House of Commons Hansard #122 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was information.

Topics

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, it is unfortunate that the opposition just wishes to condemn our RCMP and security intelligence agencies.

Let us remember the Canadian police and security agencies played an important role in ensuring the conviction of Ressam.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the RCMP and every officer in this country who has stood for them while the government cut their funding. The Canadian Alliance stands for them. We hear that the new budget will only have $600 million per year for CSIS and the RCMP.

Will the solicitor general show his power at the cabinet table and get the proper resources for CSIS and the RCMP?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I will defend the RCMP and CSIS because it is not a very big job. They are one of the most respected security and intelligence agencies in the world.

Also, it is important to note that including and since the last budget the government has put just under $2 billion into the public safety envelope. Not only do we promote but we make sure they have the financial support and the technology available and secured, so we ensure we have the safest country in the world in which to live.

Public Safety Act
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Caroline St-Hilaire Longueuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, the definition of a military security zone varies from one day to the next. After saying that these zones served to protect military materiel, the minister has acknowledged that, at the Quebec City summit, they could have included the city itself and the National Assembly. He then added that such zones could encompass Kananaskis, and, even, a nuclear plant.

Instead of getting stuck in a slough of ever more contradictory versions, will the minister acknowledge that the only solution for him is to withdraw his bill right now and do his homework first.

Public Safety Act
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, it does not change on a day to day basis. It is in writing in the bill; it can be seen. They can analyze it. They can come to the committee. They can make some suggestions, if they think it needs to be better clarified or improved in any way. The government is very open to looking at the suggestions of any members of the opposition or the public.

Public Safety Act
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Caroline St-Hilaire Longueuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, we know what the government has done with suggestions from the opposition up to now.

The minister says it is not his intention to transform an entire province into a military security zone and continues to say we are exaggerating. I remind him that the judges will be interpreting the law and not his intentions and that, moreover, the minister cannot guarantee that his intentions will not change one day.

I again ask the minister why he is not withdrawing his bill, which reeks of improvisation?

Public Safety Act
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the government put the bill forward for the safety and security of Canadians. We have no intention of withdrawing it.

We want to make sure, though, in putting these provisions forward that we properly safeguard the rights and freedoms of Canadians, while at the same time bring about better security. If the opposition or the public have some suggestions on how we can improve on that, the Prime Minister has quite clearly said that we are quite receptive to looking at those possibilities.

Public Safety Act
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Brien Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government said the same thing about Bill C-36, but did not listen to anyone. We are not naive.

The Bloc Quebecois has been saying since the beginning that, when faced with exceptional situations, we must strive to maintain a balance between freedom and security. However, the minister's bill does not meet this requirement, and the extemporaneous nature of the legislation is obvious.

Does the Minister of National Defence realize that, with his bill, he is falling into the trap of terrorists by forgetting that our best weapons to fight terrorism are democracy, human rights and freedom?

Public Safety Act
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, more exaggeration from the opposition. The bill codifies and clarifies responsibilities which fall to the Government of Canada already. The bill does not violate the charter of rights and freedoms. The government is as interested and as concerned with ensuring that we take into consideration the rights and freedoms of Canadians, together with their safety and security.

It is this government that brings about a balance. It is this government that amended Bill C-36 and listened to the various representations which were made. We are prepared to listen to representations again.

Public Safety Act
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Brien Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister said that the worst thing to do would be to undermine our values and curtail our freedom, because we would then play into the hands of the terrorists.

Does the Minister of National Defence realize that if he does not withdraw his bill, he will fall into that trap?

Public Safety Act
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, absolutely not. I agree with exactly what the Prime Minister said. That is what we have taken into consideration. All of this is subject to proper scrutiny and review. Judicial review can certainly determine whether there is any need for tightening up any of the provisions in terms of where we apply this law. However it requires that we be reasonable and be confined to dealing with that which is in fact lawful and in the jurisdiction of the Government of Canada and the Canadian forces.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

November 30th, 2001 / 11:25 a.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, there has been an interesting development. We have learned that the government is actually considering a second budget for the spring.

After two years, surely the government realizes that it is time to bring in a full budget that includes a stimulus package. Surely it knows that Canadians cannot wait for the spring.

Will the government ensure the House that there will be only one budget on December 10 to deal with both security issues and the current recession? Could the government do that?

The Budget
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Secretary of State (International Financial Institutions)

Mr. Speaker, certainly we are facing great challenges in terms of the global economic turndown and its impact on Canada. We also facing threats to our national security.

The member is quite right that these issues will be addressed in the budget which will be presented to the House at 4.00 p.m., on Monday, December 10.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I did not hear a clear answer about whether there would be one budget on December 10 or twin budgets. When will the government start reinvesting in Canadians?

Mike Harris and the Prime Minister are playing the blame game right now. It does not hide the fact that both are guilty of privatizing health care while Canadians are caught in the crossfire.

The government should stop blaming Mike Harris and make him shut up by doing its job. Will the government do that by putting money back into health care in the upcoming budget?

The Budget
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Secretary of State (International Financial Institutions)

Mr. Speaker, it is very interesting to see this epiphany. All of us will follow it with a great deal of interest in the days ahead.

Having said that, let us look back about 13 or 14 months to the historic accord that was reached by the Prime Minister with the premiers of all provinces and territories to increase health care funding by over $23 billion over five years. This shows that our confederation can work.