House of Commons Hansard #50 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tobacco.

Topics

Day Of Mourning
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

Judi Longfield Whitby—Ajax, ON

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow, April 28, marks the 10th annual National Day of Mourning. We observe this day to honour those who have been killed or injured in the workplace. It is because of these tragic deaths that I rise today to remind my colleagues that making a greater commitment to workplace safety benefits all Canadians.

The National Day of Mourning takes on even more meaning when we look at the alarming statistics. An average of three Canadians are killed every working day and one is injured every nine seconds. This accounts for nearly 800 deaths and some 800,000 injuries every year.

Although the number of workplace accidents has been reduced over the past 10 years, this day serves as an important reminder that we must prevent these accidents from ever happening.

We pay tribute to those we remember today by putting forth our best efforts to strive for safer and healthier workplaces through continued education, awareness and co-operation.

I ask members of the House to take time tomorrow to remember the workers who lost their lives or who were injured on the job over the last year. We extend our deepest sympathies to the families and friends of those workers.

Hepatitis C
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Rob Merrifield Yellowhead, AB

Mr. Speaker, three years ago this week the Liberal government turned its back on thousands of Canadians who were poisoned by blood tainted with hepatitis C. On April 28, 1998, the Liberals voted no to a motion which would have extended financial compensation to victims poisoned beyond the years of 1986 and 1990.

Thousands of victims were let down by the federal government. Among those who did qualify for compensation, many have yet to see a dime. Joey Haché was one of those individuals. Joey was in the gallery that fateful day three years ago and he is here again today to register his protest. Days after that vote Joey was advised that he qualified for that compensation. Three years later Joey is one of thousands who have received nothing.

Joey is asking “Where is the compensation that was promised?” and thousands of other hepatitis C victims still want to know “What about us?”

Multiple Sclerosis
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Beth Phinney Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week walks were held across Canada, including Hamilton and Burlington, as fundraisers for the Multiple Sclerosis Society.

MS is a disease that affects approximately 50,000 Canadians or 1 in 750. Since 1991 the 5 kilometre, 10 kilometre and 15 kilometre walks have grown to include more than 65,000 participants in the 120 communities across Canada. More than $25 million for MS research and services has been raised.

I was pleased to participate in the walk and share the enthusiasm of the day. In the spirit of Volunteer Week and the United Nations Year of the Volunteer, we also recognize all those who organized these events and wish to congratulate them on a job well done.

Summit On Sport
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Bras D'Or—Cape Breton, NS

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to inform the House that today is the start of the National Summit on Sport here in Ottawa, which is being chaired by the Prime Minister of Canada.

The Summit on Sport is the culmination of consultations held across Canada since June 2000 by the hon. Secretary of State for Amateur Sport. The process has included six regional conferences and six round tables.

The summit will bring together 350 delegates representing the leaders of the Canadian sport community. They will be discussing major issues, such as participation, excellence and developing our resources.

I invite members to join me in recognizing the importance of such a summit in Canada and to participate in the ongoing discussions being held this weekend.

Canada Book Day
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Sarmite Bulte Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians across the country celebrated Canada Book Day on April 23.

To mark the day I had the pleasure of hosting my own annual Canada Book Day event on April 17 in my riding. I invited people to come and enjoy the literary richness of our city. My constituents had the pleasure of meeting the following renowned Canadian and local authors: Judy Fong Bates, Martyn Burke, George Elliott Clarke, Victor Coleman, Joe Fiorito, Greg Gatenby, Katherine Govier, Cynthia Holtz, Janice Kulyk and Susan Swan, along with Canadian publisher Kim McArthur.

Founded in 1976, the Writers' Trust of Canada has endeavoured to advance and nurture Canadian writers and Canadian literature. This day provides us with the opportunity to celebrate the important role of literature in Canada's past, present and future.

This day also recognizes Canadian books and the people who write them and encourages Canadians from all walks of life to buy Canadian books.

Hockey
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Maurice Vellacott Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, I wish to pay tribute today to the outstanding coach and AAA midget team from the Beardy's and Okemasis Indian Band in my Saskatoon—Wanuskewin constituency.

The Beardy's Blackhawks proved that they are the best in our part of the country in the western regional finals and are representing us this week in Prince George at the AAA Midget Canada Cup. They have used their speed, strength and determination to be victorious thus far.

We wish the very best to coach Dale Grayson and the whole team of the Beardy's-Okemasis Blackhawks. We commend the Beardy's and Okemasis Indian Band for sponsoring and supporting such an outstanding hockey team.

Bombardier
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Diane St-Jacques Shefford, QC

Mr. Speaker, this past April 16 we learned some good economic news.

Bombardier Inc. announced that it will be hiring one thousand people in the Montreal region in order to fill an order for 50 seater regional jets.

These one thousand new jobs in Dorval will be in addition to the 1,700 projected for Mirabel, where the 70 and 86 seater commuter planes will be (constructed).

Bombardier estimates the value of the 75 orders at $2.35 billion Canadian. They raise the total orders for regional jets to 551.

This local company has an impressive record. In 2001, Bombardier Aeronautics has signed agreements on a total of 96 jet orders.

National Day Of Mourning
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, every year in Canada there are more than 800,000 work related accidents. More than 750 of these will be fatal. That is the sad record of the working conditions of Quebecers and Canadians.

Tomorrow, April 28, will be the tenth anniversary of the National Day of Mourning. This is a very significant event, for it affords us an opportunity to stop for a moment and reflect on the importance of occupational health and safety.

Unfortunately, the Canadian government is not much concerned about the misfortunes of those who have suffered work related accidents and their families. Take, for example, the matter of pregnant or breast-feeding workers. Despite the Bloc Quebecois demands for these women to be afforded true protection in the workplace, the federal government has turned its back on them.

