House of Commons Hansard #17 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was appointments.

Topics

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Markham
Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, there have been a number of reports from the Senate, from the House, reports written by experts, and others. We know quite well that the Canadian Forces are under tremendous pressure. We know what to do. We do not have all of the details right now, but we have a very good idea of the direction.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Claude Bachand Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, I understand that the minister has a good idea, but that he does not want to share it with us., and that is the problem right now.

The defence minister has a strange way of going about things. He is calling for substantial increases in funding for the armed forces, without specifying exactly where the money will be used.

Will the minister acknowledge that the only sensible way to approach this issue is to first debate the future role of the armed forces, before increasing their budget? When can we expect a new national defence policy?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Markham
Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I already answered this question. Perhaps I will simply say that this is a good time to be the Minister of National Defence. Before, we only had retired generals to support us. Now, we have good Liberals like Tom Axworthy, Lloyd Axworthy, and a good Liberal paper like the Toronto Star .

It is a great time to be Minister of Defence, Mr. Speaker.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Segregation has a human cost, Mr. Speaker. It hurts aboriginal people and it is hurting the community of Lynn Lake, Manitoba.

The government has committed $44 million to the relocation of aboriginal families from a shared community to a separate new reserve. The cost of this project is more than $600,000 per family.

How does the government justify the enormous cost of this segregation strategy?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Kenora—Rainy River
Ontario

Liberal

Bob Nault Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, I think the member unfortunately has dealt with this issue from the perspective of trying to suggest that people of course are being relocated. This community has never had its home territory as part of its community.

The objective of the Government of Canada is to build a community and a future for these people.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, it is unbelievable. Let us look at the facts. It cost $44 million to build a brand new separate reserve 10 miles away from a town that has underutilized infrastructure, a half empty hospital, a big half empty school and where we can buy a three bedroom house for $6,000, not $600,000.

Natives and non-natives have lived together in Lynn Lake for over 30 years. Could the minister explain what he is trying to accomplish by separating them now?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Kenora—Rainy River
Ontario

Liberal

Bob Nault Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, if the member is suggesting that he has changed the policy of the Alliance Party by agreeing to urban reserves, I am quite intrigued by that because so far that party has opposed every urban reserve creation that the government has attempted.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Judy Sgro York West, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question today is for the Minister of Health.

Today I and other members of the House met with a very special group of people. We met with children who live with type 1 diabetes.

We were all touched with how these beautiful children cope with this disease. They and their parents are here to tell members of Parliament that the government should invest more resources on type 1 diabetes. Over 200,000 Canadians suffer from type 1 diabetes.

Would the Minister of Health please tell the House what the government is doing to deal with a serious disease that affects many children?

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, first, let me acknowledge the very brave and courageous young people who are here today with their families. They unfortunately just had to leave the gallery.

I also want to thank members from all sides of the House who met with these young people today and who brought their courageous stories to each one of us, in terms of the struggle they face in living with type 1 diabetes. Their purpose here today is to make us all aware of the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There is no cure for type 1 diabetes, from which these people suffer, and it is not preventable. That is why the Government of Canada is spending millions of dollars on research--

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Provencher.

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

October 29th, 2002 / 2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Vic Toews Provencher, MB

Mr. Speaker, last Sunday in Toronto a gunman opened fire in crowds, killing four men and wounding five others in less than 90 minutes. Violent gun crimes continue to escalate across Canada.

When will the government admit that the $1 billion wasted on the gun registry could have been better spent by putting more police officers on the street and more criminals behind bars?

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, with regard to the gun registration system, I disagree strongly with the member of Parliament. We have said many times, on this side of the House, that we will keep fighting for a strong and secure society. The policy that we put in place is all about that.

When we look at the two stages, the licensing process is over and the registration is underway and will end at the beginning of the next year. It is going very well. When we look at the statistics and the polls, they show that we have a safer and more secure society. We will keep working for that.

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Vic Toews Provencher, MB

Mr. Speaker, violent crime continues to rise. The murder rate is down only because of timely medical intervention. In Toronto, in 1998, 23% of the murders involved firearms. By last year, the number of murders caused by firearms in Toronto had more than doubled to 52%.

Why does the government continue to strip police of resources, while pumping money into an ineffective gun registry that does not reduce violent crime or keep guns out of the hands of violent criminals?

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, first, when we look at the previous registration system compared to the existing registration system, the level of cancellation with regard to the refusal of the demand has increased by something like 50%.

Second, we live in a global marketplace and a global economy. We live in a society where we must ensure that we provide people with a safe society. If we compare Canada with the United States, the crime rate--

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Mercier.