House of Commons Hansard #132 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was waste.

Topics

The Budget
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, once again, not only was the finance committee's report very influential in the preparation of the budget, as it has been in the past, but it also signalled the directions it thought we should take in the future, which it has done before and which we have ultimately followed.

I would like once again to take the opportunity, following upon the hon. member's question, to thank members of the finance committee, especially members on the Liberal side, for the extensive consultations and very hard work they have put into this.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jason Kenney Calgary Southeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, perhaps the finance minister could have shown his gratitude by actually accepting a couple of the committee's major recommendations. Instead he contradicted it when it said to reallocate; when it said not to raise taxes, as he did in this budget; when it said use a five year planning horizon, which he did not in this budget; when it said sell Petro-Canada, which he did not; and when it said have an audit of regulations, which he did not.

Why did the finance minister send the finance committee out on a dog and pony show when he did not recommend a single one of its major recommendations? How can he claim that this budget was based on public consultation, when he ignored the committee's major report?

The Budget
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is factually incorrect. Anybody who reads the finance committee's report, this one and the previous finance committee report, can see the degree to which the government has been influenced. That is because of the very hard work which has been done, not only by the finance committee but by the caucus committees on the government side, which began work immediately.

I look forward one month after the budget, when the House comes back, to beginning that period of extensive consultation. I would like to thank all government members for all the hard work they put into our budget.

National Security
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, allegations have been made that Citizenship and Immigration Canada has been singling out foreign students from middle eastern countries already in Canada for questioning related to security concerns.

Could the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration please confirm whether this is true or not?

National Security
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Liberal

Elinor Caplan Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for this very important question. I would like to remind her and others that they should not believe everything they read in the newspaper. In fact, the article that she refers to had one quote that was correct and that was from immigration spokesman René Mercier when he said “There is no such operation going on”.

I can confirm that CIC is not targeting any one group.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

December 14th, 2001 / 11:40 a.m.

NDP

Dick Proctor Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, the government is being sued by a U.S. chemical maker for $160 million for banning the pesticide Lindane used for treating canola. This company, formerly Uniroyal, claims the ban is tantamount to expropriation.

The government, which never acts independently but only submits to American dictates, had banned the use of this pesticide after Washington warned it would block all imports containing residue from Lindane, a product prohibited in the United States.

My question for the Minister for International Trade. Is this not a case of banned if we do and banned if we do not?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, that product was voluntarily withdrawn from the Canadian market by the manufacturer.

International Trade
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have a supplementary question for the Minister for International Trade.

Ethyl Corporation, UPS and now Crompton Corporation, how many more times must Canada be sued by American companies for defending our sovereignty, for defending the health and the environment of Canadians before the government will finally stand up and either get rid of chapter 11 of NAFTA or abrogate the deal?

Will the minister assure the House that his government will not sign any new trade deal, such as the FTAA, that would include the investor state provision that puts corporate power ahead of the environment and the health of Canadians?

International Trade
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister for International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I totally disagree with the member. I do think NAFTA has served Canada very well.

I am not surprised that the NDP would like us to throw away NAFTA and the free trade agreement with the United States. However that is not the policy of this government.

As far as chapter 11 is concerned, I want the member and all Canadians to know that we have added some clarifications to chapter 11, which was the very policy this government was promoting. We will continue to work on improving what we already have, not throwing away everything that has served Canadian interests so very well.

Auberge Grand-Mère
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, like ghosts of Christmas past, the Auberge Grand-Mère scandal continues to haunt the Prime Minister.

François Beaudoin has a lawsuit pending that could expose many sordid details of political interference and conflict of interest on the part of the Prime Minister. Attempts to sanitize files, unlawful seizure of documents, emissaries from the PMO, like Jean Carle, and now the seizure of a personal computer by the RCMP.

Is there a link or an element of intimidation behind this second raid of François Beaudoin's home and the lawsuit against the government?

Auberge Grand-Mère
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Bonavista—Trinity—Conception
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Brian Tobin Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the only thing sordid and pathetic in all of this is that while most members of parliament are concerned about the real issues that affect Canadians where they live, that party and that party only asks questions that can go nowhere, that are designed to attack the integrity of the Prime Minister, that are not based on fact and that attack the credibility and the integrity of the RCMP.

That is sordid, pathetic and out of line.

Auberge Grand-Mère
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, integrity and parliamentary accountability are pretty important but maybe not to the minister.

The RCMP and investigations are supposed to be confidential, he tells us. In the raid of François Beaudoin's home yesterday morning it appears that reporters learned about the seizure before Mr. Beaudoin and his attorney.

I suggest this is entirely within the responsibility of the solicitor general to know and explain this highly suspect occurrence where reporters get the head's up about an RCMP raid.

Will the solicitor general tell us, did he know?

Auberge Grand-Mère
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, again my hon. colleague and his party continually want to destroy the credibility of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

The fact is that there is a process to take if they have a problem with the actions of the RCMP. It is certainly obvious that they have a big problem with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. If they do, there is a public complaints commission that they can bring their complaint to.

Research and Development
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, the House leader said that the new legislation on cloning and stem cell research would not be introduced until May. Summer will come and still no laws against cloning will be on the books.

The health committee worked very hard to table the report before Christmas because this is an urgent matter.

Will the health minister promise that legislation will be introduced before the end of March at the latest?

Research and Development
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, this subject is a priority for me and for the government. We will introduce legislation as early as possible in the new year.