House of Commons Hansard #42 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was transportation.

Topics

Airports
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Bill Casey Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, that is not an answer. With all due respect, I want an answer. This is the fourth time I have asked the question. I simply want to know why the Government of Canada reneged on a signed contract with the Halifax International Airport Authority.

If the parliamentary secretary does not know, will he commit to report back to the House on why the agreement of August 27 was broken?

Airports
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Thunder Bay—Atikokan
Ontario

Liberal

Stan Dromisky Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member has clearly indicated that the government has reneged after signing a contract. I would like the full country to know, including the member, that the government never reneges on a signed contract.

Western Diversification
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

John Harvard Charleswood—Assiniboine, MB

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for the Secretary of State for Western Diversification which relates to WD's activities in Saskatchewan.

I know that his department is very active there, but could the secretary of state tell us about some of the things his office is doing in the great province of Saskatchewan?

Western Diversification
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel Secretary of State (Western Economic Diversification)(Francophonie)

Mr. Speaker, a number of examples come to mind. In the Canada infrastructure works program there was a federal share of $69 million; Synchrotron, the Canadian light source, almost $100 million; the Saskatchewan-WD partnership, $24 million; and the Moose Jaw base closure, another $4 million.

There are community futures development corporations in the rural areas. There are the women's enterprise centres. The operating and loans fund injects another $10 million. There is still a lot to do and we will do it.

Airlines
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Reform

Val Meredith South Surrey—White Rock—Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, 16,000 Canadian Airline employees are being used as bargaining chips as Air Canada negotiates with the federal government. Air Canada apparently wants an airline industry where there are no government restrictions on its operations but plenty of restrictions on the creation of any serious competition.

What steps is the minister or his associate taking to protect the interests of the Canadian travelling public and the 16,000 Canadian Airline employees whose careers are in jeopardy?

Airlines
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Thunder Bay—Atikokan
Ontario

Liberal

Stan Dromisky Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I point out to everyone present that the hon. member was a very conscientious, dedicated contributor to the policy recommendations which came out of the transportation committee.

What is going on at the present time? There are ongoing deliberations between the private concerns and the competition bureau. When the entire process is settled we will share the information not only with the hon. member but with everyone else concerned.

Millennium Scholarships
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphan Tremblay Lac-Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, my last question of this millennium is the following.

In the matter of the millennium scholarships, the federal government is in possession of the Quebec student associations' agreement with the Quebec ministry of education's proposal to ensure that they will have access to these scholarships.

Can the minister assure us that her government will give its agreement to the proposal submitted to the Foundation, as we find ourselves only 15 days from that new millennium?

Millennium Scholarships
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased at the entry point of the new millennium to talk about the millennium scholarships, to see that the Bloc has finally agreed that they are a very important piece of our partnership together, and to say that the foundation recently announced, in advance of its original timeframe, 70,000 grants to needy students across the country.

I have received on behalf of the foundation the suggestion from Mr. Legault in his proposal. I am glad to say that our officials are working to look at its details. I am very optimistic that we will be able to have an agreement with the Government of Quebec.

Housing
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Bev Desjarlais Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, a number of homeless Canadians froze last winter. Another winter is here with hundreds of thousands of Canadians without homes or in substandard or inadequate housing. It took a year for the government to announce any funding to try to avoid deaths this winter. I hope it is not too late.

If the government is to avoid yearly quick fixes, we need a national housing strategy which ensures at least a $1 billion investment for the next 10 years to provide enough housing for all Canadians.

The economic spinoffs and social benefits of this housing investment would greatly reduce the overall cost. Will the government commit to this investment?

Housing
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Whitby—Ajax
Ontario

Liberal

Judi Longfield Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, I am surprised in that $753 million is a significant investment on top of the $1.9 billion the government already spends on housing.

The member opposite would know that the situation with the homeless is multifaceted and multijurisdictional. The government is addressing the root causes and trying to alleviate homelessness. That is more than housing. That is access to appropriate care and a continuum of services. We are addressing the problem.

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, here is a whale of a tale. A coast guard ship was called off search and rescue standby, stripped of its helicopter pad to make room for a dance floor, and dispatched on a party cruise for Correctional Service Canada. The party was dubbed a special project, given its own special assignment code and cost close to $7,000 for such essentials as liquor and lobster tails.

During the cruise a fatality occurred in the waters off Newfoundland. Why were senior CSC officials tripping the light fantastic on the deck of a lifesaving vessel at the expense of taxpayers while potentially putting people's lives at risk?

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, the minister has already made it clear that all the rules and guidelines will be followed in the future and this kind of use of coast guard vessels will not happen again.

The hon. member might want to check around in his own caucus to see if any of his caucus members have ever been on one of those trips.

Food Labelling
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Murray Calder Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question may be one of the last of the century and the millennium. It is for the minister of agriculture.

I have had many inquiries in my riding about what the federal government intends to do about the labelling of food derived from biotechnology or genetically modified products. What does the minister intend to do about this issue?

Food Labelling
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, we know this is a very important issue. The Canadian consumer wants to know. The Canadian consumer has a right to know.

That is why the government, the industry, the Consumers' Association of Canada, the Canadian Council of Grocery Distributors and many other organizations are working with the Canadian Standards Council to put together a set of criteria which is meaningful, enforceable and can be used in labelling food.

That is an important step that has to be taken so that it is meaningful, credible and enforceable and supports the desires and needs of the Canadian consumer.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

December 17th, 1999 / 11:55 a.m.

Reform

Ken Epp Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, I will ask the finance minister a question. If he changes the subject to talk about something else, I will assume that he has no reasonable explanation.

In our finance committee hearings a number of presenters called the excessive EI premiums a breach of trust. The act does not permit the minister to use EI as a source of general revenue. Why does the finance minister not just take the premiums down to $2.05 as recommended by the chief actuary?