House of Commons Hansard #3 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was speech.

Topics

Income Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The chair is of the opinion that this bill is at the same stage as was Bill C-502 at the time the first session of the 36th Parliament was prorogued. Consequently, pursuant to Standing Order 86(1), the order for second reading of this bill will be placed at the bottom of the order of precedence in the Order Paper and it will be designated as a votable item.

Access To Information Act
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Liberal

John Bryden Wentworth—Burlington, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-206, an act to amend the Access to Information Act and to make amendments to other acts.

Mr. Speaker, this bill is in the same form as it was before prorogation. What it does is substantially reforms the Access to Information Act.

Although it is only at first reading, I draw the attention of members to the fact that it is in the same form because I believe it is one of the first bills to obtain more than 100 seconders under the changes to the standing orders.

I have 112 seconders to this bill, mainly from the Liberals, the Reform and the Bloc Quebecois.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Reform

Maurice Vellacott Wanuskewin, SK

, seconded by the hon. member for Huron—Bruce, moved for leave to introduce Bill C-207, an act to amend the Criminal Code to prohibit coercion in medical procedures that offend a person's religion or belief that human life is inviolable.

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to introduce the former Bill C-461, an act to amend the Criminal Code to prohibit coercion in medical procedures that offend a person's religion or belief that human life is inviolable. The seconder for the bill is the hon. member for Huron—Bruce.

The purpose of the bill is to ensure that health providers working in medical facilities of various kinds will never be forced to participate against their wills in procedures such as abortions or acts of euthanasia. The bill itself does not ban abortion or euthanasia, but it makes it illegal to force another person to participate in an abortion procedure or an act of euthanasia.

Incredibly there are medical personnel in Canada who have been fired because the law is not explicit enough in spelling out their conscience rights. The bill will make those rights explicit.

This bill is in the identical wording as before prorogation and received some 100 signatures and significant support from all parties. It is a labour issue and it is also a conscience rights issue.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Crown Liability And Proceedings Act
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-208, an act to to amend the Crown Liability and Proceedings Act.

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to reintroduce this bill.

Its purpose is to ensure that a person serving time in prison will not be able to sue the federal government or its employees under any federal legislation in respect of a claim arising while the person is under sentence.

If enacted, the bill would put an end to the practice of prisoners engaging in frivolous lawsuits against the federal government and their abuse of the legal system.

I urge all members in the House to give serious consideration to the bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:20 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill 209, an act to amend the Criminal Code (prohibited sexual acts).

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to reintroduce my private member's bill. This bill seeks to raise the legal age of sexual consent from age 14 to age 16. It would thus make it a criminal offence for an adult to engage in sex with children under the age of 16.

The bill was first introduced in 1996 and reintroduced in 1997. However, the growing concern over child pornography and child prostitution in the country makes it even more urgent for the enactment of this legislation to protect the young and vulnerable in our society from predators among us.

For the sake of our children I appeal to members of the House to give serious consideration to the bill and lend their support accordingly.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Bank Of Canada Act
Routine Proceedings

10:20 a.m.

Bloc

Richard Marceau Charlesbourg, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-210, an act to amend the Bank of Canada Act (withdrawal of the thousand dollar note).

Mr. Speaker, on the day following the victory of the Bloc Quebecois hockey team against the Parliament Hill media people's team, I am very pleased to introduce a bill that seeks to have the $1,000 note withdrawn. This bill is supported by police forces in Canada.

Withdrawing the $1,000 note will allow us to lead a more effective fight against money launderers, something most Quebecers and Canadians support.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Income Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

10:20 a.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Kamouraska—Rivière-Du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-211, an act to amend the Income Tax Act (travel expenses for a motor vehicle used by a forestry worker).

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to introduce this bill for the first time. This legislation seeks to amend the Income Tax Act to allow a reasonable tax deduction for forestry workers who work far from their place of residence, so that the Income Tax Act is an incentive to work and not the reverse.

