House of Commons Hansard #12 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was treaty.

Topics

2 p.m.

The Speaker

As is our practice on Wednesday we will now sing O Canada.

Anthony Toldo Sr.
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Rick Limoges Windsor—St. Clair, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the House that one our community's leading citizens, Mr. Anthony Toldo Sr., is being invested with the Order of Ontario on Monday, November 1, 1999.

Mr. Toldo is a philanthropist and industrialist who has made an enormous contribution to Windsor and Tecumseh. Over the years he has made many generous donations, the most notable of which was $1 million to the Windsor Regional Cancer Centre.

Tony Toldo is an example of the Canadian dream. He arrived in Canada as a poor young boy from Italy in 1934 and through hard work and determination built a business empire that employs over 1,100 people in three countries.

Tony Toldo represents the very best of what makes Windsor, Tecumseh and Canada such great places to live. I want to extend my heartfelt congratulations to Tony Toldo on being named to the Order of Ontario, an honour that is well deserved.

West Central Pelleting
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Gerry Ritz Battlefords—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, in the great western tradition of private enterprise and finding opportunities, the West Central Pelleting company of Wilkie, Saskatchewan has built itself into a successful, value-added operation.

Five hundred shareholders, consisting of retired and active farmers, small business people and other citizens, raised $2.2 million to start this operation. The company takes in screenings. That is the plant material left over after the grain has been cleaned and processed. Though screenings have long been known to have nutritional value as animal feed, they have usually been shipped elsewhere, along with the employment opportunities.

West Central Pelleting uses nutritional consultants to provide its growing customer base with made-to-order feed products. According to Bonnie Stephenson of Grainews , “West Central has met its first year goal of 20,000 metric tonnes of production and has just completed an expansion that has tripled its storage capacity”. There are 15 employees there now and I predict a lot more jobs to come as prairie people apply their know-how and determination to succeed.

Congratulations, West Central Pelleting.

Women's History Month
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Jacques Saada Brossard—La Prairie, QC

Mr. Speaker, October is women's history month. In this Année de la Francophonie, which is particularly exciting in Quebec, I would like to pay special tribute to those women who fought for the right to vote for women in Quebec.

In 1907, Marie Gérin-Lajoie and Caroline Beïque founded the Fédération nationale Saint-Jean-Baptiste to promote women's civil and political rights. They called for a reform of the civil code at the time and demanded a commission of inquiry be set up to examine women's rights.

In 1922, still not having obtained the right to vote, Marie Gérin-Lajoie went to Quebec City with a group of women in order to lobby the premier. In the following years, Idola St-Jean and Thérèse Casgrain took over. After a number of years of vigorous efforts, women in Quebec finally obtained the right to vote on April 25, 1940.

Since then, because of the profound convictions of these activists, a number of Quebec women have been elected to the National Assembly of Quebec and to the House of Commons. Despite that, however, the men to women ratio is far from representative of Canada's total population.

Buffett Taylor Chair
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Judi Longfield Whitby—Ajax, ON

Mr. Speaker, a near fatal heart attack and a family member's personal brush with breast cancer has prompted my constituent, Mr. Ed Buffett, president and CEO of Buffett Taylor and Associates Ltd., to donate $1 million to McMaster University for a research chair in breast cancer.

The Buffett Taylor Chair in Breast Cancer Research will conduct independent research and clinical trials in breast cancer, evaluate the use of innovative methods to improve communication between physicians and women with breast cancer, and research methods to improve clinical practice guidelines to enhance the care of women who have the disease.

Buffett Taylor and Associates is a leading Canadian consulting firm that specializes in employee health benefits and worksite wellness, and Mr. Buffett, a member of McMaster's board of governors, is the chairman of the Wellness Council of Canada.

As a direct result of his action, many lives could be saved. I am proud to represent Mr. Ed Buffett, a Whitby resident, in parliament.

Air Transportation
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Guy St-Julien Abitibi, QC

Mr. Speaker, First Air, the third largest regularly scheduled air carrier in Canada and its Inuit owned parent corporation Makivik oppose the merger of Air Canada and Canadian International Airlines proposed by Onex.

The president of First Air, Bob Davis, is asking the Minister of Transport to oppose any agreement that does not guarantee specifically the interests of northern consumers and of the aviation industry in the north, the positions of First Air employees, Air Inuit and the investments of the Inuit in the compensation funds set up under the terms of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement.

According to the president of Makivik, Pita Aatami, “the federal government is legally and morally bound to protect the interests of the Inuit covered by the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, who might be affected by a reorganization of the aviation industry in Canada”.

Impaired Driving
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, two people in Quebec were killed by Sylvain Boies, who was under the influence of alcohol and driving a stolen vehicle.

We know that Mr. Boies will be eligible for parole after serving only one-third of his sentence, and also that he will serve that sentence in comfort in the leisure and recreation centres the federal government calls prisons.

It is urgent for the federal government to introduce the legislation called for by the Standing Committee on Justice to allow life imprisonment for impaired driving leading to someone's death.

National Marine Day
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Stan Dromisky Thunder Bay—Atikokan, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is my great pleasure today to welcome Canada's major marine carriers, shippers and port organizations to Ottawa to participate in the inaugural National Marine Day.

For the first time in its long history, port and marine communities across Canada are meeting in the nation's capital to speak with one strong voice.

There are few places in this great country that are not touched by the movement of products by ships. From Vancouver to Corner Brook, Ungava Bay to the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway, Canadians continue to rely on this competitive and efficient community of industries which links Canada with the global marketplace.

