House of Commons Hansard #87 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was plan.

Topics

Acquisition Of Submarines
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, as I indicated in the House yesterday, this matter is still under discussion with the British government and until that matter is finalized we are not in a position to announce a decision one way or the other.

Hepatitis C
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Reform

Jim Hart Okanagan—Coquihalla, BC

Mr. Speaker, what is so disappointing here is that the health minister seems to not care. He just goes back on his own words.

In November he told the Ottawa Citizen that he did not want to see hepatitis C victims spend their lifetime in litigation.

A few weeks ago he said all victims would receive “compassionate and fair and appropriate compensation”. The minister broke those promises, and all the empty sound bites in the world will not change that.

Just when did he sell out on his principles and was it worth it?

Hepatitis C
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, all the health ministers in the country took those same principles to heart as they worked for months toward this compensation package.

As a result of our work and the agreement among all governments over 22,000 Canadians have been spared litigation. Over 22,000 Canadians are going to be the beneficiaries of a compensation offer that totals $1.1 billion.

For them and their families that is very significant evidence of compassion on the part of governments.

Hepatitis C
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Reform

Jim Hart Okanagan—Coquihalla, BC

Mr. Speaker, I asked the minister if he was proud of the fact that he abandoned those people who now will spend their lifetime in litigation, the people who are not being compensated in his package. His package is wrong. He knows it. Other ministers of health in the provinces now know that too.

Is he now saying that he does not care about those excluded hepatitis C victims? Is he saying that he does not care if they spend their lifetime in litigation?

Hepatitis C
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, as I have explained, all the governments of Canada brought those same principles of compassion and fairness to the table. We looked at the history of the matter. We proceeded on what we believe is sound public policy.

For example, in the Vancouver Sun this week some of these points are made very elaborately confirming the wisdom of the decision of all the health ministers and all the governments of the country supporting it and saying the position is fully justified. Across the country evidence can be seen of people who have thought about this issue agreeing with the position taken by all the governments of the country.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Bloc

René Canuel Matapédia—Matane, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans.

The Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans harshly criticized the federal government's management of the entire industry. In the meantime, the people in the fishing industry are very anxious and concerned.

I ask the minister to tell us when and more importantly how he plans to decide what is surplus in the fishing industry.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his question. I have made a series of decisions and statements. Some aspect of almost every one of my announcements concerns fishing and the need to conserve stocks.

I assure him that I will reply in detail to the recommendations of the committee, and he will see what I want to do about each recommendation.

Peacekeeping
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of National Defence.

As part of a new United Nations peacekeeping mission in order to contribute to the stability of central Africa, the Government of Canada has just announced that it will deploy Canadian troops in support of this operation.

Will the minister advise this House as to the nature of the Canadian forces contribution to this UN mandated mission?

Peacekeeping
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, Canada has again been asked to participate in peacekeeping by the United Nations. The United Nations pays great tribute to this country's involvement in peacekeeping by asking us to do so. This is a great tribute to our forces.

Our forces will be providing some 45 personnel, 25 of whom will be signals personnel who will be able to manage the communication system on this mission. They will be part of a 1,350 troop mission to help bring peace and security into the central African republic.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Reform

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, the family of Connie and Ty Jacobs broke their silence about the tragic shooting two weeks ago on the Tsuu T'ina reserve. Yesterday they went public asking for help. Connie's sister, Cynthia Applegarth, said “As long as there is poverty on reserves and no economic development you will have deaths, suicides and murders”. She wants an independent inquiry into the social, economic and democratic conditions on the Tsuu T'ina reserve.

Why will the Indian affairs minister not listen to Connie's grieving family?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, these questions have been asked repeatedly this week. The hon. member should listen to the answer from the government in spite of the heckling from the Leader of the Opposition who is so undisciplined this morning.

I want to tell the hon. member that the government has taken this issue and issues involving aboriginal Canadians very seriously. He knows of the RCMP investigation. He knows of course of the province's inquiry. He knows that the council of elders can advise the inquiry and he knows that it is led—

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Wild Rose.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Reform

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, the government is ignoring the people. It is not the inquiry we are talking about. We are talking about the conditions on the reserve.

Connie Jacobs probably did not donate a lot of money to the Liberal Party, nor golf with the Prime Minister, nor fly with him across the country on trade missions. I do not think she ran in the federal Liberal election.

Chief Roy Whitney does not want an investigation. He is the close friend. He does not want an investigation into the economic, social and democratic conditions on his reserve. Of course not.

Why is the minister listening to Chief Whitney instead of Connie Jacobs' family?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I am a little disappointed in the hon. member taking an unfortunate incident such as this and linking it to such things as political contributions or otherwise. The misfortunes of other people should not be abused by the hon. member across. He knows this as well.

We have been doing a lot of work with respect to the conditions of the aboriginal communities in Canada. The hon. minister today is meeting with aboriginal communities and continues to do excellent work in trying to promote the well-being of aboriginal Canadians.

All the Reform Party wants to do is cut $1 billion for aboriginal Canadians.

Hepatitis C
Oral Question Period

April 3rd, 1998 / 11:45 a.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Health is wrong about the health ministers conference call on Monday. It is our clear indication that this meeting has been established to talk strictly about whether or not all the provinces are still on the same page with respect to the serious issue of compensation. It is clearly a concern that is growing as more information is made available showing that this unjust compensation package is based on false information.

Is the Minister of Health now prepared to go back to the drawing board, re-open discussions with the provinces and come up with a fair and humane compensation package?