House of Commons Hansard #161 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was species.

Topics

Grants and Contributions
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Ghislain Lebel Chambly, QC

Mr. Speaker, I can understand why the minister wants to hide behind the auditor general's investigation, but she is not the one in charge of the department.

The minister must tell us if, as we speak, there are still contracts from his department that are being executed by Groupaction, one of its subsidiaries or related companies. If so, what is the nature of these contracts?

Grants and Contributions
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, even those who read today's newspapers, or who listened to the news, know that there are nine companies that execute advertising contracts for the government. There was a call for tenders. We originally had 14 bidders. Of course—and this is already public knowledge—Groupaction is one the nine companies that is doing work for us at this point. There are two or three contracts that are about to be completed. There are jobs that are being done under competitive bidding.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Paul Forseth New Westminster—Coquitlam—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, U.S. officials only told Canada about Suhail Sarwer after he was arrested. We already know that inside our country the RCMP and CSIS do not always talk to each other. Obviously we do not talk to our American counterparts either. So much for the Ridge agreement.

Why would the U.S. wait to tell Canada until after the suspect was in custody? Is there something wrong with our relations with the U.S. when it comes to national security?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, it is unfortunate that my hon. colleague wishes to criticize the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and CSIS. We have one of the best police forces and security intelligence agencies in the world. They have worked with the United States authorities since September 11 and in fact before that. They work in co-operation to make sure that anybody involved in terrorism is brought to justice.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Paul Forseth New Westminster—Coquitlam—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, flag waving does not do it.

It seems the United States has been forced to act alone in capturing this suspected terrorist. Many experts on border security and immigration have warned the government that if Canada does not do its job others will step in and do it for us. This now seems to have happened.

Could the solicitor general explain to Canadians how he can be satisfied with the country's security services if the U.S. has been forced to act alone to catch this terrorist in Canada who was let go by the RCMP?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as I said before, I do not tell the RCMP who they should arrest and who they should not to arrest. If my hon. colleague would give the attorney general of the United States department a ring he would find out exactly how the United States feels about the co-operation between Canada and the United States.

We have an excellent police force and an excellent security intelligence agency that work well with their American counterparts and will continue to do so.

Grants and Contributions
Oral Question Period

March 21st, 2002 / 2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, as far as the awarding of contracts to Groupaction is concerned, every day brings something new, and the more we look into the matter, the more new elements we turn up, which cast more and more doubt.

Given the constantly changing context, I am asking the Minister of Foreign Affairs whether he would not find it wiser to delay Alfonso Gagliano's assumption of ambassadorial duties in Denmark?

Grants and Contributions
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Infrastructure and Crown Corporations

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Gagliano has demonstrated before the committee that he has the necessary capacity to work on behalf of the government and the people of Canada in Denmark.

Grants and Contributions
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, I did hear the minister's answer, but that is not what the issue is. It is that he is an important, if not key, witness for the investigation to be undertaken by the auditor general.

If her conclusions point to the necessity of withdrawing Ambassador Gagliano, has any thought been given to the international consequences of this?

Grants and Contributions
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Infrastructure and Crown Corporations

Mr. Speaker, the auditor general has the right to do whatever she wants as far as the investigation is concerned. But there is no necessity for us to be without representation in Copenhagen because of this.

Leadership Campaigns
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, the finance minister's Alberta bagman, Jim Palmer, was on contract with the Department of Finance to provide advice on tax policy in the energy sector at the same time he was engaged in the secretive effort to raise money from the same energy sector for the finance minister's leadership bid.

How can the Deputy Prime Minister assure us and all Canadians that the finance minister's bagman was not selling tax policy in order to raise money for the minister's leadership slush fund?

Leadership Campaigns
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Infrastructure and Crown Corporations

Mr. Speaker, the matter the hon. member has raised was reviewed by the ethics counsellor. He has observed upon it and corrective action has been taken.

Leadership Campaigns
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, let us look at the facts. Mr. Palmer was secretly raising money for the finance minister's leadership race. He got caught. The lapdog ethics counsellor has advised the Liberal leadership candidates that they can keep raising money in secret. Now it appears that tax policy may have been for sale in order to pay for the finance minister's leadership ambitions.

How can the Deputy Prime Minister assure Canadians that these problems are limited to the finance minister when even the Liberals' own lapdog ethics counsellor will not force ministers to disclose their leadership fundraising now?

Leadership Campaigns
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Infrastructure and Crown Corporations

Mr. Speaker, the ethics counsellor is there to advise the Prime Minister and ministers on matters of possible conflict or apparent conflict.

He has been consulted in this matter. He has given his advice on it and action has been taken to correspond with the advice that the ethics counsellor has given.

The very fact that the process has worked is an indication of the seriousness with which the government takes this very important matter.

Regulatory Reform
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Tony Valeri Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the government House leader.

Canadian companies are faced with an increasingly complicated regulatory process. After investigating, I found that some departments have moved to a performance based system while some have retained the old command and control approach.

When will the government finally move toward a government-wide performance based system of making regulations to reduce the regulatory burden and encourage innovation?