House of Commons Hansard #75 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was information.

Topics

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is that agreed?

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

NDP

Lorne Nystrom Qu'Appelle, SK

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, right after the voting, my colleague, the whip of the New Democratic Party, raised a point of order about my friend from Calgary West who, when rising to vote, held up sign which had a message on it. In terms of the rules of the House of Commons, that is not really appropriate.

What the whip of our party wanted to do, was to have you rule on whether or not that was appropriate, or whether or not that vote should be counted and what the future behaviour should be in the House. If that is permitted for one member, then other members should feel free to do the same thing.

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Reform

Rob Anders Calgary West, AB

Mr. Speaker, no more loan guarantees. I opposed the bill. I wanted everyone to know why I opposed it. I am sure there are some value differences among myself and members of the New Democratic Party. If I had been holding up a sign which said soak the rich, it probably would have been something the NDP would have been okay with.

I do not think there is sufficient demand for the ships to be built. Therefore, the loan guarantees would make little economic sense. It is not my fault that there are politics when it comes to right and left, but in economics there is right and there is wrong.

Points Of Order
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The Chair regards the using of props in the House with the utmost seriousness. It has been consistent practice in the House for many years to enforce the rule that members may not use props. Occasionally, members are able to get away with it because either it is not noticed or sometimes the member uses it before the Chair can intervene, not realizing it is about to happen.

I must say to the hon. member for Calgary West, who gave what I regard as a wholly insufficient explanation of his conduct, that this problem has arisen before. When I have personally been in the chair I have had to deal with the fact that he has held up signs, in particular during the course of voting in the House.

As the hon. member and all hon. members know, points of order are generally not permitted during voting. It is for that reason that the hon. member for Acadie—Bathurst was not permitted to pursue the matter last evening. When the voting was complete, the hon. member for Calgary West had left the House, so I directed the matter to stand over.

Last night was the second time I personally warned the hon. member and I know that one of the other occupants of the chair has had this difficulty. It is not something which the Chair can lightly tolerate because if one member, as the hon. member for Regina—Qu'Appelle has said, can hold up a sign, so can other members. In my view, it is entirely inappropriate and out of place in the House. We are here to carry on a legislative function, not an advertising function. If the hon. member wishes to make his views known on a bill, he can do so by participating in debate, by making a speech or by putting a question or making a comment on another hon. member's speech. I invite him to do that if he wishes his views to be known. Or, better still, he could put it in his householder, which he is allowed to do four times a year in his constituency.

The Chair will say that if members persist in using signs during voting or some other demonstration of that kind which is inappropriate in the House, the Chair will have no reluctance in directing the clerk to strike the hon. member's name from the list of those who have voted and continue to strike it if the conduct persists and, if necessary, take further measures.

I hope that it will not be necessary to revisit this issue. In the Chair's view, it is entirely inappropriate.

Personal Information Protection And Electronic Documents Act
Government Orders

March 30th, 2000 / 10:15 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I move:

That in relation to Bill C-6, an act to support and promote electronic commerce by protecting personal information that is collected, used or disclosed in certain circumstances, by providing for the use of electronic means to communicate or record information or transactions and by amending the Canada Evidence Act, the Statutory Instruments Act and the Statute Revision Act, not more than one further sitting day shall be allotted to the stage of consideration of Senate amendments to the bill and, fifteen minutes before the expiry of the time provided for government business on the allotted day of the consideration of the said stage of the said bill, any proceedings before the House shall be interrupted, if required for the purpose of this Order, and in turn every question necessary for the disposal of the said stage of the bill shall be put forthwith and successively without further debate or amendment.

Personal Information Protection And Electronic Documents Act
Government Orders

10:20 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Personal Information Protection And Electronic Documents Act
Government Orders

10:20 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Personal Information Protection And Electronic Documents Act
Government Orders

10:20 a.m.

Some hon. members

No.

Personal Information Protection And Electronic Documents Act
Government Orders

10:20 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

All those in favour of the motion will please say yea.

Personal Information Protection And Electronic Documents Act
Government Orders

10:20 a.m.

Some hon. members

Yea.

Personal Information Protection And Electronic Documents Act
Government Orders

10:20 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

All those opposed will please say nay.

Personal Information Protection And Electronic Documents Act
Government Orders

10:20 a.m.

Some hon. members

Nay.

Personal Information Protection And Electronic Documents Act
Government Orders

10:20 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

In my opinion the nays have it.

And more than five members having risen:

Personal Information Protection And Electronic Documents Act
Government Orders

10:20 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Call in the members.

(The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)