House of Commons Hansard #100 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was services.

Topics

Co-Operative Housing Federation Of Canada
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, today 800 delegates from the Co-operative Housing Federation of Canada are meeting in Ottawa. They are discussing urgent issues, including the unthinkable but very real possibility of the economic eviction of low income co-op owners, because of CMHC's failure to provide fair and reasonable help to co-ops that are facing complete building failure due to poor construction and leaky co-op syndrome.

About 30 co-ops in B.C. alone are facing their demise because of this serious situation. While the B.C. government's home protection office has helped, so far the response from CMHC has been appalling.

Is the minister responsible for CMHC aware that officials have not even responded to urgent calls to meet with representatives from CHF to discuss this disastrous situation?

I implore the minister to urge his officials to come to the table immediately to help these co-op owners who are facing economic eviction and building failure.

International Museums' Day
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre De Savoye Portneuf, QC

Mr. Speaker, on this International Museums' Day, I wish to draw attention to the unique role our museums play in the cultural landscape of Quebec and of Canada.

Museums put the public in contact with fine arts, with technical and technological development, with folk tradition and with history. The museums of Quebec and of Canada are without rival as windows opening onto cultures and civilizations.

Museums play a key cultural role. They also play a social role, one that has been aptly described by Roland Arpin of the Musée de la civilisation du Québec. According to him, museums are mediators between art, history and science, and their visitors, and as such they contribute to the development of critical abilities, thus making their own contribution to building a democracy.

In each museum, countless people, some of them working behind the scenes, are contributing their multiple talents to the spread of knowledge, to sharing the experience—

International Museums' Day
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Haliburton—Victoria—Brock.

Tom Long
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

John O'Reilly Victoria—Haliburton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wish to inform the House of a telephone call some members are receiving. It goes something like this, “Hello, you all. I am calling you on behalf of my good buddy, Tom Long. Will you all help my good old buddy Tom to get them Canadian taxes down?”

I asked “Are you calling long distance?” He said “You all, it's a Tom Long call. Tom is one of the good guys and he will save you Canadians from your further misery. He is a really good organizer and he wants to move from the back room to the front room so he can see the porch. He wants you all to support him up there and down here. Charlton will thank you”.

Human Resources Development
Statements By Members

May 18th, 2000 / 2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Maud Debien Laval East, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday Quebecers learned to their astonishment that the federal government had created, without their knowledge, files which contain a unique, complete, permanent and virtually invisible record on each individual.

If more than four million deceased persons' records are still on file, it is very possible there are major errors in the information held on an individual by this department, which has demonstrated such total inefficiency in managing the grants it gives out.

The Bloc Quebecois is therefore inviting everyone to check the contents of his or her personal file, by filing a written application under the Access to Information Act with to Human Resources Development Canada, Attention Jean Dupont, Place du Portage, Hull.

Consecutive Sentencing
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, it has been almost one year since the House passed the bill empowering judges to impose consecutive parole ineligibility periods on multiple and serial killers. Bill C-247 was introduced by the member for Mississauga East and was supported by members of all parties, including her own.

The PC Party unequivocally reaffirmed support for the principles of consecutive sentencing and its opposition to section 745, the faint hope clause, last weekend at our policy convention. Joining us in Quebec City were Gary and Sharon Rosenfeldt, whose son Daryn was Clifford Olson's third murder victim. This reminded us of the importance of this bill; when remembering Daryn as the third victim, the current system did not count him in the sentencing calculation.

During last year's debate, Carolyn Solomon, whose son Kevin was the second of three victims murdered by a federal parolee, also told me she felt her son did not matter to the justice system.

The PC Party calls on the government to stop stalling the progress of this bill, respect the will of the House and let it proceed to the Senate justice committee to give victims further say in the debate.

Book Drive For Iqaluit School
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, in early February the principal of a school in Iqaluit, Nunavut, sent a letter to the editor of an Ottawa daily newspaper describing the urgent need of books for his school.

