House of Commons Hansard #43 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was workers.

Topics

Privilege
Oral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have not and will not reveal anything that happens before the board. Members who serve with me know how much I value the work being done by the board and how much I value its secrecy. I think everyone on all sides of the House knows that. I will leave it at that because I think many witnesses would agree with me, privately if not publicly.

I do not believe I did that yesterday. My reference was to media reports of a settlement and nothing else. I will not discuss things the board did or did not corroborate because that would reveal what I said a moment ago I would not reveal. I will not do so to defend myself or for any other reason because it would be inappropriate. I have not done so and will not do so.

That being said, if the hon. member feels that the media reports were wrong and that the word “successfully” was inappropriate in this context, I will unequivocally withdraw the reference to the word “successfully” at page 2668 of yesterday's Hansard . I say unequivocally, notwithstanding the sarcastic and snarky remarks of the hon. member from Edmonton, who is obviously not interested, that I do apologize.

Privilege
Oral Question Period

3:15 p.m.

The Speaker

I think that concludes the matter.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

April 4th, 2001 / 3:15 p.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River
Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table in both official languages the government's response to three petitions.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Maurizio Bevilacqua Vaughan—King—Aurora, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present the second report of the Standing Committee on Finance regarding its order of reference of Wednesday, March 14, 2001, in relation to Bill C-13, an act to amend the Excise Tax Act.

The committee has considered Bill C-13 and reports the bill without amendment.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Andy Scott Fredericton, NB

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the first report of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

Pursuant to the order of reference of Monday, March 26, 2001, the committee has considered Bill C-12, an act to amend the Judges Act and to amend another act in consequence, and reports the bill with amendments.

Competition Act
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Bonavista—Trinity—Conception
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Brian Tobin Minister of Industry

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-23, an act to amend the Competition Act and the Competition Tribunal Act.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Leon Benoit Lakeland, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-328, an act to amend the Criminal Code (theft over $100,000).

Mr. Speaker, the title of the bill is an act to amend the Criminal Code for theft over $100,000.

The purpose of the bill is to do two things. First, to allow a penalty of up to 14 years imprisonment for theft over $100,000. Second, to allow the same 14 year maximum penalty for people who would bring property obtained through crime into the country.

This is long overdue. This change would encourage police officers to carry through on investigations involving white collar crime, such as embezzlement, when there are large amounts of money involved. In the United States, there is grand theft in place, which is a special charge allowing a higher penalty than other theft charges.

It is long overdue in Canada and I look forward to debating the bill in the House.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-329, an act to amend the Criminal Code (protection of children).

Mr. Speaker, I am very happy to rise in the House today to reintroduce the bill in this session of parliament.

This is something that I care about very much. It is a bill that seeks to repeal section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada. This section of the criminal code allows for the use of force as a means of correcting or disciplining a child.

Children are the only group in society that adults are allowed to use force against, as outlined in the current section 43 of the criminal code.

My bill would seek to uphold the rights of the child as outlined in international law and many other policies and programs of the government. It would also seek to enforce that there are adequate means of correction that need not involve physical harm or force against children.

I am very happy to introduce the bill in the House today.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Speller Haldimand—Norfolk—Brant, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-330, an act to amend the Criminal Code (desecration of the Canadian Flag).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to introduce a bill to amend the criminal code regarding the desecration of the Canadian flag. I thank the member for Eglinton—Lawrence for seconding the motion.

We all know that a vast majority of Canadians are proud of the flag as a national symbol and believe that the desecration of it is an offence. The flag is a symbol of our freedom and independence. For those who fought for our country's liberty, the destruction of our flag is particularly upsetting.

Unfortunately there are some people who feel that by destroying our flag they are expressing their disagreement with government policy or the entire nation itself as a means of protest.

In this vein I put forward the bill to protect our national symbol. I am not advocating throwing people in jail over this, but I do think a fine on a sliding scale is appropriate punishment for those who wilfully destroy our most profound national symbol.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Ukrainian Canadian Restitution Act
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Inky Mark Dauphin—Swan River, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-331, an act to recognize the injustice that was done to persons of Ukrainian descent and other Europeans who were interned at the time of the first world war and to provide for public commemoration and for restitution which is to be devoted to education and the promotion of tolerance.

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to rise today to introduce my bill. The bill calls for a redress of the Ukrainian internment which occurred during the first world war, when over 5,000 citizens were interned and over 80,000 were made to register like common criminals.

I thank the current Speaker who was an advocate back in the days when he first came to the House. The current Prime Minister, when he was leader of the official opposition previous to his days as Prime Minister, promised Canadians of Ukrainian descent that he would deal with the issue. To date he has not.

I ask all members for their support to bring a resolution to this issue once and for all.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Special Economic Measures Act
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-332, an act to amend the Special Economic Measures Act.

Mr. Speaker, the Special Economic Measures Act is not often mentioned, but we felt that it needed to be amended when we saw first minister Axworthy and now the current Minister of Foreign Affairs involved in a conflict in Sudan, where a Canadian company is associated with serious and repeated human rights violations. In fact, Human Rights Watch indicated this year that the company was associated with the continuation and intensification of war.

However, the Special Economic Measures Act could not be implemented by the Canadian government alone and, secondly, it could not be invoked for situations where the actions of companies resulted in serious and repeated human rights violations.

By amending the act, the bill will give authority to the governor in council to take action. We hope that the government will hear this strong voice.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Sex Offender Registry Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Randy White Langley—Abbotsford, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-333, an act to establish and maintain a national registry of sex offenders to protect the children and communities of Canada.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to introduce the enabling legislation that would provide a guideline for the development of a national sex offender registry. The bill has a great deal of support from all opposition parties in the House, and I sincerely hope the governing party.

The real credit for the draft legislation goes to Canada's 30,000 policemen, victims of sexual crimes and our country's law-abiding citizens. The draft legislation is modelled after Christopher's bill, the Ontario sex offender legislation.

We expect the government to take the legislation in the spirit it was developed in a non-partisan manner and forward it to the House of Commons justice committee. We expect the government to honour the motion unanimously passed in the House of Commons on March 13 which read:

That the government establish a national sex offender registry by January 30, 2002.

This bill would assist in the protection of our women and children. I sincerely hope the government takes action now as we have not seen any yet, and we are growing impatient with its inaction.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Sex Offender Registry Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, I ask for unanimous consent to pass Motion No. 330 which reads:

That, in the opinion of this House, the government should introduce a comprehensive plan of action to stop the international drug trade that should undertake to: (a) reduce domestic consumption through drug rehabilitation programs based upon some of the new and effective European models; (b) prevent the use of drugs in the early stages of childhood by introducing a national Headstart program that focuses on strengthening the parent-child bond; (c) pursue a hemispheric free trade agreement that reduces tariff, non-tariff barriers and the elimination of double taxation regimes; and (d) introduce amendments to the criminal code based on the model of the American Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organisation Act (RICO); and that this plan should be taken to the Summit of the Americas and the Organization of American States for further action.

Sex Offender Registry Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Bélair)

Does the hon. member have unanimous consent to present the motion?

Sex Offender Registry Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.