House of Commons Hansard #212 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was information.

Topics

2 p.m.

The Speaker

As is our practice on Wednesday we will now sing O Canada, and we will be led by the hon. member for Saint John.

St. John Ambulance
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, today marks the 900th anniversary of the Order of St. John founded in the 11th century with the establishment of a hospital for Christian pilgrims in Jerusalem.

First aid became an integral part of the work of the order in England during the France-Prussian war in 1870. The humanitarian work of the British branch of the St. John Ambulance spread to Canada in 1882-83 when first aid classes were organized in Quebec City and Kingston.

We should all recognize the importance of the St. John Ambulance in providing first aid training to Canadians therefore enhancing their ability to save other lives and to improve the quality of those lives.

We thank them for their dedication and for their spirit of volunteerism. May they continue to serve us long.

St. John Ambulance
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Roy H. Bailey Souris—Moose Mountain, SK

Mr. Speaker, during the 11th century, pilgrims to the Holy Land could find treatment in a hospital run by Benedictine monks in Jerusalem. In the year 1099, the Order of St. John from which the modern St. John Ambulance grew was eventually formed.

At 900 years of age, St. John Ambulance is the oldest voluntary health and welfare organization in the world. In Canada there are now over 25,000 volunteers, including over 12,000 uniformed brigade members who donate 2 million hours each year to community service and treat approximately 20,000 casualties, all free of charge.

Over 7,000 first aid instructors teach over 800,000 Canadians annually.

Today we celebrate and congratulate the accomplishments of St. John Ambulance for its public service. On this 900th birthday, we wish it success as it goes into the new millennium.

Tong Sun Louie
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Ted McWhinney Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, Tong Sun Louie, who has died in Vancouver at the age of 102, was born in Canton and emigrated to Canada 90 years ago, establishing himself as a prominent Vancouver businessman and philanthropist and a founder of the Chinese Benevolent Association. His family includes university professors, medical practitioners, accountants and financial advisers, all leaders of the Chinese-Canadian community.

The Chinese-Canadian community in Vancouver encompasses a wide diversity in language and culture, places of origin within China, and actual years lived in Canada. Tong Sun Louie's long life reaches back to the historical origins of British Columbia, and he may certainly be considered among the early founding fathers of that province.

St. John Ambulance
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, St. John Ambulance is celebrating 900 years of community service. The white cross of the Order of St. John was first seen in the Middle Ages, and has since become a symbol of devotion and support, both in times of peace and in times of war.

Since its inception, St. John Ambulance has saved millions of lives, and an equal number have been saved as a result of its training, prevention and consciousness-raising efforts aimed at the general public.

Every year, close to 800,000 people in Canada and Quebec receive St. John Ambulance training. In other words, millions of people could some day save lives.

We have all seen this great humanitarian organization in action, as we are familiar with its trained first-aiders, therapeutic canine hospital visitors, CPR courses, and ski patrollers.

The Bloc Quebecois wishes to express its thanks to all St. John Ambulance volunteers. Their generosity and commitment merit our admiration.

St. John Ambulance
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the NDP and in the context of National Volunteer Week, I rise to pay tribute to St. John Ambulance, one of the oldest charity and volunteer organizations in the world. St. John Ambulance is celebrating its 900th anniversary, a landmark in history that is unmatched by any other charity organization.

The Order of St. John, from which St. John Ambulance grew, dates formally to the year 1099 and traces its roots to a hospital run by Benedictine monks in Jerusalem.

The NDP gives thanks for the 25,000 volunteers and youth members and for all the ways in which St. John Ambulance contributes to the well-being of communities in every part of Canada.

The first aid training, the first aid treatments offered at large public gatherings and other services provided by St. John Ambulance make Canada a safer place for Canadians to work and play. Each year over 800,000 are instructed in first aid and over 200,000 Canadians are treated.

May I also take this opportunity to personally recognize two constituents of mine, Mr. Dan Trochim, who recently received the Serving Brother Award for his St. John Ambulance work, and Mr. Bill Bihun, my father-in-law, who was a first aid man in his workplace at the CNR and who served many years as a St. John's volunteer at public events.

St. John Ambulance
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Elsie Wayne Saint John, NB

Mr. Speaker, in 1882 the St. John Ambulance Association took root in Canada. Over the years, this ever-vigilant community service group has grown to become a large family with volunteers numbering 25,000 nationwide. In 1099, the Order of St. John, an order of Benedictine monks, ran a hospital in Jerusalem caring for those in need. From this history comes our modern St. John Ambulance Association and Brigade. After nine centuries of helping others, the St. John Ambulance Association has become the oldest charitable and humanitarian organization in the world. They are committed to enabling Canadians to improve their health, safety and quality of life by providing training and community service.

On behalf of the PC Party of Canada, I would like to thank Mr. David Johnston, Chancellor of the St. John Ambulance Association of Canada, the workers and the volunteers, and I wish them all a wonderful year of celebration of 900 years of community service.

National Organ Donor Week
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, this is Organ Donation Awareness Week and tomorrow is National Organ Discussion Day. As a member of the Standing Committee on Health, I have had the opportunity to learn a great deal about organ and tissue donation in our country.

Each year in Canada, approximately 1,500 people die who could be potential donors, yet only 400 individuals actually donate. These statistics are startling.

