House of Commons Hansard #25 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was nisga'a.

Topics

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

The Speaker

Colleagues, I ask you to please not use inflammatory terms.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Val Meredith South Surrey—White Rock—Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, I am glad it is very clear to the people of British Columbia what the Minister of aboriginal affairs thinks of them.

We also have the Deputy Prime Minister in the House today saying that a vote in the House would be given to the representatives of the people of British Columbia.

Will the Deputy Prime Minister respect those votes from the representatives of the people of British Columbia in indicating to the government that maybe they should withdraw this bill and try again?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I said that the votes would be by the representatives of the people in British Columbia and all of Canada. Why does the hon. member want division in the country, a division between people of European origin and people of first nations origin, between the people of British Columbia and people in other parts of the country?

Hon. members of the Reform Party should be ashamed of themselves for using the House of Commons to sow division rather than unity. Let us work together for unity for a change.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, the health minister has had ample time to review the Klein proposal which is clearly incompatible with the intent of the Canada Health Act. In fact, it appears that the health minister was given a heads up almost four weeks ago by the Alberta government.

The minister also knows, because he has said so himself, that the best way to ward off the threat of private for profit health care is to ensure that we have the highest quality public health care system. There is clearly a need for that kind of decisive action and urgent attention.

My question again for the minister is what will he do to ward off the destructive Alberta initiative and when will he do it?

Health
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I know the hon. member shares my conviction that Canadians support, want and are best served by a system of public health care in this country.

As I said last week, it is the conviction of this government and this minister that we should have a strong public health care system which will guide us in reviewing the Alberta proposal.

Let me also say that this is not to suggest that the status quo is acceptable because it is not. We all know that there are problems in the health care system that have to be resolved. We will examine the proposal against the principles of the public system.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, how can the minister pretend to be the defender of medicare when it is his government that is the architect of its destruction? This is the government that drastically cut transfer payments. This is the government that signed a deal with the Alberta government in 1996 to open up the doors for private health care delivery.

If the minister is really serious, he would act today by terminating that arrangement with Alberta. He would promise, with the help of his colleague the Minister of Finance, to increase transfer payments. He would take tough decisive action today. Will he do that, yes or no?

Health
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, as the member knows, just a few months ago in this very House we tabled a budget which increased the transfers to the provinces over the coming five years. It is the single largest investment the government has ever made, signalling the priority that we put on health and health care. In the case of Alberta, that will mean very significant sums this year and for the next four years. We also said on that occasion that as our balance sheet improves, we will do more and we intend to.

Funding is part of it, but also making sure that we have quality care and access to quality care is the priority.

Pesticides
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

John Herron Fundy Royal, NB

Mr. Speaker, Canada's pesticides act is essentially 30 years old.

During committee the multi-stakeholder group advising the minister indicated that draft legislation has been essentially ready for three years. In fact, the executive director of the Pest Management Regulatory Agency, Dr. Franklin stated “A new bill has been drafted. I believe the bill has been ready since 1997. The minister is actively considering the appropriate time for tabling of the amendments”.

My question is quite simple. Are we going to update a 30 year act today, tomorrow or ever?

Pesticides
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, there may have been draft legislation five years ago, but the advisory committee that is made up of environmentalists, people from the industry and consumers was only created by this minister last year.

I asked that advisory committee to look at proposed legislation to make sure that we got it right. We have to respect environmental concerns. We have to keep in mind the point of view of farmers who are competing with Americans who may have access to materials which they do not. We have to keep mind the point of view of the industry that is manufacturing products to bring to the market. All of these—

Pesticides
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Fundy—Royal.

Pesticides
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

John Herron Fundy Royal, NB

Mr. Speaker, last year the environment commissioner indicated that Canada and the Slovak Republic are the only two industrialized countries that do not measure domestic pesticide consumption. In fact, in Canada there is no requirement to produce documentation to describe the potential hazards of pesticides to the environment or human health.

Once the minister determines the appropriate time for tabling legislation, if he ever does, will this new legislation require workplace documentation under the workers safety program, WHMIS, as health, labour and environmental groups are advocating?

Pesticides
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the member can be assured that after we have concluded our discussions with all the people involved, including environmentalists and others, we will table legislation that will have as its first purpose to protect public health and to balance the interests that are involved.

Francophone Communities
Oral Question Period

November 22nd, 1999 / 2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Réginald Bélair Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Secretary of State for Western Economic Diversification and for the Francophonie.

Quite recently, Senator Jean-Maurice Simard tabled a report on the development of francophone communities as a basic responsibility of the Government of Canada. In economic matters, Mr. Simard cites the department of the secretary of state as a model of exemplary leadership. Could he explain how he achieved such results?

Francophone Communities
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel Secretary of State (Western Economic Diversification) (Francophonie)

Mr. Speaker, the formula is brilliant in its simplicity.

First, we met with community representatives and got dialogue started. Second, we jointly identified their economic development needs and, third, we gave them the tools, mechanisms and programs that would enable them to take control of their future. It is as simple as that.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Reform

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, I had the pleasure for the last year and a half to travel the country, visit many reserves, see third world conditions of squalor, and to help people with their difficulties. During that time I got to know a great number of aboriginal people.

Those same people from British Columbia are calling me today and asking why they cannot as aboriginals in British Columbia have a say on the Nisga'a agreement. I do not know what to tell them. Maybe the minister could help me. Should it be (a) Liberals are dictators and do not believe in referendums, (b) that they are just ordinary natives and they do not count, or (c) both of the above?