House of Commons Hansard #26 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-17.

Topics

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the committee to which the hon. member refers is chaired by Dr. Low, a renowned microbiologist at Mount Sinai Hospital. It is a 12 member advisory committee. In fact it had its first meeting by teleconference in October and will be meeting again in December.

Clearly we seek the advice of the committee as we need it and look forward to recommendations it might have for us coming out of the December meeting.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Betty Hinton Kamloops, Thompson And Highland Valleys, BC

Mr. Speaker, Lieutenant Colonel Al Trotter is a highly decorated former prisoner of war being denied his full pension by Veterans Affairs.

For over a year I have been appealing to the minister to set things right and extend benefits to this Canadian hero. The minister has told the media that his officials are reviewing the file. He has had the facts for over a year. What is left to review?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Winnipeg North—St. Paul
Manitoba

Liberal

Rey D. Pagtakhan Minister of Veterans Affairs and Secretary of State (Science

Mr. Speaker, I cannot discuss this individual case. However, I should say that all who had been prisoners of war and who have filed applications for benefits within the law passed by this Parliament have received the benefits according to the law of Parliament.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Betty Hinton Kamloops, Thompson And Highland Valleys, BC

Mr. Speaker, the minister cannot hide behind a loophole. I have met with his predecessor and himself and we have talked about this.

Mr. Trotter is 79 years old. It seems that the minister is delaying until Mr. Trotter and others in his situation are no longer around.

He could make the change today. When can I tell Mr. Trotter that the cheque will finally be in the mail?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Winnipeg North—St. Paul
Manitoba

Liberal

Rey D. Pagtakhan Minister of Veterans Affairs and Secretary of State (Science

Mr. Speaker, this is a very heart-rending case for all of us. That is why I have asked my department to revisit the issue. If amendment of the law remains an option, when the answer is available I will give it to the House of Commons.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, we know that the Department of Foreign Affairs has been toying with the idea of an identity card. The Minister of National Revenue has closed the door on the project, calling it inappropriate, while his colleague from immigration has said that the card may facilitate travellers' access to the United States.

Does the Deputy Prime Minister realize that the solution being proposed by the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration is not the right approach, particularly since the Privacy Commissioner has said that the type of information contained on the card could violate the right to privacy?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bourassa
Québec

Liberal

Denis Coderre Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I think some clarification is in order.

First, we have always talked in terms of a debate. What about the Maple Leaf cards for permanent residents, given the situation between the United States and Canada regarding the border?

Second, when it comes to Canadian citizens, we wondered if we should have a broader debate. We wondered if we could have tools that would facilitate certain situations and ensure that there were preventative measures.

In a democracy, debate is essential, but the government has not taken any position yet.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, in this debate the minister mentioned, he is promoting an identity card, saying, among other things, that it would spare Canadians from having to obtain a visa to cross the border.

Does the minister realize that by opening the door to an identity card, he is upsetting the balance that must exist between security and freedom?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bourassa
Québec

Liberal

Denis Coderre Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, the question the member raises is extremely relevant. This is why it is important to have this balance between openness and vigilance.

That said, we do not wish to create any new identity card. We propose looking into whether or not we could have a debate that would allow us to decide, based on existing technology, what we would like to use. As such, I think that this type of debate would be good. It is up to us to decide.

When we had the debate on the card for permanent residents, it was viewed as a tool to regulate the system. I think that debate is healthy. Canadians will decide, but once again, the Government of Canada has made no decision on this. It is healthy to debate things in this country.

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

November 18th, 2002 / 2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Kevin Sorenson Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, the new Solicitor General has inherited a department that is plagued by serious problems that threaten the security and safety of Canadians. Of immediate concern are 800 parolees who are apparently no longer reporting to their parole officers, thereby dramatically increasing the likelihood of reoffending.

Does the Solicitor General confirm or deny the fact that Correctional Service Canada has lost track of 800 parolees?

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the member struck the nail on the head. I will neither confirm nor deny whether there is a number of parolees. The fact of the matter is though--

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

The Speaker

Order. It is very important that the Chair be able to hear the Solicitor General's answer and there is so much noise I can hardly hear a word.

The hon. minister is trying to answer the question raised by the Alliance Party. Most of the comments that I am sure are intended to be helpful are coming from the Canadian Alliance and I know that they would want to hear the minister's answer since the question came from there.

I know that hon. members are also exchanging their pleasure at seeing one another after a week away, but we do have to be able to hear the questions and the answers and the Solicitor General has the floor, so we will now hear him.

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, I do know that Correctional Service Canada and the National Parole Board take very seriously those people who are granted parole and are out on parole. They do everything within their power to ensure that those people are rehabilitated back into society in a way that ensures the safety of Canadians.

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Kevin Sorenson Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is awfully hard to rehabilitate them back into society when we do not know where they are.

Repeatedly last year the Canadian Alliance brought forward case after case where police officers acting in the line of duty were murdered by parolees. According to Correctional Service Canada's own statistics last year, convicts on parole committed 6 murders, 10 attempted murders, 60 major assaults, 33 rapes and 102 armed robberies.

I ask the Solicitor General, how many more police officers and innocent Canadians have to die before he puts an end to this--