House of Commons Hansard #23 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was species.

Topics

2 p.m.

The Speaker

As is our practice on Wednesday we will now sing O Canada, led by the hon. member for London—Fanshawe.

Gildas Molgat
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

John Harvard Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia, MB

Mr. Speaker, with sadness and heavy heart I rise today to inform the House of the death of Senator Gil Molgat of Manitoba.

Mr. Molgat, who just last month completed a rare two terms as Senate Speaker, died this morning at the Ottawa General Hospital after suffering a massive cerebral hemorrhage Monday evening while on a flight from Winnipeg to Ottawa. He was 74.

Mr. Molgat was elected five times to the Manitoba legislature, where he served as opposition leader from 1961 to 1969. He was called to the Senate in 1970 and was Speaker there from 1994 to January of this year.

Senator Molgat was a great parliamentarian who was driven by the call to public duty. Above all, he was a gentleman and a true friend whom we loved deeply.

We have lost a great Canadian and an extraordinary public servant. He will be missed and long remembered. On behalf of the House and the thousands whose lives he touched, I extend condolences to Mrs. Molgat and the family.

Agriculture
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Carol Skelton Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, I wish to quote a letter I received from two teachers expressing concern over the situation on Canadians farms:

I have travelled in Canada from coast to coast and I have pride in this beautiful country. I have been humbled and grateful to be part of such a vast land filled with generous and friendly people. I've agonized with the people in Quebec and Ontario during the ice storm that was so devastating. I've watched in horror the flooding in Quebec and Manitoba. And in each instance I've sent a cheque because this is my country and my country needed help.

I can't understand why the rest of Canada does not realize that the prairies are now facing the same kind of economic crisis—a crisis not of their making.

I am adding my voice to the rest, imploring those in power to seek justice and economic fairness for those employed in perhaps the noblest of professions—growing food for a hungry world.

Yours Sincerely,

Mike and Elaine Kowpak.

I urge the government to heed these words and take immediate action to deal with the crisis facing farm families.

Gildas Molgat
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Reg Alcock Winnipeg South, MB

Mr. Speaker, Gildas Molgat was first elected to the legislature of Manitoba in 1953 when I was five years old. I became aware of him early on in my life as his work as the Liberal leader and leader of the opposition in the Manitoba legislature was often the focus of some very heated discussion between my very Conservative parents.

Later when I, having joined the Liberal Party, finally met this often demonized man, I was delighted to find a proud Manitoban, a proud francophone and a committed Canadian.

Elevated to the Senate by Prime Minister Trudeau, Gil Molgat was a formidable ally in the dark days when there was only one elected Liberal, federally or provincially, west of the Ontario-Manitoba border.

He was tireless. When the troops were frustrated and dispirited, Gil and his lifelong partner Allison were there, working with us, leading us, teaching us, chairing campaigns, recruiting candidates, and always advocating for his province and his people.

Since my arrival here in 1993 it has been an honour and a rare privilege to serve in the same caucus with him. He served for six years in one of the highest offices in this country and yet he never forgot what it was to be the MLA for Ste. Rose du Lac. We will miss him.

Patricia Baird
Statements By Members

February 28th, 2001 / 2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Stephen Owen Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to inform the House of the appointment of a constituent from Vancouver Quadra, Dr. Patricia Baird, as an officer of the Order of Canada.

Dr. Baird first came to the attention of Canadians across the country when she produced her groundbreaking report on new reproductive technologies in 1993. This report quickly became the touchstone for this controversial area of genetics and public policy, and Dr. Baird became a key contact when these issues arose across the country as well as around the world.

She began her illustrious career at the faculty of medicine at the University of British Columbia, the key institutional constituent of Vancouver Quadra, where she was head of medical genetics and took that department to fame across the country in terms of research and clinical care.

In her personal capacity she has published over 350 papers. She has been a member of the Medical Research Council of Canada and a member of the Prime Minister's National Advisory Board on Science and Technology. Dr. Baird is a most worthy officer of the Order of Canada.

Hiv-Aids
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Nancy Karetak-Lindell Nunavut, NU

Mr. Speaker, currently four remote Nunavut communities are hosting youth HIV-AIDS fairs in association with Health Canada and Pauktuutit Inuit Women's Association.

Much like a science fair, projects and posters on HIV-AIDS were created and will be the basis of future community based HIV-AIDS education initiatives.

HIV positive youth will bravely share their stories with Inuit youth and reinforce the message that it is so important to prevent the spread of HIV-AIDS.

The youth of Arctic Bay, Taloyoak, Pangnirtung and Iqaluit took on this project with enthusiasm and I know the important message will be heard through Nunavut because of their courageous efforts.

I commend their involvement in their communities and their desire to protect their fellow man.

Veterans Affairs
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Peter Goldring Edmonton Centre-East, AB

Mr. Speaker, Canada's soldiers have paid with their lives and their health in the service of our country since Confederation. How well we attend to the concerns of our veterans is a matter of our national conscience.

Today we mark the 10th anniversary of the end of the gulf war. With us today in the gallery are three retired gulf war veterans of Canada's peacekeeping mission. They are Captain Louise Richard, Petty Officer First Class Robert Clarke, and Captain Sean Bruyea. Each bears deep scars to health and soul brought on through their service to our country. Each wants respect and recognition as a war veteran.

