House of Commons Hansard #11 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was nisga'a.

Topics

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Kenora—Rainy River
Ontario

Liberal

Bob Nault Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, I want to relate to the member and to the House what this party has been saying for the last number of months.

The first myth is that the charter does not apply to the Nisga'a government. That is wrong.

The second myth is that the rights of Nisga'a women are unprotected. That is wrong as well.

The third myth is that the treaty provides for taxation without representation. That again is wrong.

If we are going to have a debate in the House, these members have to start from the premise of reading the treaty itself line for line.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Reform

John Cummins Delta—South Richmond, BC

Mr. Speaker, the minister proved once again that this is question period not answer period.

The Mi'kmaq treaty placed restrictions on the Mi'kmaq right to trade. The supreme court twisted that to allow for a race-based priority fishery. The Nisga'a treaty allows for a race-based priority right to fish on the west coast.

The Marshall decision has created havoc on the east coast. With 50 unresolved issues, the Nisga'a treaty will create havoc on the west coast.

Why is the government perpetuating the chaos of a flawed court decision by proposing flawed legislation?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Kenora—Rainy River
Ontario

Liberal

Bob Nault Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, let me go back to the myths of the Reform Party. One of the myths that the Reform Party is trying to perpetuate is that the treaty does not recognize federal and provincial laws. That is wrong.

Audiovisual Productions
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères, QC

Mr. Speaker, in the CINAR affair, the Minister of Canadian Heritage is accusing the Bloc Quebecois of making unfounded allegations and is carefully avoiding to answer any of our questions.

How can the minister explain that she continues to clam up whenever we ask questions, on the pretext that an investigation is being carried out, while her department officials are giving private briefing sessions to certain journalists acknowledging that there are problems at Telefilm Canada?

Audiovisual Productions
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, if the reference is to briefings for journalists, these are certainly not secret briefings.

Audiovisual Productions
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères, QC

Mr. Speaker, I repeat, department employees admit the existence of questionable practices at Telefilm Canada, while the minister is refusing to give any answers here to questions from the opposition.

Since Laurier Lapierre, chairman of the board of Telefilm Canada, appears to be implicated in this, does the minister not feel that she ought to ask Mr. LaPierre to step aside temporarily, in the name of ethics, until the matter has been clarified?

Audiovisual Productions
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, for about a week now, I think, the hon. member opposite has been making allegations against CINAR and the members of Telefilm Canada. I believe that he ought to follow the lead of his leader in Quebec City, who said that these questions required reflection and that the RCMP needed to be left alone to do what has to be done.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Reform

Dave Chatters Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, natives have now resumed logging on provincial crown land based on the Marshall decision.

Would the minister of Indian affairs please clarify for the House whether, in his opinion, the Marshall decision gives aboriginals the right to log on crown land, yes or no?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Kenora—Rainy River
Ontario

Liberal

Bob Nault Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we are now in the process of negotiating with the provincial governments and the first nations people. Because of the Marshall decision, we will define during the negotiations exactly what those aboriginal rights are.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Reform

Dave Chatters Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, that hardly constituted an answer to my question.

Section 92(a) of the Canadian constitution clearly gives provincial ownership and rights to manage natural resources. In the minister's opinion, which takes precedence: the constitutional right of the provinces, or a 239 year old numbered treaty that was struck before Canada even existed?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Kenora—Rainy River
Ontario

Liberal

Bob Nault Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, if he would read the constitution he would know that provincial governments and federal governments both have a fiduciary responsibility to first nations people.

Professional Sport
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Brien Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, if we listen to the Minister of Industry, it is clear that the Canadian government will not be coming to the assistance of professional sports clubs. But yesterday the Secretary of State for Amateur Sport opened the door to indirect assistance.

My question is for the Minister of Industry. How does the minister explain the remarks of the Secretary of State for Amateur Sport, who continues to say that the government will provide indirect assistance for professional sports clubs? Whom are we to believe, the Minister of Industry or the Secretary of State for Amateur Sport?

Professional Sport
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, National Hockey League teams are facing a problem. It is a problem on which we have spent a great deal of time. We have held talks with other levels of government. I know that all members are concerned about this problem, but we do not yet have a solution.

Ireland
Oral Question Period

October 26th, 1999 / 2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Pat O'Brien London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, during the past months a frustrating stalemate has stalled the peace process in Northern Ireland. Indeed, it threatens to destroy it and the peace process there is at a critical stage right now.

Would the Minister of Foreign Affairs tell the House what actions the Government of Canada has taken to help ensure that the peace process will ultimately be successful?

Ireland
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Winnipeg South Centre
Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the most important initiative was the visit that the Prime Minister took to Northern Ireland this last summer, where he lent his presence and the broad support of Canada behind the process. At the same time, he announced a $1 million contribution to the International Fund for Ireland which is designed to help reconciliation in that country.

In addition, we have General de Chastelain working on the decommissioning environment. We have Professor Shearing working on the Patten Commission and Professor Hoyt working on the inquiry into bloody Sunday. These are three very distinguished Canadians who are actively involved in trying to bring together the two sides in that process.

In this case, Canada is very much showing that we deeply desire peace in Northern Ireland.