House of Commons Hansard #83 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was united.

Topics

Terrorism
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Sarmite Bulte Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, the apocalyptic events which occurred last week shocked the world as terrorists waged a premeditated attack on the United States.

President Bush called the attack the first war of the 21st century but noted that it was not just an attack against Americans; it was an attack on freedom and democracy everywhere.

Combating elusive terrorists is not nearly as straightforward as fighting a conventional war. What is needed is a measured and concentrated international response by a strike force comprising as many nations as possible and standing up for a way of life and a set of shared beliefs that define mankind.

Targeting refugee claimants and immigrants is not the answer. Those who have attacked Muslim Canadians are as mindless as those who danced with joy at the news of the misfortune of the United States.

I remind Canadians what the Prime Minister said on Monday:

We will allow no one to force us to sacrifice our values or traditions under the pressure of urgent circumstances.

United States of America
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Brian Fitzpatrick Prince Albert, SK

Mr. Speaker, the terrorist attacks on the United States last week should remind us all that anti-Americanism is far too prevalent in this country.

Throughout the last century the United States was a positive force for freedom and democracy in the world. Through mechanisms like the Marshall plan, NATO and NORAD the United States has successfully revitalized national economies and helped guarantee international security.

Yet just last week, after being subject to an unprovoked attack by vicious killers, our American allies were subjected to a repugnant attack in a CBC townhall meeting where an audience brimming with anti-American fanatics tried to suggest America was to blame for the tragedy because of its policies.

This sort of doublethink must be challenged. The cavalier assumptions of superiority must stop. Americans must know that the vast majority of Canadians are behind our closest allies as we prepare for this war against terrorism.

Walk of Hope
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, as a former president of the United Way, it gives me great pleasure to inform the House that at noon today a Walk of Hope will take place. We are walking in memory of the victims of the tragedy of September 11. We will leave from the Centennial Flame and will cross the Interprovincial and Portage bridges, covering a route of five kilometres.

We ask that people wear red, white and blue and carry Canadian and American flags. Please come and walk to show support and solidarity with all those who have been affected by this terrible tragedy.

I want to thank the United Way committee for organizing and leading this demonstration. I want to thank the many volunteers who will collect donations for the Canadian Red Cross Society relief effort and I encourage people to donate generously.

Let us stand and walk together in this demonstration of our common stand for peace, justice and humanity.

Terrorism
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Wendy Lill Dartmouth, NS

Mr. Speaker, last night we held a special debate to provide counsel to the Prime Minister before Monday's meeting with President Bush in the wake of last week's events. We stood together and tried to articulate our horror. We conveyed our love to the shattered families, condemned the evil and called to bring these criminals to justice.

In the midst of our debate George Bush made his address to America and announced “You are either with us or with the terrorists.” He forgot that there is another way and that is to stand shoulder to shoulder with all communities desiring to bring these criminals to justice.

Let us seize the opportunity to build new international courts and stronger international law. Let us expose the roots of violence and not extend the terror with our own hands.

A survivor of the 1993 World Trade Center bomb blast said:

If we fail to wage peace instead of war, if we do not learn to value all life as fervently as we value our own, then their deaths will mean nothing and terror and violence will remain our dark companions.

Let us choose life.

Terrorism
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Odina Desrochers Lotbinière—L'Érable, QC

Mr. Speaker, on numerous occasions this week we have called upon the Prime Minister to consult parliament and to take advantage of the opportunity to democratically adopt within the House the government's participation in this fight against international terrorism.

Every time the Prime Minister has remained vague, accepting consultation perhaps, but not allowing a vote in the House. His attitude is in total contradiction to the objective he is pursuing as are we all: to promote freedom and democracy.

Does the Prime Minister realize that he cannot claim to promote these fundamental values when he is not attaching the necessary importance to the institution that is the embodiment of those values and to the elected representatives who sit there?

On behalf of democracy and freedom, we are calling upon him to respond to our legitimate demands and to take advantage of the consensual strength of this parliament in order to add weight to his international undertakings.

Dystonia
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, October 14 to 21 is National Dystonia Awareness Week and volunteers around the country will be active in their own communities to help those suffering from this serious disorder.

Dystonia is a neurological disorder that affects nearly 10,000 Canadians. It is difficult to diagnose and can affect the whole body causing abnormal movement and postures. Often those afflicted by dystonia can go a long period of time without seeking medical assistance because they are unaware of the disorder.

