House of Commons Hansard #25 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was kyoto.

Topics

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

November 8th, 2002 / 11:30 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians in Toronto are increasingly vulnerable to gun related crimes. Over the last weekend in October, four people were killed by gunfire and another five wounded in three separate incidents of gun violence.

Instead of the government going after law-abiding hunters and gun owners with its $1 billion firearms registry, the Liberal government should get tough on the criminal misuse of guns.

When will the government introduce legislation to ensure that mandatory minimum sentences for criminals convicted of using a gun in the commission of a crime are upheld?

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Northumberland
Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Justice recently spoke about looking at the Criminal Code in its entirety. In that regard, last week he held a round table to look at the future of the Criminal Code. We will be looking at all these issues in the coming months.

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, round tables and looking at things are simply not good enough for the people of Toronto or anywhere else in Canada. It is clear that rather than wasting time and money registering a hunter's bird gun, the government should be passing laws getting tough on criminals who use guns.

Toronto Police Chief Fantino blames the increased violence in his city to “guns, drugs and gangs”.

Instead of targeting law-abiding gun owners, why will the Liberal government not enact consecutive sentences for firearm related crimes?

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Northumberland
Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as I just mentioned, the review process, which is ongoing with the minister, will look at issues of this nature. We have been providing tools for the law enforcement agencies and the law enforcement agencies are working with those tools. If more tools are needed, we will provide them.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Leader of the Government in the other place said this week that the House of Commons and the Senate would soon be voting on the principles of Kyoto. However, at the Earth Summit in Johannesburg, the Prime Minister made a promise to ratify the Kyoto protocol before Christmas.

Will the Prime Minister tell us exactly what we will be voting on? Will we be voting on the principles of Kyoto, or on the ratification of the Kyoto protocol?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Minister of State and Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is no doubt aware that the ratification itself is an executive function in Canada. This is in our Constitution. This House, of course, will vote to ask the government to ratify the protocol. This is what the Prime Minister said.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the situation is just as ambiguous as before I asked the question. Will the government commit to holding a debate, once members return to the House on November 18, on the ratification of the Kyoto protocol so that on November 21, when the Minister of the Environment meets with his provincial counterparts, he has the support and mandate from the House of Commons to ratify the Kyoto protocol?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Minister of State and Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member just asked a question that is the same as the answer that I gave to his previous question. Why he did this, I do not understand. As for his request to have the House debate the matter prior to consultations with the provinces, I think that most Canadians would be against that idea.

Child Pornography
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Moore Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, the progress of Canada's children in the millennium report of January 2000 estimated that there are 100 child sex trade offences every day in the City of Vancouver.

The City of Coquitlam recently passed a resolution that calls on the Liberal government to:

--ensure the right of children to be free of adult sexual exploitation by amending the Criminal Code to state that no adult can engage in sexual activity with a child under 16 years of age.

The current age of consent is 14 years.

Will the government raise the age of consent from 14 years, yes or no?

Child Pornography
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Northumberland
Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we are continuing to work in every way possible to avoid the sexual exploitation of our children.

One of the issues that has been looked at over the last week has been the raising of the age of sexual consent. However it appears that what would be a better approach may be to deal with legislating against the predators themselves, and that is where we will look.

Child Pornography
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Moore Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, there is nothing preventing the government from doing both.

A federal justice department paper of November 1999 recommended raising the age of consent from 14 to 16 or 18. I personally prefer 18. There is a huge difference between 14 and 16 years of age and 16 and 18 years of age in terms of people's maturity.

Under the law in Canada today, it is perfectly legal, for example, for a 55 year old man to prey upon and have sex with a 14 year old child.

Why is the government tolerating laws that allow a 55 year old man to have sex with a 14 year old kid?

Child Pornography
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Northumberland
Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, this matter was dealt with this week at the federal-provincial-territorial meetings. In reviewing this, there obviously is a great deal of difference of opinion on whether that is the appropriate way to go.

From our perspective, we are looking at the broader nature of the problem and trying to deal with those would be predators.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, up until yesterday the Government of Canada was advising its citizens not to travel to the United States if they were born in one of eight particular countries, because of the special discriminatory treatment awaiting them at the border.

Yesterday, Canada lifted that warning on the grounds that it was reassured by the U.S. Attorney General's announcement that, in future, those targeted would “qualify for, or meet criteria that is intelligence-based that relates to preventing terrorism”.

How can the Canadian government claim to find these words by John Ashcroft reassuring, when they confirm to us that U.S. agents will still be able to make arbitrary decisions?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford
Ontario

Liberal

Aileen Carroll Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I am glad the question was asked, if only to convey what the minister has conveyed to the House. The minister was assured by what Mr. Ashcroft said yesterday in being advised yet again, pursuant to his own discussions, that the question of country of birth will not trigger NSEERS. What Mr. Ashcroft said yesterday confirms that is so.

We are pleased and we will continue to monitor, but that has settled and confirmed our concerns for the moment.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Privacy Commissioner has proposed the removal of place of birth from Canadian passports in order to avoid this type of discrimination.

Will the minister not acknowledge that if he followed this recommendation by the Privacy Commissioner, it would be far more difficult for the Americans to practice discrimination at the border?