House of Commons Hansard #175 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was wto.

Topics

Child Protection
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as the Minister of Justice said a minute ago, the people who are putting shame on themselves are the opposition members by using an extremely difficult issue. They distort the situation in order to try to score cheap political points. The reason they have no credibility is that the people know the kind of people they are.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, the people in the beaches area of Sept-Îles can no longer drink their water because the Department of Transport has polluted the underground water table. Yesterday, the minister told the member for Manicouagan that he had got it wrong. But the Department of Transport admitted its responsibility in this affair.

So what is the Minister of Transport waiting for to compensate the town of Sept-Îles and find a lasting solution, as the town is requesting? After all, it is his responsibility.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, as I have already explained, we worked with the city of Sept-Îles to find a solution.

I have been told that there are only two households with this problem. We will continue to look for a solution for all the residents of Sept-Îles.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, having deprived the residents of drinking water, the minister is reimbursing the cost of buying bottled water. The city of Sept-Îles has said that this cannot be considered a permanent solution. The minister's position is quite simply shocking.

Why could the people of Sept-Îles not be treated fairly by this government?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we are paying for bottled water until we find a permanent solution. This is obvious.

Child Protection
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Larry Spencer Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, SK

Mr. Speaker, with priorities like that thank goodness the Prime Minister is not running again.

Yesterday the government, by voting not once but twice against our attempts to protect children from sexual predators, proved to Canadians that it was more concerned with the protection of pedophiles and pornographers than with the protection of children. This is shameful.

Could the Minister of Justice explain why the government places the protection of pedophiles and pornographers ahead of protecting children?

Child Protection
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, yesterday we essentially voted in order to make sure that when the government moves ahead to modify or add offences to the existing legislation that they will be declared valid by the Supreme Court of Canada if we have to go there.

We do of course need more consultation but we also need to take our time. In other words, we need to move ahead with a thorough consultation with the population and the stakeholders. That was exactly what was said yesterday and that is what we voted for.

Child Protection
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Larry Spencer Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, SK

Mr. Speaker, moments ago and again just now, before he tried to score his cheap political points, the minister acknowledged that our leader acknowledged the need for consultation in regard to revising Canada's age of consent laws.

The Prime Minister agreed with our leader's assertion. Our amended motion even included this.

If the government agrees with our leader and agrees with the spirit of yesterday's motion, what will the Prime Minister do to get the process moving beyond consultation? We need real action, not just--

Child Protection
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. government House leader.

Child Protection
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I would advise the hon. member, as he well knows, that yesterday, during the discussions with respect to the motion before the House, we offered an amendment that in fact embodied the words of his leader word for word as expressed yesterday in the National Post , and it was turned down.

Volunteer Award
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Erie—Lincoln, ON

Mr. Speaker, as the House knows, this is National Volunteer Week. Last year, during the International Year of the Volunteer, the Minister of Human Resources Development launched the Thérèse Casgrain Volunteer Award to recognize the valuable work of Canadian volunteers.

Could the minister inform the House on the status of this award and who the recipients are this year?

Volunteer Award
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to pay tribute to two of Canada's 6.5 million volunteers. Thanks to Patricia Anzovino's efforts at Casa el Norte, a transition home for refugees fleeing persecution in their homeland, over 10,000 refugees have received food and shelter.

Samuel Bowman's efforts, as co-founder of Pathways, have ensured that thousands of Canada's children, youth and families have benefited from prenatal and postnatal nutrition programs, homeless drop-in centres and childcare services.

Our thanks go out to them for a lifetime of commitment as volunteers.

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Oral Question Period

April 24th, 2002 / 2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

John Williams St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday I accused ACOA of having an ethical deficit because its own staff set up a non-profit organization to apply to ACOA for a loan. Of course it was approved because the people who stamped it approved were the people who applied for the loan in the first place.

The money went to build an interpretive centre in the riding of the solicitor general.

Does the solicitor general think that an ethical deficit, which means breaking every rule in the book, is necessary to get money in his riding?

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Gerry Byrne Minister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency)

Mr. Speaker, if those categorizations were ever true there should be a surplus of questions being faced by the minister responsible for ACOA.

This is the first opportunity I have had to stand on my feet and answer a question in the House since January 16 and I am very pleased to do so.

With respect to the question at hand, I would like to point out to the hon. member that the project in question was put forward as a priority by the provincial government and the community. As the hon. member acknowledged, the project had a very substantial, productive benefit to the area.

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

John Williams St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, the facts are true. They were acknowledged by the president of ACOA yesterday and the Auditor General of Canada.

Ethical deficits and Liberal Party contributors seem to go hand in hand in this country. Perhaps that is why 69% of Canadians believe the government to be corrupt.

The president of APM Inc. just happens to be the president of the Liberal Party in Prince Edward Island. His company, which had the contract to build the interpretive centre, donated $1,000 to the solicitor general's election campaign.

My question is for the solicitor general. Was this a payback, a kickback or just a thank you for the contract?