House of Commons Hansard #105 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was edc.

Topics

North American Security
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Quebecois proposed that any future North American security perimeter should include all NAFTA partners, Canada, the United States and Mexico.

For President Bush, North America's security includes Mexico. That is why yesterday he referred to a perimeter involving the three countries.

Does the Prime Minister agree with the Bloc Quebecois and President Bush that, for economic and social reasons, a North American security perimeter must include Mexico?

North American Security
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister already said that he intends to discuss this issue with the United States and with Mexico.

North American Security
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, negotiations to establish a security perimeter will cover a number of subjects, including immigration.

Given the Canada-Quebec agreement on this matter, will the Prime Minister make a commitment to consult with Quebec and respect its jurisdiction during the course of these negotiations?

North American Security
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, will we respect not only the jurisdiction of Quebec, but that of all the provinces. This respect is very important to us. But as the national government, the federal government, we have a responsibility to represent all of our country's interests, and we will respect this jurisdiction.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, the health minister's department prepared a report before September 11 and just now published. The report says that costs of an anthrax attack on just 100,000 Canadians would cost us over $6 billion and a botulism attack over $8 billion.

The report by Health Canada's Centre for Emergency Preparedness said that the government should spend between $50 million and $100 million to prepare reasonably. Yet the Minister of Health has allocated only about $5 million to stockpile medicines. His department says that is not nearly enough. Why has he not listened?

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the member's question is based on a report written almost three years ago. We really have to do something about getting the Alliance research bureau a quick response unit.

Since September 11, a great deal has changed. Since April 1999, a great deal more has changed. In the meantime Health Canada has opened the Centre for Emergency Preparedness and Response. We have put almost $12 million into training and to strengthening laboratories, stockpiling antibiotics and other medications, doing the very things that Ron St. John said are needed. We will continue to do the things necessary to make sure Canada is ready.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, although the report was just published, the minister has just admitted that he has had it for some time. The report, even before September 11, said that he should be spending between $50 million and $100 million to stockpile medicines for Canadians. Yet he is only spending about $5 million now, after September 11.

How can he claim that it is enough to prepare us for bioterror?

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, shortly after that report was published, we asked the principal author to become the executive director of our Centre for Emergency Preparedness and Response. We gave him the authority to put in place the things we need to make this country ready. We will continue to do exactly that.

International Exchanges
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Dan McTeague Pickering—Ajax—Uxbridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Secretary of State for Science, Research and Development is back from Germany, where he took part in the celebrations of the 30th anniversary of the signing of the Canada-Germany science and technology cooperation agreement.

Could the secretary of state tell the House how our country is benefiting from this agreement?

International Exchanges
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bellechasse—Etchemins—Montmagny—L'Islet
Québec

Liberal

Gilbert Normand Secretary of State (Science

Mr. Speaker, on October 25, in Bonn, Germany, we celebrated the 30th anniversary of technology exchanges between our two countries.

I signed a new agreement with my counterpart, the minister of science in Germany, Mrs. Bulmahn. In order to implement this agreement, the National Research Council of Canada and the national research council of Germany will provide $720,000 annually.

The exchanges will involve mostly telemedicine, optoelectronics, agriculture and biotechnologies. This is yet another example which shows that Canada can take part in international exchanges.

National Security
Oral Question Period

October 30th, 2001 / 2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jim Abbott Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government has sidelined 425 of its peace officers by not providing sidearms to the national park wardens. Those people unfortunately, who are ready, willing and able to do their jobs, are sitting on their hands.

Considering that the revenue minister has just announced that the customs officers are going to be receiving firearms, will the heritage minister make the same announcement for the national park wardens?

National Security
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of National Revenue and Secretary of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, what I said about customs officers, I would like to be more precise. I forgot to mention the “not” which is very important indeed. We are not going to give sidearms to the customs officers as far as I am concerned.

National Security
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jim Abbott Kootenay—Columbia, BC

That is just outstanding, Mr. Speaker. I cannot believe that the minister would even have the audacity to stand up and say that, when we have people at the border trying to protect us and they cannot protect themselves. That is over the top. I cannot believe this minister. What excuse does he have for not allowing them to protect themselves?

National Security
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, customs officers have been well trained. Lately customs officers have been given official powers as well as very good training. They have been provided with the additional tools to fulfill their duties. They are doing a wonderful job for our Canadian society. They all know in the field that they do not need sidearms to protect our Canadian society. That is not our vision of Canada.

Anti-Terrorism Legislation
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Berthier—Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Minister of Justice showed some openness and said she was prepared to review the definition of “terrorist activity” and to provide a control mechanism regarding access to information, two issues that the Bloc Quebecois identified as being problematic.

The minister also said that sunset clauses could apply to some clauses of the bill.

Like her colleague, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, is the Minister of Justice prepared to make a firm commitment that her bill will indeed include sunset clauses?