Speaking for myself and for my colleagues in the Bloc Quebecois, I would like to send a word of encouragement to the victims of work related accidents, and their family members. Our thoughts are with you all.

National Day Of Mourning
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, the people of Canada no doubt noticed that our flag is at half mast today. The reason for this is the National Day of Mourning, held to remember the people who have been injured or killed on the job.

The aim of this day is to have us reflect on the importance of occupational health and safety. The figures are staggering. In Canada, some 800,000 accidents occur on the job every year, over 750 of which result in the death of the victim. This means that three workers are killed every working day.

Steps taken by the government resulted in an 11% reduction in the number of industrial accidents between 1993 and 1997. But one accident is one too many.

I would assure those who have lost a loved one in an industrial accident and those who suffer because of such accidents of our profound regret and of our conviction that such misfortunes must be avoided.

Heroism
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Peter Goldring Edmonton Centre-East, AB

Mr. Speaker, today an American doctor, Ronald Shemenski, owes his life to Canada's finest northern frontier aviators.

In failing health, the doctor was plucked from the sardonic, cruelly mocking face of an Antarctic locked in winter's icy grip.

Defying nature's harshest elements, his saviours, three Canadians in a Canadian Twin Otter craft winged nearly from earth's other pole in a bold mission of determined rescue.

Captain Sean Loutitt, flight officer Mark Cary, engineer Peter Brown and northern renowned Kenn Borek Air are to be congratulated.

This event marks another annal in Canada's proud tradition of excellence of men, of craft, of indomitable spirit to rescue where others draw faint, another footnote in Canada's illustrious Hall of Aviation honours and a first rate job by all.

International Astronomy Day
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Yolande Thibeault Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow is International Astronomy Day. It will be an opportunity for all Canadians, young and not so young, to develop an interest in this exciting science.

Stars have an importance for all of us. For some, they point the way to the future or to the past. For others, they explain our time. And for others still, they represent a mystery, the stuff of dreams.

Whatever the stars mean to you, I suggest you go as far as your curiosity will take you. Many activities are being organized in celebration of this pleasant day, including at museums and astronomy clubs.

Be on the lookout for what is happening in your community and take up the invitation science is extending. You will discover a new hobby for sure and even a new passion, perhaps.

Prime Minister
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, at the press conference held at the end of the summit of the Americas, the Prime Minister of Canada remained true to himself when he made another unbelievable statement in responding to those who were opposed to the free trade of the Americas. He told these people that the best way to oppose free trade was “to run for office”.

That was his message to the tens of thousands of young people, women and citizens who marched in the streets of Quebec City to express their will to be respected in the negotiations of agreements that directly affect them. With answers like that, it is no wonder that politicians generate distrust, and anger the public.

How can the Prime Minister, who wants to leave his mark as a champion of democracy, have the nerve to tell people to get elected to be heard, when members of this House were excluded from the negotiating process that preceded the Quebec City summit?

With such a champion, Canadian democracy has a long way to go.

Heroism
Statements By Members

April 27th, 2001 / 11:10 a.m.

Liberal

David Pratt Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I too wish to extend congratulations on behalf of all Canadians to Peter Brown, Mark Cary and Sean Loutitt. These three brave pilots were successful in their heroic attempts this week to rescue an ailing American doctor from a research centre at the South Pole.

Using expertise and skills developed during their training with Kenn Borek Air Ltd. of Calgary, Mr. Brown, Mr. Cary and Mr. Loutitt became Canadian pioneers in their Twin Otter aircraft as they undertook an 8,000 kilometre flight from the southern tip of Chile to the South Pole.

Landing on a runway of solid ice during Antarctica's period of 24 hour darkness and minus 50° temperatures, these three Canadians were able to translate skills learned in their work in Canada's far north to bring the American doctor home for desperately needed medical attention. A flight to the South Pole at this time of year, under these extreme conditions, had never before been undertaken.

Once again the world has seen a demonstration of Canadian ingenuity, expertise and determination. I ask all hon. members of the House and all Canadians to join me in offering our congratulations, our thanks and our best wishes to these brave pilots.

Literacy
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Oakville, ON

Mr. Speaker, in the January Speech from the Throne the government committed to improving Canadians' literacy skills and to reinforcing life long learning. This is a cornerstone of our skills and learning agenda.

That is why I welcome the government's announcement that Alberta Senator Joyce Fairbairn is being reappointed as the special adviser for literacy to the Minister of Human Resources Development.

This decision coincides with the government preparing to invite provincial and territorial governments, as well as the private and voluntary sectors, to launch a new national literacy initiative. There will be a series of round table discussions with representatives from business, labour and academic communities on issues relating to literacy and skills development.

Raising literacy levels is critical to our future economic growth. The government's commitment to literacy is evidence of our commitment to a better quality of life for all Canadians.

Stock Market
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Gerry Ritz Battlefords—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, with our stock markets so volatile these days, here are 10 new definitions for stock market terminology.

Momentum investing: the fine art of buying high and selling low.

Value investing: the art of buying low and selling even lower.

Broker: poorer than you were in 1999.

P/E ratio: the percentage of investors wetting their pants as this market keeps crashing.

Standard and Poor: your life in a nutshell.

Bull market: a random market movement causing an investor to mistake himself for a financial genius.

Bear market: a 6 month to 18 month period when the kids get no allowance, the wife gets no jewellery and the husband sleeps on the couch.

Stock split: your ex-wife and her lawyer split all your assets equally.

Profit: a religious guy who talks to God.

A 64 cent penny stock: what it now costs a loonie to buy.