House of Commons Hansard #201 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was young.

Topics

Building Contracts
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Fraser Valley.

Building Contracts
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Reform

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, I wonder if the Prime Minister would even recognize himself in the 1993 videotapes of his campaign promises.

He used to talk about the end of patronage and the ethics counsellor. Now we find out that the ethics code is secret. We cannot even see it. The documents we are supposed to have access to have been so whited out they are of no use to anyone.

We are told now to follow proper procedures by the Deputy Prime Minister and those procedures do not give us the documents, the memos or what it was about, the conflict of interest from that business associate.

Why does the government not table the documents, all the correspondence today, so that we can all see what the Prime Minister's involvement was with these business associates of his?

Building Contracts
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, speaking of videotapes, we remember the Reform videotapes and the cruel, unjust attack on the Prime Minister and on French speaking politicians.

The material presented under the access to information rules followed the legislation passed by parliament. If the hon. member feels that more was whited out than should have been, he has an appeal procedure. Why does he not use it?

Young Offenders Act
Oral Question Period

March 22nd, 1999 / 2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Berthier—Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, on Friday, a coalition of people in Quebec working with young offenders stated, after a thorough review of Bill C-68, that this legislation is a decoy, in that there is no confirmation anywhere of the right of Quebec and the other provinces to apply their own model.

Will the minister admit that nothing in this bill guarantees the provinces, including Quebec, can maintain and continue their own youth justice programs?

Young Offenders Act
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, our new youth criminal justice legislation was drafted after lengthy and ongoing consultation with all the provinces and territories.

We believe the new youth criminal justice legislation provides the necessary degree of flexibility to reflect the real diversity in this country in terms of dealing with the challenging issues of youth crime and youth justice.

Young Offenders Act
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Berthier—Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, in that case, could the minister state that the Quebec justice minister legally issue a directive to crown attorneys to automatically exclude all 14 and 15 year old Quebeckers from being given adult sentences?

Young Offenders Act
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I think it is quite clear that the youth criminal justice legislation introduced in the House two weeks ago speaks for itself. I know I will have the opportunity to engage the hon. member more directly when I appear before committee.

The Economy
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Monte Solberg Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, in that corner over there we have the industry minister telling us taxes are far too high and that it hurts our standard of living. In this corner we have the finance minister saying we do not have a tax problem. In fact, the tax money is flowing very well, thank you very much.

How will we ever raise the standard of living in this country when the government cannot even agree there is a problem?

The Economy
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, there is complete agreement on the front benches and there is complete agreement in the government on this issue.

That is why in the last budget we reduced taxes and in this budget we reduced taxes, $16.5 billion over the next three years. It is also why in budgets to come we will reduce taxes, because we understand the necessity of increasing disposable income. We also understand, which the Reform Party obviously does not, that one has to pay for health care, education and all those other matters that are so important to the Canadian fabric.

The Economy
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Monte Solberg Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is interesting to hear the finance minister say he is in complete agreement with the industry minister because on the industry minister's website that speech still stands where he says that taxes are 20% higher in Canada than in the U.S., that the standard of living is falling like a stone in Canada relative to the United States.

Does the finance minister completely agree with those statements of the industry minister?

The Economy
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I made it very clear that I agree with what the industry minister has said. What I do not agree with is what the Reform Party has said, that we should take another $16 billion out of spending which would gut health care, that we should take $16 billion out of spending which would gut education, that we should eliminate equalization in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, that we should simply eliminate the middle class in this country.

That is the Reform Party's position in terms of our basic social programs and we sure as heck do not agree with that.

Bill C-54
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, the more we look at Bill C-54, the more we find it is an excuse to invade a provincial jurisdiction, namely civil law, and the more we find it is confusing and does not adequately protect the public.

When will the Minister of Industry do the responsible thing, suspend consideration of the bill and go back to the negotiating table with Quebec and the other provinces to harmonize these laws?

Bill C-54
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the confusion is on the other side, because all Canadians want private information to be protected, and that is what we will do.

This bill truly complements the only existing provincial act, that is the legislation adopted in Quebec under the former government of Daniel Johnson, which we support.

Revenue Canada
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Alex Shepherd Durham, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of National Revenue.

The PSAC rotating strikes are occurring during the tax filing season. These strikes are costing Canadian taxpayers generally and small businesses specifically millions of dollars, money needed to operate their businesses.

Can the Minister of National Revenue tell us how the disruptions will impact on Revenue Canada's ability to service Canada's small business sector?

Revenue Canada
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Vancouver South—Burnaby
B.C.

Liberal

Herb Dhaliwal Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I am very concerned about our ability to deliver service to Canadians and to small businesses.

While efforts are provided to maximize service to Canadians we continue to expect disruptions because of the ongoing PSAC strikes.

I have to report to the House that we are 1.2 million tax returns behind our normal processing. In addition, we are seeking legal action to stop the illegal activity. It also has cost Revenue Canada $10 million for this strike. Canadians want us to resolve this issue and we will. I hope Reform and the opposition will support the government.