In Kitchener Centre companies such as the Mutual Group and organizations such as the Kidney Foundation regularly work to raise awareness about donation and transplantation.

While the word is spreading about the importance of organ donation, more needs to be done. In 1996 a Mutual Group survey showed 54% of Canadians did not know if their family members wished to donate their organs.

I am pleased to be able to participate in the Kidney Foundation's Celebration of Life event tomorrow. This event will not only help raise awareness, but honour local recipients and donors.

I encourage all members of the House to participate in this meaningful week and raise awareness on this important matter.

Forum For Young Canadians
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Janko Peric Cambridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, each year the Forum for Young Canadians brings more than 500 high school students from across Canada to learn first-hand how government works.

Through presentations on the role of MPs and cabinet and simulations of an election, a cabinet committee, a question period and a federal-provincial conference, these future leaders gain a deeper insight into governance in Canada.

This year Andrew Rennie, Kathy Swan and Kneale Turner from my riding of Cambridge are taking part in this important learning experience.

I join all members in welcoming these young Canadians to our nation's capital and I wish them success as they discuss and debate our system of government.

National Organ Donor Week
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Reed Elley Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, this is National Organ Donor Awareness Week. This is a time when we remember the role organ donors play in many people's lives. In Canada today over 3,000 people are waiting for life-giving organ transplants. Canada has one of the lowest donation rates in the world. This has to change.

In most cases the saving of another life through a donation means that someone else took the time to think of others and acted in the most generous way possible. They literally gave themselves for others.

It is possible that my own daughter will be in need of a kidney transplant in the future. At that point my wife and I will be eternally thankful to the donor for they will be able to give her what we are not able to give. The gift of a kidney would be to her the gift of life.

Tomorrow I will be introducing my private member's bill, the awarding of the organ donation medal act. This bill will posthumously recognize the supreme gift that is a given to others in our society.

I would ask for the support of all members of the House in order to ensure that organ donors are suitably recognized through this bill.

Margaret Campbell
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Bill Graham Toronto Centre—Rosedale, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is with a heavy heart that I rise today in the House to pay tribute to my neighbour, friend, constituent and mentor to myself and so many Liberals in Ontario, Margaret Campbell, the first Liberal woman member of the provincial parliament in Ontario who passed away late Monday night.

In the 1960s, after having helped to pave the way for women in the legal profession, Margaret began her stellar political life as a Toronto ward councillor, subsequently being elected city-wide as a controller and going on to become a much respected city budget chief. Margaret was one of the first voices speaking to the issue of domestic violence in our society.

Margaret was invested with the Order of Canada in 1983. In 1985 she established a fund for Liberal women seeking provincial election.

In recent years, Margaret gave her time to the out of the cold program and lobbying on behalf of “her street kids”, as she called them, continuing her social work.

All Ontarians will regret the passing of Margaret, whose devotion to social justice in our community was known by all.

Tragedy In Littleton, Colorado
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Maud Debien Laval East, QC

Mr. Speaker, we were all greatly distressed to hear the news of the terrible tragedy that struck a school in Littleton, Colorado.

Two heavily armed young men took the lives of other vulnerable and defenseless young people. This unbelievable event, unprecedented in its toll of victims, leaves us with a feeling of helplessness. The most distressing thing about this tragedy is that the young killers focussed particularly on Hispanic and Black victims.

This drama is a brutal reminder that the battle for racial integration is still being fought each and every day. It shows how important it is to be constantly attuned to our youth, in order to help them not to feel hopeless about the future.

The Bloc Quebecois wishes to convey its condolences to the bereaved families and to all the people of Littleton who mourn today.

People With Disabilities
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval West, QC

Mr. Speaker, on March 26, the Government of Canada announced the signing of a bilateral agreement to promote the employment of people with disabilities. The agreement covers the conditions involved in keeping them on the labour market as well.

This is a federal government framework agreement, elements of which are negotiated with each of the provinces. These agreements, it should be noted, reflect the priorities of the provinces.

Quebec will have a good share of this program, some $195.5 million over five years, to cover half of the cost of setting up programs and services for persons with disabilities.

This is an illustration of federalism working locally and involving the federal government and its provincial partners.

Million Dollar Cop
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to pay tribute to a million dollar Canadian.

Last weekend an off-duty Vancouver city police officer was walking his dog when the dog sniffed out a duffel bag left lying beside a dumpster. The bag contained a million dollars.

Just think about it, Mr. Speaker, you are out walking your dog and find a bag with a million bucks in it. What would you do? I do not know what I would do, especially since I do not have an MP pension, but this police officer did not even hesitate. He turned the money in like the great citizen he is.

The question now is, who owns that money. As a private citizen, this officer would be the first in line for the money if no one claimed it within 60 days. However, as a police officer the rules are not so clear.

The police say they have never seen a case like this and it may have to go before the courts. In the court of public opinion I think the verdict is crystal clear: this million dollar cop should get the money just like any other Canadian.

The Environment
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Nick Discepola Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, on March 25, the Government of Canada announced it would invest $175,000 in the Multimedia Exchange Tour on Climate Change.

This tour is to show young Canadians what simple things they can do each day to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at home, at school, on the street, in their neighbourhood and in their community.

This sort of action demonstrates the Liberal government's intention to work to protect our resources and to inform future generations about protecting the environment.

I invite all Canadians to do their share to protect the vital resources of our country and planet.