Fortunately there are organizations such as the Dystonia Support Group that is working to promote a greater awareness of dystonia and providing support to known sufferers within the community.

I congratulate all the volunteers and extend my appreciation and gratitude for their dedication and selfless giving.

The Economy
Statements By Members

September 21st, 2001 / 11:15 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Scott Brison Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, in June the finance minister said he would introduce a fall budget if the economy worsened. Clearly the minister recognizes that the economy has indeed worsened.

Since June, 27,000 Canadians have lost their jobs. We have seen the worst quarter in terms of economic growth in six years. Universally economists are speaking of a global recession. Additionally, in light of recent events, we now need to ensure more military and security resources to defend the security of our borders, the safety of our citizens and ultimately to meet our commitment to our allies.

Cabinet is now proposing an economic stimulus package that could run the country into deficit. Canadians deserve a full budget so that their elected members of parliament can play a role in making the tough economic decisions that lie ahead. Canadians want their priorities protected, even if it means reducing frivolous and unnecessary Liberal spending. Canadians do not want an unnecessary budget deficit.

We call on the finance minister to honour his June commitment and to table a full budget this fall.

Terrorism
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Maurice Vellacott Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, the attack on the United States last week not only warned Americans of the destruction that terrorists can cause, but Canadians have realized for the first time that no one is safe from terrorism, including ourselves.

Given this very real danger, what do Canadians have the right to expect of their government? First, they have the right to expect strong anti-terrorism legislation that would ensure that Canada does not harbour terrorists or terrorist groups. Such legislation would define terrorism in a comprehensive manner, name and outlaw specific terrorist groups and would ban fundraising and other support activities on behalf of terrorist groups.

These changes would need to be combined with legislative changes to existing laws, including amending our laws so that we can extradite suspected terrorists.

In addition to legislative changes, Canadians also have the right to expect more resources to be directed toward enforcement. Adequate staffing is crucial at organizations such as CSIS, the RCMP and national defence. The good men and women who work in these organizations must have the tools they need to get the job done.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, the solicitor general has repeatedly denied that there was a Canadian connection to the terrible events of September 11. Yesterday however, the FBI apprehended Nabil Al-Marabh, a man who lived in and was wanted in Canada. U.S. authorities handed him over to Canadian immigration officials but they let him loose.

How can the government continue to deny a Canadian connection?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I said yesterday that I was aware that an individual who spent some time in Canada was arrested by U.S. authorities.

I think all members of the House need to remember this is a worldwide manhunt, and the RCMP and CSIS are working with their counterparts in the U.S. to make sure the people responsible are brought to justice.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is pretty obvious that Canada's immigration and refugee board freed this man and let him out on bail, even after the adjudicator said that he might not show up for bail. That is tough for us to understand. That is exactly what happened. In the interim, the FBI believes that this man may have had a hand in last week's tragic events.

How does releasing a failed refugee claimant with this kind of history keep us safe from terrorism in Canada? I would like to know that.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Liberal

Elinor Caplan Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

First, Mr. Speaker, the member is wrong in his facts. Second, it is very important that we not compromise any investigations, nor should we participate in trial by innuendo.

In Canada we believe in the rule of law. We know that terrorist activities are international in their scope. There have been arrests in France and the United States. If and when we have evidence in Canada, we move to detain. If we have evidence, the RCMP moves to arrest.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, the evidence was very plain. This man was apprehended with a false Canadian passport and false documents. He was turned over to Canadian authorities by the U.S. What did they do with him? They let him out on bail and in the interim he may have been involved.

Once again, and this is in the broad context now, not about this specific individual, how does releasing an individual like this help us in the war against terrorism? How?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Liberal

Elinor Caplan Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member knows that we can and do detain individuals who are security threats when we have that evidence. He should also know that we do not detain individuals on whispers or innuendo. We need to have that evidence. When we do, we take action and we take it immediately.

I would say to the member that in democratic countries like Canada we are governed by the rule of law.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

John Reynolds West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast, BC

Mr. Speaker, the events of last week, including the arrest in the U.S. of Mr. Al-Marabh, have underscored the pressing need for anti-terrorism legislation in the country.

Yesterday the 15 member countries of the European Union came together and adopted tough new measures that would give their police and security forces the tools they need to arrest and extradite suspected terrorists. The European Union acted quickly to ensure that it had the tools needed to fight the war against terrorism.

When will the government do the same thing?