House of Commons Hansard #39 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was provinces.

Topics

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Liberal

Elinor Caplan Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, tax treaties are signed with other countries to avoid double taxation. That is very different than the audits required on international accounts. At CCRA we have many experts and we recognize that we need more.

We are hiring auditors. In fact, we are planning to hire 9,600 auditors over the next three years, half of those to replace those that are retiring and those that have been poached by the private sector, and the rest as new auditors so that we will have the capacity we need.

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, are we to understand that the government's tremendous tolerance, which prevents it from closing up tax loopholes, is due to the fact that the former Minister of Finance, who should have been the first person to see that these loopholes are closed, took full advantage of them during all these years?

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Liberal

Elinor Caplan Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, that is an absolutely outrageous assertion by the member opposite. I must tell her that it is the role of CCRA to ensure that all Canadians pay their fair share of taxes, that they do so and meet the obligations of the Income Tax Act. We do that and Canadians should be proud of our efforts.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, the gun registry boondoggle is the result of government fiscal deception. The government is asking Canadians to trust it on major issues like Kyoto and health care. The gun registry is now 500 times higher than the original estimate. The government has failed to produce any cost estimates on Kyoto.

Why should Canadians trust that Kyoto will not bankrupt the country when the government has failed so miserably at estimating the gun registry cost?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, very careful studies were undertaken by the territories, the provinces, the federal government, their officials and private sector firms working together.

Obviously, we cannot know all the variable factors in the economy ten years out. Members opposite may have such clairvoyance, but most of the rest of us do not and therefore we have done the very best job we can. It is contained in the document “Climate Change Plan for Canada”.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, original estimates for the gun registry were $2 million. It has now cost close to a billion dollars. That is 500 times what the government said it would cost taxpayers.

The government has completely mismanaged the gun registry. The government has failed to provide any cost estimates on Kyoto. Why should Canadians believe the government on Kyoto?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is incorrect.

The cost estimates with respect to the impact on the economy and the various provinces of Canada have been done. These have been made public and commented on by provincial premiers and others, as well as the private sector. This is the process whereby we attempt to wholly refine the estimates that have been made.

They clearly have been made and very careful work has been done. I can assure him that no country in the world has done more in an effort to anticipate future costs.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

David Pratt Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, there has been a great deal of concern expressed by Canadians on the urgent need to replace the Sea King helicopters. Could the Minister of National Defence update the House on the status of the maritime helicopter program?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Markham
Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I have often said that a top priority was to get the right helicopter at the lowest possible price as soon as possible.

Accordingly, today I have instructed my officials to proceed as soon as possible with a single tender for a fully equipped helicopter. This action, which is consistent with the industry consensus, is a major step forward in getting lower risk for the taxpayer, better value for the Canadian Forces and, last but not least, speedier development of the helicopter.

Research and Development
Oral Question Period

December 5th, 2002 / 2:40 p.m.

NDP

Wendy Lill Dartmouth, NS

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Industry.

We welcome today's Supreme Court ruling that protects the public interest by rejecting the patenting of life forms. This is a clear message that we must do more to protect the public from the abuse of patent laws that put profits before people. We need a rock solid ban on the patenting of all life forms.

Will the minister commit to amending the Patent Act to make this happen?

Research and Development
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, we received today the judgment of the Supreme Court of Canada. We will be reading it with care.

I can tell my hon. friend and the House we will be acting soon in response to the issue. We will be consulting Canadians and the Canadian Biotechnology Advisory Committee. We will also be listening to the caucus on the issue, as well as cabinet colleagues.

Our effort will be to strike the right balance between, on the one hand, encouraging innovation and, on the other hand, protecting the values of Canadians when it comes to patenting higher life forms.

Housing
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, close to 100 homeless people are facing imminent eviction from their makeshift tents around the Woodward's building in east Vancouver. The newly elected city council there is urgently trying to line up alternate housing.

I would like to ask the minister responsible for homelessness, will she give her commitment that she will work with the city to provide the federal funds necessary so that people are not left on the street? Will she work with the community to secure Woodward's as affordable long-term housing?

Housing
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe
New Brunswick

Liberal

Claudette Bradshaw Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, I want to assure the hon. member that one of our best communities for the homeless is the community of downtown east Vancouver.

The mayor and council of Vancouver have done a tremendous amount of work. I can assure the hon. member that if the community groups want to support the Woodward's building we will be there. I also want to assure the hon. member that the community groups are working very hard to ensure that the homeless have a place to sleep.

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Justice said today that he will keep the gun registry running because he believes in protecting society. What he does not believe in is ministerial and financial accountability. There is absolutely no proof that gun registration is working for Canadian society.

If it can be proved that the gun registry has no benefit to public safety will the minister cancel the gun registration right now?

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member says there is no proof.

What about the more than 7,000 firearm licences that have been refused or revoked? What about police agencies that access the firearms on-line registry 1,500 times daily?

The number of persons prohibited from owning a firearm has also continued to increase by almost 50% from 1998 to 2001. The number of lost or missing firearms has declined by 68% from 1998 to 2001. This is why we are going to keep proceeding--