Through ports across this country, such as found in my own community of Thunder Bay, the marine industry is responsible for moving more than half of Canada's international cargo trade while providing direct and indirect employment to tens of thousands of Canadians.

I call upon all members and all Canadians to join with me in celebrating not only our nation's great marine past, but also its vibrant and exciting future.

The Environment
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Pierrette Venne Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to announce a Canadian first. On October 5, the city of Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville launched a textile recovery operation.

The people of Saint-Bruno can make use of a “Textilosac”, a blue transparent plastic clothing bag, for clothing, shoes, curtains and other textiles they wish to dispose of.

They can then drop their bags off at a number of designated organizations, or pick-up can be arranged by calling the Centre de récupération et de recylage du Montréal métropolitain, located in Saint-Hubert.

Use of the these textile bags reduces the amount of solid waste that has to go to landfill, because the textiles are recovered and recycled. This is a great plus for the environment, since we are told that each Quebecer produces approximately 23 kilograms of recyclable textiles yearly.

Congratulations to Robert Larue, CEO of the Centre de récupération et de recyclage du Montréal métropolitain, who set up this project.

Incontinence Awareness Month
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in this House to speak on behalf of more than 1.5 million Canadians, men and women of all ages, who suffer from incontinence. It is time to bring incontinence out of the closet.

The foundation is the only national non-profit organization defending the interests of the incontinent. It has designated November as incontinence awareness month.

Today, in anticipation of Incontinence Awareness Month, I will be tabling a petition calling on the Parliament of Canada to officially declare November as Incontinence Awareness Month.

I also invite all members of this House to take a few minutes out of their busy schedules this afternoon to visit with some of the volunteers of the Canadian Continence Foundation in Room 256S, Centre Block, and to sign their guest book.

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

October 27th, 1999 / 2:05 p.m.

Reform

Philip Mayfield Cariboo—Chilcotin, BC

Mr. Speaker, the public accounts of Canada were tabled yesterday. There we find some $200 billion—that is $200,000 million—in specific aboriginal claims that the federal government will have to deal with.

Considering that government revenues for the year are only about $147 billion, what does the government plan to do with these enormous demands on the treasury?

Last week it was $5 billion to pay for work of equal value and this week it is $200 billion for aboriginal claims.

There is not enough money in Canada for the government to pay out these demands. Where does the buck stop?

Grassroots aboriginal people have been largely excluded from the government payout loop. Why will the government not listen to aboriginal people who need the money and give them individual property rights and the money they need to take their place on an equal footing with all Canadians?

There is not enough money in Canada to pay the $200 billion. There has to be a better way that all Canadians can live with.

Canadian Neutron Facility
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Hec Clouthier Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is with a great sense of duty and purpose that I rise today to speak on behalf of the proposed Canadian neutron facility.

For the past year I have been passionately pursuing, propounding and, plainly put, just pitching the multitudinous merits of the new facility at Chalk River which would serve all Canadians.

The Canadian Neutron Facility will be a world class neutron beam laboratory. It will provide essential materials research for both industries and universities. It will also help advance our multibillion dollar CANDU reactor technology. Not only will our bright, young brilliant Canadian minds stay here to work and do research, the facility will attract scientists and researchers from around the world.

Mr. Speaker, perhaps the distinguished students we have visiting today from France will one day be working at Chalk River, in the marvellous region of Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke.

National Marine Day
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Gordon Earle Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, today is National Marine Day, a day of pride and hope for major carriers, shippers and port organizations.

Canada's marine trade touches many aspects of our development and future. Our ports move over half of Canada's international cargo trade. However, National Marine Day is a day of great shame and disgrace for a Liberal government which does not seem able to see beyond the city of Ottawa, much less to our coasts. The Liberal government could be brave and creative and it could bring us in line with advantages held by marine industries and workers in other countries.

The Liberal government could move forward with a valid national shipbuilding policy. We are a maritime nation with the skilled workers to do the job and the business would bring Canada's shipbuilding industry proudly into the new millennium. Handouts are not the issue; sound policy is.

The Liberal government could ensure that the proper links exist between CN Rail and our ports. The government could take action to recognize the importance of our major Canadian ports, including Halifax, Churchill, Vancouver and Thunder Bay. It could recognize and take action to support the importance of Halifax as a major container port.

Mirabel Airport
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, on October 21, the Government of Quebec announced that it had passed legislation to create a Montreal international trade zone development corporation at Mirabel.

In the words of Quebec's deputy premier: “This corporation will make it possible for the Government of Quebec to finally do something about the tragic mistakes made by the federal government in the Mirabel airport saga”.

The Government of Quebec's budget includes assistance for site investment, business operations, training and recruitment, and bringing in foreign specialists, as well as support for free trade operations, for a period of ten years.

Yet the federal government, which is to blame for the disastrous decision to transfer international flights, is taking its time doing anything about the renewal of Mirabel airport. The Bloc Quebecois is therefore calling on the government to announce aid measures similar to those announced by the Government of Quebec.

Convention On The Rights Of The Child
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Bernard Patry Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canada is proud to have signed the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which was adopted unanimously by the UN General Assembly in 1989.

This innovative treaty recognizes the needs of children and affirms their right to live and develop within our society.

UNICEF Week is the perfect opportunity to announce that Canada's children will have a voice in the first national vote to mark the tenth anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

On November 19, UNICEF Canada and Elections Canada invite Canadians under 18 years of age to head for the polls and cast their vote for the particular right of the ten on the ballot that in their view is the most important.

I appeal to my colleagues to renew our support for the UNICEF campaign.