have easy access to the United States?

Immigration
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Vancouver Quadra
B.C.

Liberal

Ted McWhinney Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the new measures announced by the United States are extremely damaging to Canadian and to American business. They are counter to the initiatives taken by the President of the United States and the Prime Minister to dismantle controls at borders and to promote the free circulation of people and of goods. They are probably counter to NAFTA.

Our objective is to secure the removal of those controls from application at the Canada-U.S. border. We are encouraged already in our efforts by the amendments introduced by a member of the United States Senate and a member of the United States Congress to this effect.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Reform

John Duncan Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government has made a mess of the Pacific salmon dispute. We have seen four years of mismanagement on this file.

The fisheries minister is from British Columbia. Why was the minister sport fishing in Newfoundland at a time when he should have been dealing with the height of the crisis in British Columbia?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member's assertion is incorrect.

The issue, however, of the salmon treaty is an important one. I am disappointed the fisheries critic of the official opposition would choose for his first question such a trivial, irrelevant and inaccurate comment as the one he has made.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Reform

John Duncan Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, the throne speech contains not one word about resolving the Pacific salmon dispute. The government continues to show a lack of commitment to British Columbia.

Will the minister make resolving the treaty by January 31 the number one priority of his department?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, we are again hearing questioning by Reform members who obviously have not read the throne speech or listened to it.

The fact is that in the throne speech there is a clear commitment to continue to deal with the issue of foreign overfishing.

If the fisheries critic of the official opposition knew something about the problem of the Pacific salmon treaty, he would know that it began because the Alaskans overfished Canadian bound sockeye salmon in northern British Columbia going to the Nass and Skeena Rivers, to the tune of three times what they had done previously under the treaty.

That is what he has not understood and he has not understood that the throne speech addresses it directly.

Standing Orders
Routine Proceedings

September 24th, 1997 / 3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

I have the honour to lay upon the table a reprinted copy of the Standing Orders of the House of Commons dated June 1997.

Chief Electoral Officer Of Canada
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

I have the honour to lay upon the table the 1997 report by the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada on the 36th general election.

This report is deemed to have been permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Reform

Jim Gouk West Kootenay—Okanagan, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present three petitions on the same subject that vary a bit.

Each of them calls on the government to reject proposed changes to the Canada Health and Drug Act that would prevent people from taking dietary supplements or herbal goods of their own choice.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Finlay Oxford, ON

Mr. Speaker, my congratulations on your re-election, Sir.

I have two petitions to present today. The first petition is signed by 30 of my constituents and calls upon Parliament to urge the federal government to join with the provincial governments in making the national highway system upgrading possible beginning in 1997.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

John Finlay Oxford, ON

Mr. Speaker, the second petition is signed by 57 of my constituents.

It calls upon Parliament to enact legislation to amend the Criminal Code, specifically sections 173 and 174, the indecent act and public nudity provisions, to clearly state that a woman exposing her breasts in a public place is an indecent act.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Alex Shepherd Durham, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure today to present a petition on behalf of 57 constituents who live in a co-op housing project on 610 Beatrice Street in my riding.

In part they indicate that the Government of Canada and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation have begun secret negotiations with the province of Ontario, that the people who own and operate co-operatives have been excluded from these negotiations, and that the Government of Ontario has already breached its own agreements with provincially funded housing co-operatives.

They pray that the minister responsible for Canada Mortgage and Housing will immediately suspend negotiations on social housing with the province of Ontario and resume negotiations only if the minister proceeds under publicly declared principles established with the input of the co-operative housing stakeholders.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Liberal

Peter Adams Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I ask that all questions be allowed to stand.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

Is that agreed?