House of Commons Hansard #178 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was flag.

Topics

Bell Island Ferry
Statements By Members

February 10th, 1999 / 2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Norman E. Doyle St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, I wish to bring to the attention of this House, and to the attention of the Minister of Transport in particular, a very serious incident that occurred last week on the Bell Island ferry service in the riding of St. John's East.

The ferryboat Hamilton Sound , fully loaded with vehicles and 75 passengers, lost a ramp in heavy seas during what should have been a routine crossing. Luckily the ferry made port without any serious injury or loss of life.

The operation of the Bell Island ferry service is very much a local matter, but the safety of ships at sea is also a matter within the jurisdiction of the Minister of Transport. I call upon the minister to investigate and to act on the incident so the people of Bell Island can be assured they will have a ferry system that can operate safely under local traffic and weather conditions.

Stuart Energy Systems
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Sophia Leung Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, on February 8 the Minister of Natural Resources addressed the ninth annual Canadian Hydrogen Conference in Vancouver. On behalf of the federal Ministers of Industry and the Environment the minister announced an investment by the federal government of $5.8 million in Stuart Energy Systems, a Canadian company developing a system for improving the refuelling of hydrogen fuel-cell powered buses. The total cost of this project is estimated at $17.7 million and will create 250 jobs.

This is a superb example of federal departments working together to support Canadian companies in developing more environmentally friendly forms of energy and technology. It also helps us to meet our Kyoto commitments. Congratulations to Stuart Energy Systems for helping us move in the right direction.

Foreign Affairs
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Cliff Breitkreuz Yellowhead, AB

Mr. Speaker, let me tell a story from Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous . Picture this: A young woman jetting around the world, testing five star hotels to make sure they are ritzy enough for her uncle's first class vacations. This young woman travelled first class herself when she was lining up luxury suites for her uncle in Italy last year. She spent more than 10,000 loonies on first class airfare.

Who is this jet-setting young woman and who is her uncle with his champagne taste for the high life?

No, it is not the Sultan of Brunei. It is not Bill Gates. We are talking about young Caroline Chrétien jetting around the globe to check out fancy hotels for her uncle. He has come a long way from being the little guy from Shawinigan.

Maybe that is the real reason the Prime Minister did not go to King Hussein's funeral. Bill Clinton already booked the royal suite, so Caroline Chrétien radioed back “Don't bother coming, Uncle. Room service is better at the Chateau Whistler”.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Deborah Grey Edmonton North, AB

Mr. Speaker, about one hour ago the chief of defence staff was forced to take the blame for the Prime Minister's poor judgment regarding King Hussein's funeral. What a humiliating day for our military.

Why was the chief of defence staff forced to take the fall for our Prime Minister's mistake?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we wanted to go there. It is very clear that the Department of Foreign Affairs, the Department of National Defence and my office worked together to try to organize it so that the Prime Minister of Canada could be there. There was an advance team.

Unfortunately I could not be there. I do not want to blame anybody. Everybody did their job. I wanted to go there. I am terribly sorry that I could not be there. If there is any blame to give, I am here to take the blame.

I wanted to go there and I did not make it. I am sorry but it is a fact of life.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Deborah Grey Edmonton North, AB

Mr. Speaker, in fact the Prime Minister just said not once but twice I am sorry but and came up with an excuse. The Prime Minister is incapable of saying I am sorry, period.

On APEC, on hepatitis C and on some of these other things the Prime Minister just continues to blame anyone else but himself. Now he is blaming the Jordanians and our Canadian air forces.

I would like him to stand up in his place and simply say the words, I am sorry, period, and not I am sorry but, but, but.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, if the member had listened she would have learned that I said je suis désolé. I am sorry. I wanted to go there and I am sorry I could not go there.

I said to the ambassador I am sorry I was not there.

I am sorry, in both French and English.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Deborah Grey Edmonton North, AB

Mr. Speaker, again there is proof in Hansard forevermore: “I am sorry but it was someone else's fault other than mine”—

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Deborah Grey Edmonton North, AB

That is definitely true. It is not good enough.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Deborah Grey Edmonton North, AB

Mr. Speaker, I am sorry but the Prime Minister could go and he knows it.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. I ask the hon. member to go to her question, please.