After speaking to him, and to my colleague from Nunavut, we launched a book drive with hopes of collecting 100 or 200 boxes. To our surprise, we ended up with more than 1,000 boxes, in excess of 25,000 books.

I would like to thank everyone in the region who contributed, particularly one young lady, Catherine French, who collected over 2,000 all by herself.

I would like to thank the people of Mattawa, the village where I was born, the people at F.J. McGellight Secondary School, St. Victor's and St. Anne's schools and the municipal library, for contributing more than 200 boxes of books.

I also wish to thank Susan Scullion of my colleague from Nunavut's office, and Suzanne Demers of my own, without whom this project could not have been the success that it was.

Export Development Corporation
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Deepak Obhrai Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, today's response by the trade minister to the review of the Export Development Act represents nothing less than a lost opportunity for the government to tackle issues of transparency, accountability, competition with the private sector and the politicization of EDC's lending practices.

As a federal crown corporation, the EDC must be prepared for a certain level of transparency and accountability to the Canadian taxpayer. The EDC must not compete directly with the private sector and must operate within the tested and recognized international environmental framework of the World Bank.

Finally, the EDC must not be used as a political tool for this government to provide jobs and financial rewards to its friends. This response reveals who is really pulling the strings of this minister and the department.

What the EDC wants the EDC gets.

This minister chose to take his marching orders from the EDC rather than the elected representatives or the Canadian taxpayer.

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Edmonton North
Alberta

Reform

Deborah Grey Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the privacy commissioner has warned us that the HRD minister is collecting detailed private information on each and every Canadian.

The minister's own security audit warns that “a formal national information technology security awareness program has not been established at HRD”.

It is bad enough that such a database exists in the first place, but why is the minister not concerned that it might fall into the wrong hands?

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, as she was doing yesterday, the hon. member is mixing apples and oranges. She speaks about an audit in my department and that had to do with general information technology systems in the Department of Human Resources Development.

In the context of what the privacy commissioner is looking at, it is a stand alone system that is highly controlled. There is limited access and the information is secure.

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Edmonton North
Alberta

Reform

Deborah Grey Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I thought HRD grants were highly secure too. Not even dead Canadians can be out of the clutches of this minister's database. Mr. Speaker, once you are on that list you cannot get off.

The privacy commissioner is worried about it and he still is, even though that came out in September. He said, “So much personal data on almost every person in Canada poses significant risks to our privacy”. The fact that so much sensitive information is in the hands of a minister who cannot even seem to balance a chequebook is downright scary.

At which point did the government decide to ignore the rights of Canadians' privacy?

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is wrong again. In fact as one of the things that we did in response to the request of the privacy commissioner, we have curtailed the amount of time for which the data is managed.

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Edmonton North
Alberta

Reform

Deborah Grey Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the privacy commissioner has been on TV the last day or two with serious concerns about this. Here is something out of the audit: “One administrator told the internal audit branch that the main method of finding out about changes to an employee's status or access rights is at the employee's going away party”.

Canadians want to know why a minister who bungled a billion of their dollars is now gathering the most private intimate details about their lives. Will we have to wait until the minister's going away party to find out?

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, I want to be very clear that the hon. member is mixing apples and oranges.

In the audit that she is making reference to it was actually identified that our security measures are satisfactory, in fact probably better than we would find in the private sector.

With regard to the issues that are the focus of the privacy commissioner's review, it is a completely separate system. It is stand alone. The access is very limited. All the information is encrypted. It is secure.

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

So, Mr. Speaker, the minister is telling us that security is great in system A but terrible in system B . I do not think so.

Canada's privacy commissioner is warning of HRDC's “extraordinarily detailed database” on everyone in Canada. The privacy commissioner states bluntly, “Canadians should be concerned”. The minister has been shown to be spectacularly unfit to safeguard our money. Why should Canadians want to trust her with the personal details of their private lives?