Today I call on the government to do right by these peacekeeping veterans and to accord them the recognition and status that their sacrifices so clearly merit. I ask my colleagues to join me in welcoming our peacekeeping veterans.

Heroism
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Carmen Provenzano Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to share with the House a heartwarming story that bridges the gap between generations and nations.

We have in Ottawa this week a very special visitor from France, Guillaume Faure, a grandson of André Faure, who put himself at risk to help a Canadian airman reach freedom during the second world war.

During his 32nd bombing mission, Canadian airman Thomas Lynch, who served in the Royal Air Force, was shot down over occupied France some 50 kilometres northwest of Paris. Thanks to Madam Faure and her teenage children who hid him from the Gestapo, Mr. Lynch was able to contact the French underground and escape safely to England.

More than 50 years later, Mr. Lynch and his grandson are meeting in person for the first time with the grandson of the family who saved his life.

This is a story that Canadians will be happy to hear. Through Mr. Lynch, these two young men of a new generation are sharing the experience that entwined their families.

Agriculture
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Aileen Carroll Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford, ON

Mr. Speaker, our farmers have already told us and now a report on agricultural policy by the OECD is telling us that Canada's support for agriculture is much lower than that of most other OECD nations.

I applaud the Liberal government's commitment to a level playing field to ensure that our agriculture and agrifood industry can compete at the international level. Canada has taken great strides toward this goal.

At this time, however, I would encourage the government to look within Canada and provide our agricultural producers with the tools they need to compete, including effective policies and programs and more financial support.

Investments In The Manufacturing Sector
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, two weeks ago, the China World Best Group officially signed a $45 million investment agreement for the construction of a dye-works in Drummondville. The plant will create 380 jobs in its first year of operation.

Group president Zhou Yu Chen made the following statement “By establishing ourselves here, we are going to be able to benefit from Quebec's comparative advantages as far as the costs of construction, energy and shipping, and particularly the quality of its workers, are concerned”. He went on to say that he had absolutely no concerns about Quebec sovereignty.

This, the first Chinese manufacturing plant to locate in Quebec, chose to do so in the riding of Drummond, where companies from over ten countries have already invested their foreign capital in more than thirty properties.

Given that nearly all the elected representatives in Quebec are sovereignists, it must be admitted that Quebec sovereignty no longer frightens anyone.

The Senate
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, a Senate seat has now become vacant in the province of Saskatchewan with the resignation of Eric Berntson. This represents a wonderful opportunity for the government to reach out to western Canada and show that it is committed to meaningful parliamentary reform.

The Senate was created to provide the checks and balances necessary for a democracy to work effectively. Areas of high population should not run roughshod over less populated regions, and for the Senate to be properly accountable it must be elected.

The separation movement in my riding would likely not have started if the government had not neglected the agricultural areas of our country.

Our next senator in Saskatchewan should be selected by the people of Saskatchewan. The problem is not Canada. It is the federal government and the fact that we no longer have an effective democracy. It is more like an elected dictatorship.

Will the Prime Minister, who claims to represent the interests of all Canadians, allow this seat to be held in trust until the provincial government passes legislation to elect its federal representatives in the Senate?

Agriculture
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Rose-Marie Ur Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, despite all its accomplishments, mankind owes its existence to six inches of topsoil and the fact that it rains.

As sure as spring follows winter and the first robin is seen, our grain and oilseed farmers will be taking their machinery out of storage, preparing for spring seeding. As they venture out into the fertile fields of our nation, as they prepare once again to feed the world, there are storm clouds on the horizon which may lead to a bitter harvest in the fall.

It is time for action. It is time for immediate assistance to enhance our current farm safety net programs. It is time to recognize our primary producers and aid them in their battle with foreign subsidies four times higher than our own.

Spring planting will soon be upon us. Let us work toward that.

The Environment
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—St. Clair, ON

Mr. Speaker, like many Canadians I once believed that our country had a strong record on the environment, a record we could be proud of both at home and abroad.

However the sad reality is that under the Liberal government Canada in fact has a rather shameful record. This was made abundantly clear by the auditor general in his final report to the House yesterday in which he summed up 10 years of disappointment with the lack of federal commitment and action on the environment. He once again highlighted in his report the Liberal government's dismal failure to meet international and domestic commitments to the environment.

Repeated audits have condemned the Liberal government for failing to address important issues like urban smog, a particular problem in my riding, and others such as global warming, toxic substances, groundwater contamination and biodiversity.

The 1990 report of the auditor general asked of the environment department who is minding the store, a question that is repeated in yesterday's report but still remains unanswered 10 years later. The auditor general's report—

The Environment
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Cumberland—Colchester.

Agriculture
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Bill Casey Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada has failed to address the catastrophic problem with P.E.I. potato exports to the United States.

The government threw away the tools to work with when it instigated the ban on Brazilian beef based on vague Canadian scientific information. When the Americans then used the same argument for P.E.I. potatoes, Canadians were unable to credibly defend themselves because they had just used the same questionable reasons to ban Brazilian beef.

The Government of Canada should now move to actively and assertively deal with the serious problem which affects the economy of the entire province of Prince Edward Island.

Will the minister of agriculture provide interim bridge assistance for the P.E.I. farmers and will the Department of Foreign Affairs aggressively deal with this problem on behalf of these same farmers?