House of Commons Hansard #120 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-36.

Topics

Anti-terrorism Legislation
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Vic Toews Provencher, MB

Mr. Speaker, that is the arrogance that comes from a government that has invoked closure 73 times.

For years the Liberal government refused to pass legislation that would protect Canadians and our allies. Ignoring the advice of the RCMP, members over there had lunch with terrorists. Now the government refuses to listen to members of parliament.

Why is it that the government would prefer to have lunch with terrorists rather than listen to the RCMP or members of all parties in the House?

Anti-terrorism Legislation
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Lunch, Mr. Speaker? The hon. member shows out of his own mouth that he and his party are totally out to lunch on this subject and every other subject on this important topic.

We are fighting for the rights of Canadians. We are fighting to provide their security and we are succeeding in spite of the opposition and the obstruction of the hon. member. Yes, he is out to lunch.

Air Transport
Oral Question Period

November 28th, 2001 / 2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday representatives of Air Canada told the Standing Committee on Industry that multi-carrier competition in the air industry is a thing of the past. As we know, the lack of competition has contributed to the deterioration of regional air service.

Will the Minister of Transport admit that the government needs to change its approach and does he intend to allow competition to develop, primarily by supporting the creation of future regional competitors?

Air Transport
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, that is the purpose of our policy. It is very important to have airline competition in Canada.

This is why we are currently looking at amendments to the Competition Act, in order to enable the commissioner to implement a system that would encourage competition.

Air Transport
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, adding to the powers of the competition commissioner has no significance if there is a monopoly situation with no competition.

If the minister is serious about his desire for sustainable solutions for regional air transportation, will he acknowledge that he needs to revisit his decision and use the loan guarantees promised to Canada 3000 to stimulate real competition?

Air Transport
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I answered that yesterday.

It was not our intention to provide loan guarantees for new airlines. It was merely a decision made in connection with Canada 3000 and other major carriers because of the events of September 11.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the foreign affairs minister said Canada would not support intervention in Iraq until there was a United Nations resolution, but there are already resolutions requiring Iraq to allow weapons inspections. In 1998 the Prime Minister said that Canada would participate in military intervention to enforce those United Nations resolutions.

The mixed messages of the government weaken our international credibility and erode our capability to fight terrorism. Will the minister today explain the obvious contradiction between his position and that of the Prime Minister?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as I said yesterday, the point here is that the inspection right, which we call upon Iraq to respect, is authorized by security council resolution, as are the sanctions which are under way and which in fact the security council is revisiting and sharpening. They are there in order to give effect to the resolution to permit inspections. This we agree with, this we respect and this we support.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, Canadian forces are already deployed in support of actions in Afghanistan. However, there is confusion about our present role and there is great confusion about our future role.

Canadians, our allies and our military personnel deserve to know what Canada's role is going to be. Canadians want to make a substantial contribution to the war against global terrorism. Why will the government not spell out a plan for Canada's contribution instead of drifting aimlessly and embarrassing Canadians in the process?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Minister of Foreign Affairs

I am sorry, Mr. Speaker, if central command has not been clear enough in explaining things to the hon. member, but this is a war against global terrorism. Everybody from President Bush on down has explained the fact that this is different from previous engagements.

The immediate objective of rooting out the al-Qaeda network and Osama bin Laden is proceeding well. We see governance meetings being held in order to deal with the post-Taliban situation in Afghanistan.

As things evolve, I am sure the hon. member will be well informed in due time.

Air Transport
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Jocelyne Girard-Bujold Jonquière, QC

Mr. Speaker, regional air transportation is certainly no luxury. In many places in Canada it is the only means of travel available to the public. In such difficult circumstances, air transportation becomes more than mere service, it may be considered an essential service.

In this context, is the government prepared to consider air transportation a public service as in the case of bus service and require future licence holders to offer quality service in the regions?

Air Transport
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member makes a valid point about the nature of air travel in the country and that is why the government insisted, in the deal we made with Air Canada when it took over Canadian Airlines, that it provide service to small communities for a period of three years. That is something that Air Canada obviously has adhered to. That will end in December of next year.

What the hon. member seems to be saying, and I guess this is the position of the Bloc Quebecois, is that we should re-regulate the air industry. On the other hand, we have the position of the Alliance Party that wants to throw it open to U.S. competition, without any safeguards.

This is a very useful debate but it is not particularly useful at this time. We had a policy that was working. We have to adjust that policy to ensure that competition is there.

Air Transport
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Jocelyne Girard-Bujold Jonquière, QC

Mr. Speaker, could the minister draw from the example of bus travel, where busier sectors are twinned with quieter ones?

Air Transport
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member knows that I asked the Senate transport committee to look at the whole issue of bus deregulation. We hope to have that report very soon.

However, what has happened in the bus industry over the past 20 years is that ridership has declined.

One can only argue that in a deregulated environment in the air industry in the last 15 years, Canadians have had more service and cheaper fairs, and yes, we have cheaper fairs than between comparable cities in the United States as a result of deregulation. The hon. member wants us to walk back in time.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, Ken Hechtman is the Canadian reporter being held hostage and in chains in Afghanistan.

The Prime Minister said, and I quote, “We will do whatever we can to secure his release.” What exactly does that mean? What specifically is the government doing to secure Ken Hechtman's release?