This bill is in response to a request made by several forestry workers in my riding and in my region. These people deserve to be encouraged. When a person agrees to travel 300, 400, 500 or 600 kilometres to make a living, it is normal that the government should grant a corresponding deduction.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Canada Labour Code
Routine Proceedings

10:20 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-212, an act to amend the Canada Labour Code, the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act, and the Public Service Staff Relations Act (prohibited provision in a collective agreement).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to introduce a bill that will prohibit the application of orphan clauses in the collective agreements mentioned in the following three statutes: the Canada Labour Code, the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act, and the Public Service Staff Relations Act.

The bill's purpose is to prohibit clauses in collective agreements that discriminate against new arrivals in the labour market and to ensure that these workers enjoy the same pay and benefits as previously hired workers.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Shipbuilding Act, 1999
Routine Proceedings

10:25 a.m.

Bloc

Antoine Dubé Lévis, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-213, an act to promote shipbuilding, 1999.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased today to introduce a bill to promote shipbuilding in Canada.

Basically, it consists of three measures: a loan guarantee program specific to shipbuilding; a leasing write-off provision; a shipbuilding tax credit similar to the one that already exists in Quebec. These three measures were proposed two years ago by the Canadian shipbuilders' association and had the support of the interunion coalition of 4,000 shipbuilding workers in Canada.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Treaties Act
Routine Proceedings

10:25 a.m.

Bloc

Daniel Turp Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-214, an act to provide for the participation of the House of Commons when treaties are concluded.

Mr. Speaker, I have the pleasure of introducing this act, which is aimed at involving the House of Commons in the negotiation and consultation relating to treaties. Its ultimate aim is to democratize the process whereby Canada concludes such treaties.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Tabling Of Treaties Act
Routine Proceedings

October 14th, 1999 / 10:25 a.m.

Bloc

Daniel Turp Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-215, an act for the tabling of treaties in the House of Commons.

Mr. Speaker, I have the pleasure of introducing this act, which is aimed at creating solid legal foundations for the procedure whereby the government tables treaties before the House of Commons, so as to inform the hon. members of this House of the existence of the treaties concluded by Canada. Canada had given up this practice but reinstated it several months ago. It does, however, require solid legal bases.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Treaty Approval Act
Routine Proceedings

10:25 a.m.

Bloc

Daniel Turp Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-216, an act to provide for the approval of treaties by the House of Commons.

Mr. Speaker, the bill relating to the approval of treaties is aimed at allowing this House to approve treaties before they are ratified by the government, thus reinstating the past practice of having House of Commons support and approval for major treaties.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Treaty Publication Act
Routine Proceedings

10:25 a.m.

Bloc

Daniel Turp Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-217, an act to provide for the publication of treaties.

Mr. Speaker, this fourth bill, which also deals with treaties, seeks to require the government to publish treaties not only in the Canada Treaty Series , but also in the Canada Gazette and on the Web site of the Department of Foreign Affairs, so as to ensure wide circulation of treaties, which are becoming increasingly important documents for Canada and the international community.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Conclusion Of Treaties Act
Routine Proceedings

10:30 a.m.

Bloc

Daniel Turp Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-218, an act to provide for consultation with provincial governments when treaties are negotiated and concluded.

Mr. Speaker, the fifth and last bill that I am tabling today seeks to put into a single piece of legislation all the issues that I would like to see included in a bill on the conclusion, publication, ratification and circulation of treaties.

I am pleased to introduce this bill and I hope that it will be passed so the signing of treaties can be made a truly democratic process by involving parliamentarians.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Business Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10:30 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

moved:

That, during the first thirty sitting days of the present Session of Parliament, whenever a Minister of the Crown, when proposing a motion for first reading of a public bill, states that the said bill is in the same form as a bill introduced by a Minister of the Crown in the previous session, if the Speaker is satisfied that the said bill is in the same form as at prorogation, notwithstanding Standing Order 71, the said bill shall be deemed in the current session to have been considered and approved at all stages completed at the time of prorogation of the previous session.

Mr. Speaker, I believe you would find unanimous consent that Motion No. 1 which you have just read under Routine Proceedings be put without debate, a division thereon deemed to have been requested and deferred until the ordinary time of adjournment this afternoon.

I would then later ask for two other motions to be put as well.