House of Commons Hansard #130 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present in both official languages the sixth report of the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), the committee completed a study on problems facing Newfoundland shrimpers and related activities.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Oakville, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present in both official languages the second report of the Standing Committee on Health.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), the committee has completed its study on the draft legislation on assisted human reproduction and now tables its report. Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to this report.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Preston Manning Calgary Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, I rise to add a brief opposition comment on the report just tabled.

First I want to commend to all members the process which produced this report. It was one case where the draft bill went to a committee prior to first reading. The degree of agreement that was reached as a result is worth noting.

The opposition supports many of the major recommendations of the report, particularly the ban on reproductive and therapeutic cloning, the proposals for a new regulatory body and the mechanisms to hold that body accountable to parliament.

The one major difference between ourselves and the government that is noted in the minority report is an ethical concern about any research, such as embryonic stem cell research, which results in the destruction of the embryo. We would commend to members our recommendations that there be a prohibition on such research subject to a three year moratorium and a much stronger emphasis on supporting adult stem cell research.

In conclusion I would like to remind all members that this field of assisted human reproduction involves complex issues of science, health and ethics. There are two things that this report recommends to the House in order to resolve those things: first, to establish a regulatory arena where all those interests and conflicts can be represented and adjudicated openly; and second, for the House to give direction to that body, just a simple directive that where there is a conflict between what is ethically acceptable and scientifically possible, the ethical perspective would prevail.

I join the chair of the Standing Committee on Health in commending this report on building families to every member of the House.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, like the Canadian Alliance member—

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. Is there unanimous consent to allow the hon. member for Drummond to reply to this report?

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, although the Bloc Quebecois supports the broad outline of this report—and we consider essential to further action the broad consensus in it on the dignity of the human being, the non-commercialization of human reproductive material, informed choices, accountability and transparency—we have reservations about the federal government prohibiting certain activities.

We must remember that large areas of medically assisted reproduction come under provincial jurisdiction. I am thinking of the delivery of health care services, including the establishment of fertility clinics, the status of descendants, which has to do with family law, and therefore civil law and, of course, counselling for surrogate mothers and for potential donors, which directly involves the provincial health care systems.

The government must tread carefully in these regulatory areas. It must consult the provinces and work with them in establishing certain regulations, because it is the provinces that deliver the services.

Broadcasting Act
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—Petite-Patrie, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-420, an act to amend the Broadcasting Act (reduction of violence in television broadcasts).

Mr. Speaker, it brings me great pleasure today to introduce this bill to amend the Broadcasting Act.

This bill has three purposes: first, to register the public's concern regarding violence on television, second, to include in the act a regulation on violence on television based on the standards established by the Canadian Broadcasting Standards Council and others; and finally, to prohibit the broadcasting of violent programs during children's prime time viewing hours.

This bill was developed based on consultations in Quebec, in particular in the riding of my colleague, the member for Berthier—Montcalm. I hope that the bill will be passed.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Parliament of Canada Act
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jim Pankiw Saskatoon—Humboldt, SK

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-421, an act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act and the Canada Elections Act (fixed election dates).

Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to introduce this bill entitled an act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act and the Canada Elections Act (fixed election dates).

The purpose of the bill is to fix federal elections to take place on the third Monday of June every four years. If the bill is passed, the next federal election would be held on June 16, 2003. What this bill would do is bring consistency and accountability to the election process and prevent the current Liberal practice of manipulating election dates for crass political opportunistic reasons by timing them with major government spending announcements for example.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Steckle Huron—Bruce, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to present a petition wherein the petitioners are suggesting that rural mail carriers are earning less money than the minimum wage and have working conditions reminiscent of another era. They also believe that they have not been allowed to bargain collectively to improve their wages and working conditions like other workers. They also believe that section 13(5) of the Canada Post Corporation Act prohibits the RRMCs from having collective bargaining rights.

The petitioners therefore call upon parliament to repeal section 13(5) of the Canada Post Corporation Act.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Andrew Telegdi Kitchener—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am presenting a petition signed by 1,274 people which calls on the Government of Canada to use its good offices to help stop the persecution of Falun Gong practitioners in China.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Andrew Telegdi Kitchener—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am presenting another petition signed by 781 people which calls on the federal government to disengage from military action in Afghanistan.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Colleen Beaumier Brampton West—Mississauga, ON

Mr. Speaker, today is quite an appropriate time for this petition. It calls on parliament to make the guarantee and assurance that human rights for women be a requisite for any new government before its term of office begins, and that a system for reporting and investigating human rights complaints be established in Afghanistan.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, Question No. 83 will be answered today:

Question No. 83
Routine Proceedings

December 12th, 2001 / 3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Tony Valeri Stoney Creek, ON

With regards to the changes made to the financial services sector by the coming into force of the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada Act, does the government have plans to allow for the acquisition of demutualized insurance companies?