House of Commons Hansard #68 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was public.

Topics

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the bill was passed. The new act is very good for Quebec and it will allow the Quebec government to apply its system.

The Bloc members keep referring to some kind of unanimity, but we reviewed this bill, the Liberal members of this House examined it, and we are satisfied that it is what is needed at this point in Quebec and elsewhere in Canada.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, judges are not satisfied, defence counsels are not satisfied, crown attorneys are not satisfied, nor are police officers, educators, social workers and members of the Quebec Liberal Party. That is a lot of people. The Prime Minister himself told us that his act could be terrible.

Instead of assessing the risk, instead of doing its homework, the government claims that it is the only one to understand the situation. Instead of experimenting at the expense of young people, will the Prime Minister admit that his government should have done some thinking before legislating instead of the other way around?

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we spent four years thinking about this issue, unlike them, whose minds were made up beforehand.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Berthier—Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister says that the law is clear and that Quebec will be able to continue with its approach.

It does not seem as clear as all that to the deputy director of youth protection, who has said that with this bill, 1% of youths are being sent to prison, where they can improve their skills as criminals, while we are losing the opportunity of intervening with the other 99%.

Does the Prime Minister understand that the new young offenders legislation is clear? From now on, by placing the emphasis on the 1% of young people involved in serious crime, we are, to all intents and purposes, abandoning the other 99% to their fate.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member continues to misrepresent the intention and effect of the new youth criminal justice legislation. He talks about rehabilitation and reintegration. In fact, our new legislation puts an increased emphasis on rehabilitation and reintegration. We will provide additional resources to the government of Quebec to do just that.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Berthier—Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, I will give the Prime Minister another example so that he will understand clearly.

One weekend, a youngster steals a car, without giving it any thought in advance, and another steals a car in a very premeditated way on behalf of organized crime.

We have two very different behaviours involving the same offence, and therefore two very different approaches applied to the young offenders. With the minister's new law, however, everyone is the same, everyone is on the same footing.

Does the Prime Minister realize that for everyone in Quebec there is a difference between these two and that the law must be enforced differently, which the present Young Offenders Act allows?

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. It is impossible for the Chair to hear what the hon. Minister of Justice is saying.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member misrepresents the intention and effect of the legislation. Far from being uniform in its effect, one of the main considerations we ask police, judges and others working with young people to take into account is the particular circumstance of the young person who has committed the offence.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Prime Minister.

Across the country, people are calling increasingly for a national infrastructure program for drinking water.

On the weekend, the Canadian Federation of Municipalities called for a permanent program and national water standards. The government's present program is not adequate. Everyone agrees on that.

Is the government going to act and put an adequate new drinking water program in place?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, we have an infrastructure program at the moment, and its total cost is $7 billion. As a priority, we have set green infrastructures, where we can improve air and water quality.

As the result of our agreements with the provinces, at least 50% of the money will be dedicated to this very problem, about $3 billion. This speaks of this government's commitment.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, the government refuses to recognize a crisis when it is staring them in the face. The minister pretends that the existing infrastructure program meets the need but she knows it is not true. Seventeen hundred municipal officials said so on the weekend. Saskatchewan's premier said so yesterday. Hundreds of thousands of Canadians who cannot drink their own drinking water safely know it to be so.

The water quality crisis is plaguing more and more Canadians. What will it to take for the government to act?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, during the weekend we also had discussions with the mayors. I think four cabinet ministers were there for the discussions with the mayors. They agreed with us and they were pleased with our new program of infrastructure.

In the agreement that we have with them, a minimum of 50% of the funds should go to the green infrastructure, but it could be more than that. They agree with us also that it is not only an investment of money but that we should look at innovation and technology. We share with them their concern and we will help them to solve the problems.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

May 30th, 2001 / 2:30 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Joe Clark Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for the Prime Minister about helicopters. The government is buying helicopters that cannot stay in the air long enough in bad weather. His parliamentary secretary said he justifies that because times are changing.

One thing that has not changed is an estimate by the Department of National Defence that says in bad weather helicopters might have to stay in the air at least three hours. That is longer than these helicopters can stay in the air in order to perform rescues 100 miles offshore the Atlantic coast. What is the policy of the government? Is it just going to let—

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

The Speaker

The Right Hon. Prime Minister.